151 Living Room Medium Hardwood Floors Storage Design Photos And Ideas

When OSSO Architecture first began renovating this loft in a Brooklyn paper factory, it hadn’t been touched since the 1980s. Owner Malik Ashiru says the project achieved his goal of “a big, open space where people could come in and not feel cramped.” The formerly constrained spaces in the 1,400-square-foot, two-story apartment have been reconfigured into an open-plan living space with an office on the first floor and a loft guest bedroom above. On the second floor, the primary bedroom and bath open up to a rooftop terrace. Level changes delineate different spaces in the open-plan first floor, which is stylishly furnished with Ashiru’s midcentury furniture and artwork collected from his travels around the world.
Heather and Kevin sit on a custom sofa in the living room, which features a bank of drawers underneath for storage. Above, a WarmlyYours mirror emits radiant heat and helps warm the tiny home.
A custom leather sofa lifts to reveal battery storage. The custom maple cabinetry is stained and painted in Benjamin Moore’s Swiss Coffee.
The farmhouse-inspired interior features cozy textiles and a light and airy color palette.
Additional storage is hidden in the custom bench, which is finished with concrete-look porcelain slabs.
A view from the kitchen out toward the living area provides a sense of the lofted interior.
A custom cabinet in the ground-floor playroom provides a variety of storage options. “The biggest frustration of parents is that the toys are everywhere,” says Eva. “I always try to create a kids’ corner as well as some space for the parents. And of course enough storage options and a logical layout of the house will help to make a home child friendly.”
The living room features contemporary seating paired with mismatched accent tables from Gaggino, a vintage Harry Bertoia Bird chair, and a lobster-red credenza. Graphic art by John Pearson complements the colour scheme.
The small window has been replaced with a large glazed door, and the original fireplace has been restored and reinstated.
The oak cabinet in the living room was another secondhand find. “It had the exact measurements of the wall,” says Annemie. “We just needed to hang it.” The throw blanket is from La Femme Garniture while the pillows and pendants are custom.
Concrete from the exterior continues indoors as a fireplace surround. For the couch, Annemie found the wooden base and cushion covers in a secondhand store and used baby mattresses as inserts. David made the oak back.
Custom pieces join both vintage and contemporary furnishings in her home. Clara describes her style as a mix of high and low that’s "often bright, cozy, and with a dose of whimsy."
Having spent more time at home in recent months, Nina and her family are truly experiencing the "essence" of her design, she says. Their library corner, a space that was once underused, has become a place of respite for the family where they can gather on the Nanimarquina Rangoli rug and listen to records.
In addition to outfitting the home with furnishings, Kennon also selected the artwork. Here, a painting by New Zealand artist Matt Arbuckle rests on a low built-in storage cabinet clad in Tundra Mist Natural Stone, a material that provides texture against the tonally similar concrete walls.
Removing the hallway created room for a cozy family room upstairs. The family is enjoying the nesting process since the remodel was completed in 2017. "We are raising our kid here, learning how to cook, and I even started to do a lot of working from home here even before the pandemic," says Martin. "We hop from one place to the other, making minor changes and making them our favorite for some time. We spent lots of nights here."
"The angular geometry of the catwalk trusses, the kitchen island, and the bathroom projection together with the 60-degree pitched roof make the project’s geometry performative and visually interesting," says Edgar.
Whitney updated the living room by employing a light palette and rich textures. Beige linen covers the built-in sofa cushions; the pale tone maintains a feeling of spaciousness.
With a budget of £10,400 (approximately $13,000), Intervention Architecture transformed a tiny apartment into a minimalist studio. The firm worked with a cabinetmaker to design a custom unit and centerpiece for the space.
The New Project Group renovated a cramped, uninviting space on Manhattan’s Upper East Side. The company gave the 400-square-foot apartment a gut renovation, with a new kitchen and bathroom designed for efficiency. A parallelogram-shaped window pane, rescued from an architectural salvage yard, was outfitted with steel edges and casters, and repurposed as a coffee table.
The two living rooms at the front of the home sit on slightly different levels. The more formal living room features a linen sofa by Pure Interiors and classic CH22 and CH26 timber chairs by Hans J. Wegner for Carl Hansen & Son.
The casual living room on the ground floor features a vintage cane chair, a Togo sofa by Michel Ducaroy for Ligne Roset, and a portrait titled Matriarch by contemporary Danish artist Henrik Godsk.
A reading nook in the living room makes use of otherwise dead space and offers additional storage.
From the start, the clients wanted their home to have a "barn look," honoring the agrarian vernacular of the built environment around them. Interior walls and ceilings are clad in local pine, with a paint treatment to remove the yellow from the wood.
A cantilevered addition creates more space for the kitchen and pantry, as well as this cozy new family nook.
A “cathedral” roof above the open-plan living area creates a sense of volume in the small space. The storage is all contained in carefully planned bespoke joinery units.
The built-in timber storage units in the living room feature the same concrete top as the kitchen bench and the desk in the study nook. The rawness of the concrete contrasts with the refined oak timber joinery and minimal white walls.
The living area’s cathedral ceiling extends outwards to become the northern veranda awning, which helps to shade the interior.
Atelier Branco built 3,229 square feet of shelving units to house all of the client's texts, documents, and books.
The entry between the living room and dining room was widened.
Two dividing orange bulkheads—which are the box gutters that protrudes through the house—separate the three pavilions. The family congregates in the central pavilion for meals around the dining table, and to relax in the lounge.
The wooden ribbon features integrated storage. The display shelves are backed by decorative brass panels by Egger.
As an homage to the original owners and their art collection, Will and Mark commissioned a digital work by Chicago-based artist duo Luftwerk that can be projected onto the large wall in the living area.
The materials used in the house—concrete blocks and oak floors—are modest, and the detailing is very simple and often workmanlike. The white concrete block walls were repainted in Benjamin Moore’s Chantilly Lace during the renovation.
The view from the opposite end, where an additional loft area is used as the children’s bedroom. Plywood ceilings complement the hardwood floors below.
The versatile space was designed for both private and public uses. A raised platform provides storage and seating along one side of the room.
The built-in sofa anchors the living room and faces the existing fireplace. The Leather Oval Chair with a red steel base sits off to the side, and the coffee table was fashioned by attaching vintage steel legs to another tile sample board.
Plenty of natural light comes in via the rear glass wall.
A timber staircase accesses the loft-like office and is wider at the bottom, where it doubles as shelving.
A look at one of two bedrooms located in the loft area. Windows frame views of the surrounding landscape and brighten the space with the warmth of natural lighting.
The wood-wrapped alcove produces "an intimate space for the sofa," says Preda, and seamlessly integrates the support pillars into the design.
Boiserie panels made of zebrawood create a cozy nook in the main living area and also form a picture rail to display the client’s art collection.
Preda elegantly reallocated the space to contain a side-by-side living room and dining room area, with the latter defined by a custom Cor-Ten steel and zebrawood bookcase designed by the firm. The dining table is by Alepreda for miduny, the firm’s sister furniture company. The fireplace is an ethanol model, since incorporating a chimney wasn’t possible in the building.
After two years at sea with their family of five, a couple continues their tiny house lifestyle by renovating a rundown Airstream.
The bus has a seating area, kitchen, and bed propped over the “garage,” where the couple stores their gear. Mande did all the sewing herself, using foam from the old seats to make the built-in couches. “This is a space for slowing down, simplifying, and clearing the mind,” say the couple.
Shalina Kell is a graphic designer and a maker—and now she can add "tiny home builder" to her resume. The single mom lives with her teenage daughter in a lovely, light-filled, 350-square-foot tiny home in Sacramento that she built and designed herself.
At a 1954 midcentury home in the West hills of Portland, Penny Black Interiors deftly updated the residence with standout cabinetry, carefully-selected tile, and wallpaper galore. The renovation balanced preserving the home's innate character and updating its function for modern life.
The original fireplace in the sitting room, which features colorful inlaid tiles, was restored and tall oak shelving was added to either side. "This room is a successful mix of classic period and relaxed Australian styles," says architect Sarah Bryant.
"Small IKEA kitchens drive me crazy, but six kitchens' worth of IKEA cabinets can be made into something beautiful," says homeowner Andrew Dunbar. Staggered by width, the cabinets have exposed kick-plate gaps for storing CDs.
McCrae House 1
The dining room features a tongue-and- groove Douglas fir ceiling. Original built-ins include a mahogany bench anchored between cabinets whose fronts tilt at the house’s signature 15-degree angle.
The revamped loft has a Sunflower clock by Irving Harper for George Nelson Associates atop bookshelves built by John. A Finn Juhl side table appears here and in the living room.
The best-known furnishings made by Sticotti’s studio are bookshelves suspended from a wooden rail. They appear in the second-floor living room.
Adding in live-edge details via countertops, freestanding furniture pieces, or built-in shelves is something that O’Donnell enjoys. "It’s fun to come up with uses for funky live edges and incorporate that into the design and still make it functional," he says.
Bright pops of colored materials that are tufted and quilted are unique to GAN.
Living Area
Living Area

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.