112 Living Room Medium Hardwood Floors Storage Design Photos And Ideas

A timber staircase accesses the loft-like office and is wider at the bottom, where it doubles as shelving.
A look at one of two bedrooms located in the loft area. Windows frame views of the surrounding landscape and brighten the space with the warmth of natural lighting.
The wood-wrapped alcove produces "an intimate space for the sofa," says Preda, and seamlessly integrates the support pillars into the design.
Boiserie panels made of zebrawood create a cozy nook in the main living area and also form a picture rail to display the client’s art collection.
Preda elegantly reallocated the space to contain a side-by-side living room and dining room area, with the latter defined by a custom Cor-Ten steel and zebrawood bookcase designed by the firm. The dining table is by Alepreda for miduny, the firm’s sister furniture company. The fireplace is an ethanol model, since incorporating a chimney wasn’t possible in the building.
After two years at sea with their family of five, a couple continues their tiny house lifestyle by renovating a rundown Airstream.
Shalina Kell is a graphic designer and a maker—and now she can add "tiny home builder" to her resume. The single mom lives with her teenage daughter in a lovely, light-filled, 350-square-foot tiny home in Sacramento that she built and designed herself.
At a 1954 midcentury home in the West hills of Portland, Penny Black Interiors deftly updated the residence with standout cabinetry, carefully-selected tile, and wallpaper galore. The renovation balanced preserving the home's innate character and updating its function for modern life.
The original fireplace in the sitting room, which features colorful inlaid tiles, was restored and tall oak shelving was added to either side. "This room is a successful mix of classic period and relaxed Australian styles," says architect Sarah Bryant.
"Small IKEA kitchens drive me crazy, but six kitchens' worth of IKEA cabinets can be made into something beautiful," says homeowner Andrew Dunbar. Staggered by width, the cabinets have exposed kick-plate gaps for storing CDs.
McCrae House 1
The dining room features a tongue-and- groove Douglas fir ceiling. Original built-ins include a mahogany bench anchored between cabinets whose fronts tilt at the house’s signature 15-degree angle.
The revamped loft has a Sunflower clock by Irving Harper for George Nelson Associates atop bookshelves built by John. A Finn Juhl side table appears here and in the living room.
The best-known furnishings made by Sticotti’s studio are bookshelves suspended from a wooden rail. They appear in the second-floor living room.
Malik asked architects Douglas Segulja and Margot Otten to raise the living area to set it off from the rest of the open-plan space; the first floor was previously all on one level. Against the wall is a reupholstered 1960s Milo Baughman seating unit. The sofa bench and coffee table are also by Baughman. The hanging fireplace is by Fireorb.
Adding in live-edge details via countertops, freestanding furniture pieces, or built-in shelves is something that O’Donnell enjoys. "It’s fun to come up with uses for funky live edges and incorporate that into the design and still make it functional," he says.
Bright pops of colored materials that are tufted and quilted are unique to GAN.
Living Area
Living Area
The existing living room received modern built-in storage and blue paint that syncs with the addition.
The wood paneling continues all throughout the home, creating a stylish, uniformed aesthetic. The living area contains a plush couch, as well as built-in closet space and shelving. The small bedroom is located toward the back, featuring a nicely sized window that opens up to a smaller deck. The bathroom is also sited in the back.
Leaving the ceiling unfinished adds to the material contrasts and saved money. Says Knight, "One example of a cost-effective strategy that also balanced the aesthetic qualities of the house is how we chose to forgo drywall on the ceilings. We paid more for the insulation to go above the rafters at the roof, but we gained this back in not using drywall and venting in the second-floor ceilings."
To Claire Thomas, it was a perfect time capsule with wood-clad walls, a hidden bar, room dividers, and a chrome-edged streamlined kitchen.
The original fireplace was cleaned up and repaired. "Also, the room previously had just a small passageway to the kitchen and no real place to put a television. We’re not big TV watchers, so we wanted to keep the mantle TV-free, so that it was not a focal point of the room," says Valencia. "We opened up the passage to the kitchen to give the home a modern layout and added a built-in TV/media cabinet (on the left wall)."
White paint considerably brightens up the space, and now the living room overlooks the pool.
The living area features Roche Bobois furnishings and a rug made from the farm’s sheep wool. Not pictured is the central fireplace built of locally quarried stone.
The simple form of the Dog Room lets it blend in with a range of styles, for interior or exterior use.
A Juliette balcony with double French doors allows the ocean breezes to fill this stylish retreat, which has high, vaulted ceilings.
As an architect who specializes in universal access design and ADA compliance and as a wheelchair user herself, Karen Braitmayer was no stranger to the challenges of accessible design. Although she had been able to take advantage of her 1954 home's single-level, open layout, as her daughter (also a wheelchair user) grew up, the family's accessibility needs also shifted. The main living area includes a more formal sitting area near the entrance, the dining area, Braitmayer’s workspace, and the kitchen—you can see the couple’s daughter working at the island. In the foreground is a pair of midcentury chairs; at left is a Heywood-Wakefield that Braitmayer found at an antiques shop. Seattle-based designer Lucy Johnson completed the interiors. The windows are from Lindal, and the exterior doors are from Marvin.
The brushed brass drawer pulls are from Amazon.
The design team sought to make rooms feel more like apartments, and so included reading nooks and hangout spots throughout, mixing jewel-toned furnishings with vintage finds and rock-and-roll ephemera.
The mansion has multiple spaces for entertaining, including this light-filled living room with bay windows.
A boldly patterned black-and-white cabinet is the star of this stair hall and entryway, which has accents of rich golds that shine against a neutral taupe wall. Sculptural light fixtures also help give the space a sense of personality and richness.
A staircase leads to Kell's loft.
“I loved the challenge of planning a fully functional home on a 32 ft x 8.5 ft trailer. I knew I wanted to include all of the basic living spaces that you would find in a conventional home: kitchen, living room, bathroom, two enclosed bedrooms, a laundry area, and storage spaces,” explains Kell.
Breakfast bar seating lies next to a tiny, efficient kitchen.
Lim + Lu decided to bring elements of nature into the space, transforming this new home into a haven to escape from the fast-paced lifestyle of the hustle and bustle of Hong Kong. The view of offices and apartments across the street from the living room windows are replaced by a row of lush greenery.
The use of light colors on the walls and ceiling of The Pacific Pioneer by Handcrafted Movement keeps the two lofted sleeping spaces at either end of the tiny home from feeling claustrophobic, while the blues, greens, and natural wood of the furniture and cabinetry are simple but thoughtful.
At one end of the tiny home is the living area, with seating on casters for mobility and a lofted bed. Storage has sliding doors for access and covers the wheel well; the leaves of the cabinet can also be flipped horizontally to create a table. The lofted bed can be lowered with the push of a button, and a coffee table doubles as a step stool.
The muted guestroom palette makes way for white oak subtly trimmed in Shinola blue.
Cozy textures like rattan and fur give each apartment complex a homely feel.
On the second floor, the Megacabinet culminates in a desk with a buffet and a wine fridge, as well as a sofa with hidden storage.
Antique Belgian chairs upholstered in Pindler fabric offer extra seating.
The airy living room shows off a monochrome landscape by Petros Koublis framed by an Interior Define sectional and Verellen coffee table. Extra accents include a floor lamp by Bungalow Decor in Westport, block print pillows by Susan Connor, aerrain plant pot, and black urns by Habitat Greenwich. Tying the space together is a rug from Restoration Hardware.
Broden gave the formerly low-ceilinged living room a high pitch and added more windows for light. For the floors, Lena chose salvaged oak hand-laid in a herringbone pattern. The Roar + Rabbit dresser is from West Elm.
In the living room, the wood and concrete shell is accented with a steel stair railing and a window wall with a Mondrian pattern in the glazing.
The home has the feel of a time capsule.
When the husband-and-wife team behind Austin-based Co(X)ist Studio set out to remodel their 1962 ranch-style house, they wanted to update it to suit their modern lifestyles—as well as demonstrate the design sensibilities of their young firm. The original home was dim, compartmentalized, and disconnected from the outdoors. Architects Frank and Megan Lin opened up the floor plan, created an addition, and built an expansive back porch, using several reclaimed materials in the process.
Luceplan Counterbalance floor lamp and Ditre Italia sofa.
Buble Blob sofa, Duke coffee table, and black leather Pelle Plus chair by Arketipo.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.