407 Living Room Medium Hardwood Floors Coffee Tables Design Photos And Ideas

The cozy sitting area, complete with a rotatable fireplace, is an ideal writer's retreat.
By the Saey fireplace, a wicker chair from Malawi echoes the lines of Pinch’s Willo table. Matching other pieces to their line “is not an exact science,” Oona says, “just an innate reaction to things we love.”
A continuous deck or veranda, called engawa in Japanese, functions as both a step and seat, to seamlessly connect the house to the garden. Deep eaves, or hisashi, provide cover and reflect light from the interior.
Interior spaces, such as the main living area, deliberately frame exterior views. Per the architects: "Thus, the beautiful oak trees on the opposite side of the creek are still 'belonging' to this house by the use of a technique called shakkei or borrowed scenery—to expand limits visually."
This built-in seating area backs a dividing wall that sets off the kitchen and faces a brick inlay fireplace.
The home features built-ins like this bookshelf in the living space.
Sliding glass doors lead out to the pool.
The home has the feel of a time capsule.
Prominent windows provide views of the surrounding cityscape and plenty of natural light.
The open-concept living space is filled with natural light.
Built as a warehouse, this 2,200-square-foot, one-bedroom home in East London kept its original layout, but now has an open bedroom on the mezzanine level.
This bright suite features a furnished balcony.
Upside-down triangles appear throughout the hotel. These symbols of feminine power and strength are featured in the original YWCA logo.
A highly curated collection of artwork adorns the vibrant lobby, which is richly textured with dark woods, lush jewel-toned velvets, brass, and leather. A work by Jesse Mockrin hangs above the hearth.
The skylights in the hotel's lobby were old, dirty, and "a little bit decrepit," according to Goldstein. The updated space is filled with light and buzzing with creativity.
The soaring vaulted ceiling and the spirit of the living room were preserved, and the entire lower level was enhanced by opening up the space, creating a smooth flow from the living room into the kitchen and dining areas.
Although the spaces have been updated, the home's midcentury style shines through.
Inside, the focus remains on the landscape and the surroundings. The living space leads to a screened-in porch overlooking a reflecting pool and greenery.
The floor-to-ceiling windows are made from tempered glass that can withstand temperatures up to 450 degrees. The windows provide stunning views from the Sunset Strip to the ocean.
The floor-to-ceiling windows and sliders create seamless indoor/outdoor connection.
The tongue-and-groove ceiling is another classic midcentury feature.
The open-plan living space is anchored by a grand dual-sided fireplace. Extensive glazing brings a strong sense of the outdoors in and keeps the interiors bright and airy.
An Acucraft fireplace divides the family room from the living room. The interior flooring is also by Madera-Trade.
An inside peek of the Davis House. As a full-service firm, Risa's practice also handles interior design.
Windows and natural light surround the living room with a locally made Haiku Home ceiling fan.
Notice the striking ceiling joists, which are supported by traditional criss-cross braces.
Eco-friendly features like solar panels and rainwater catchments keep this retreat's environmental footprint small. Immediately to the right of the entry is the main living space, which features a Jetmaster 700D wood-burning fireplace with a tiled hearth.
A Muuto couch in the living room.
Luise Stauss, a former photo editor at The New York Times Magazine,  sits in the living room of the downtown Brooklyn apartment she shares with her husband, Nicholas Blechman, the creative director of The New Yorker. The roughly 1,000-square-foot space feels larger than it is, thanks to high ceilings and bay windows. Twin 1962 Bastiano sofas by Tobia Scarpa are joined by a Cité chair by Jean Prouvé and a wood chair acquired from the New York Historical Society. The floor lamp is by David Weeks Studio.
When the husband-and-wife team behind Austin-based Co(X)ist Studio set out to remodel their 1962 ranch-style house, they wanted to update it to suit their modern lifestyles—as well as demonstrate the design sensibilities of their young firm. The original home was dim, compartmentalized, and disconnected from the outdoors. Architects Frank and Megan Lin opened up the floor plan, created an addition, and built an expansive back porch, using several reclaimed materials in the process.
Jaipur Zinfandel carpet.
Buble Blob sofa, Duke coffee table, and black leather Pelle Plus chair by Arketipo.
"Because the living room occupies the gable, the resultant space is triangular in feel," Thompson says. So she heightened that look with an oversized triangle window, which maximizes views of the cove. Western red cedar was chosen for the walls, and three-inch red oak was chosen for the interior floors. The windows are encased in Alaskan Yellow Cedar.
The view from the kitchen to the living area above and atelier below.
"The wood adds warmth and consistency to the space, balancing the tough exterior," explains architect Harley Graham.
The Great Room is stylishly fitted out with a Holly Hunt coffee table, Stefan Heiliger "De Sede" chairs, Thayer Coggin Lloyd sofas, a Robert James Nantucket Occasional Table, and sconces by Lianne Gold for Ralph Pucci.
The massive, thermally broken steel windows were installed by crane.
The open-plan living areas feature rift sawn white-oak floors, teak ceilings, and plaster walls that provide a soft contrast to the hard steel-beams and lines.
White wood interiors help keep the home bright and airy.
The cozy living room has a modern bohemian sense of style but is still firmly anchored to the  home's past through the stone inlay hearth.
The living room features a Yucca Stuff coffee table as well as a sofa designed by Austin interior designer Ann Edgerton and built by Tyson Pendergrass.
The double-height living space is anchored by a wood-burning stove by Lopi in the corner. The large east-facing window on the far wall floods the room with magical morning light. All the windows and doors are by Quantum.
Scott set the windows into deep recesses.
In the open great room, large sliding glass doors from Fleetwood Windows & Doors blur the boundary between indoors and out.
A powder room is sandwiched between the dining room and den.
The living room is furnished with an Eames lounge and ottoman and a Line credenza by Nathan Yong. The fireplace, also painted by the last owner, is Wrought Iron by Benjamin Moore.
The updated kitchen offers contemporary living with a midcentury-modern vibe.
The living space has spectacular views thanks to the floor-to-ceiling wall of glass.
Interiors were designed by Kristin Kilmer Design, Inc.
The interiors lead to a large, covered terrace through generous sliding doors.
The apartment has been carefully configured to take full advantage of the 180-degree views of the city skyline.
The living and dining areas have been relocated closer to the fully glazed exterior walls, where they can now enjoy more light.
Now, common areas are concentrated around a right-angled section that follows the glazed window-walls.
In the living area,  Scott chose low-slung furnishings to enhance the feeling of space. The  chairs are by Block & Chisel, the coffee table is from Weylandts, and the sofas are by the architect.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.