114 Living Room Medium Hardwood Floors Rug Floors Ceiling Lighting Design Photos And Ideas

“We took a fair bit of influence from American Arts and Crafts houses, particularly in L.A., but with everything, I like to have a very Brisbane-centric end product,” says Wrightson.
Husband-and-wife founders of Calico Wallpaper Rachel and Nick Cope show how easy it can be to put a personal, design-led touch on loft living—even when it’s a rental. When the Copes rented a Red Hook loft in an industrial 1860s warehouse, the couple turned their rental into a testing ground for their marbleized wallpaper business and installed wallpaper in each of their rooms. The custom pieces take inspiration from the loft’s immediate surroundings and characteristics—from the silver-and-gold marbled mural that complements the loft’s exposed structural beams to a color-gradient wallpaper in the primary bedroom that takes cues from the sunset seen from Red Hook.
Sean Brown’s Toronto apartment is stacked with a collection of nostalgic magazines from the 90s and early 2000s, coordinating with his viral CD rugs.
Facing a COVID-19 shutdown, Taylor and Michaella McClendon recruited their family to build a breezy tiny home on the Big Island—which you can now purchase for $99,800.
The low-slung sofa, from Medley, is non-toxic—like almost all of the furnishings here. The kitchen, too, is built from non-toxic materials. “You could actually eat the stain we used for the floors,” says Christina. No- or low-VOC stains and sealers were used throughout, and the spray-foam insulation in the walls is also low-VOC.
The entrance foyer encapsulates the home’s themes of reuse—through the salvaged wood and metal gate—artisan furniture, and colourful abstraction. The Moroccan wall hanging is a vintage find, and the chairs and table are by local furniture designer Seth Keller. The industrial gate has been given a domestic twist with the addition of coat hooks for the client’s young child.
Canadian Castaway features a simple and rustic aesthetic with a focus on raw materials. "I didn’t want to paint the wood white, for instance," the owner says. "I just wanted to let it age naturally and invite it to mirror the natural world it's now a part of."
Beyond its sliding doors, this storybook barn in Gallatin is airy and filled with natural light, courtesy of old, quirky window sashes. Original wood from the vast, open structure—privacy awaits in the reading nook—has been re-imagined and bolstered by throw rugs and glamorous chandeliers. With views onto the pastoral meadow, alfresco grilling feasts around the deck’s hand-made black locust table are bound to become a nightly occurrence.
A Pampa rug from Argentina adorns this light-filled living room designed by Cortney Bishop.
Designer Cortney Bishop used antique Serapi rugs—a type of Persian carpet—that she sourced from a local dealer to guide the design of this residence in Knoxville, Tennessee.
The living room is anchored by a large concrete fireplace that also forms the house's robust structural system. Pops of color come from a painting by Milton Wilson.
In the richly hued living room, a Milo Baughman coffee table with a chrome base and custom marble top pairs with Milo Baughman barrel chairs that have been reupholstered in a saturated blue fabric. A custom velvet sofa adds another textured layer. A custom light fixture with crystal bulbs from The Future Perfect hangs like jewelry above the space, and a geometric painting by senior JHID designer Chelsie Lee ties the colors together.
Interior designer Nina Blair blends Ghanaian and Scandinavian influences in her family’s Tribeca apartment.
Built-in shelving in the ground-floor living area provides ample storage for books and records. “This is my favourite chair, where I like to sit and watch the fire or read a book,” says the owner.
A hammock chair in the living room overlooks the wood stove at the center and the sofa against the west wall, creating a cozy living space.
The main living area on the ground floor has 20-foot-high ceilings and an open floor plan. The high ceilings allow the 395-square-foot home to feel expansive, light, and breezy. In cold weather, the owner grows seedlings by the south-facing windows.
“I’ve been looking at cabins and small homes since I was a teenager,” says the owner. “I knew I wanted the home to have a small footprint, but for the interior space to still feel open and expansive.” This informed the interior planning, as he knew he didn’t want the upper floors to completely enclose the ground floor. By minimizing the second floor and including an open third-floor loft bedroom, he was able to maintain a spacious feeling and avoid making the interior spaces feel too enclosed.
The great room is designed for indoor/outdoor living. The floor-to-ceiling glass wall at the back of the space (which is just a slice of the all-glass rear) includes a bi-fold NanaWall door system that opens the home to an outdoor terrace and the lush surroundings.
A rendered peek inside a 2X lightHouse model.
The two living rooms at the front of the home sit on slightly different levels. The more formal living room features a linen sofa by Pure Interiors and classic CH22 and CH26 timber chairs by Hans J. Wegner for Carl Hansen & Son.
The casual living room on the ground floor features a vintage cane chair, a Togo sofa by Michel Ducaroy for Ligne Roset, and a portrait titled Matriarch by contemporary Danish artist Henrik Godsk.
A reading nook in the living room makes use of otherwise dead space and offers additional storage.
A timber window seat is surrounded by secret storage cabinets, adding functionality to otherwise unused space.
A recycled brick wall acts as the perfect backdrop to a custom media cabinet designed and built by Lisa Breeze.
Rudolph M. Schindler’s Kallis House, recently restored by homeowners Susan Orlean and John Gillespie, is often referred to as the Austrian-born architect’s late-period masterpiece. It makes use of the "Schindler frame," an adaptation that allowed him to design large glazed openings and thin ceilings and roofs. John, Susan, and their dog, Ivy, commune in the sitting area of the master bedroom. The Wide Angle Janus sofa by Edward Wormley for Dunbar Furniture, found by John’s mother at a thrift store with the original orange fabric intact, was purchased for less than $100, including delivery. The coffee table is by Isamu Noguchi and the 9-Light LED pendant is by Sonneman.
An open floor plan seamlessly weaves the home's main living areas together. Here, another look at the living room which features an exposed wood ceiling and beams.
This living room features a custom sofa and leather, brass, and hardwood armchairs by Atra Form. A cluster of coffee tables includes the Paloma painted steel coffee table designed by Pedro Ramirez Vazquez, a custom brushed brass side table by Atra Form, and the Telugu Suar stained wood side table by NAMUH.
The luminous parlor space features two working fireplaces (one wood, one gas). Original pocket doors provide optional separation of the living and dining areas.
Up the stairs is a light-filled living room which features Tasmanian oak flooring and 10-foot-tall ceilings. According the the listing, the couple "loved to host lively intellectual affairs with their circle of friends, global dignitaries, and artists" in this very space.
McCrae House 1
The bright pink and leopard print furnishings are reminiscent of Betsey's clothing line.
One of the highlights of the home is the glass bi-fold doors, which emphasize the L.A. residents' embrace of indoor-outdoor living.
Each home that Wright designed was unique to its circumstances, and the Penfield House was no exception. Set on 30 acres in Lake County, Ohio, the 1950 home has taller ceilings and an elongated profile to accommodate the client Louis Penfield—who was six foot eight.
A view of the living room and kitchen.
Bright pops of colored materials that are tufted and quilted are unique to GAN.
Beside one of the building's original stained-glass windows, a handmade "church banner" by Shelby Rodeffer pays homage to Dolly Parton, Loretta Lynn, and Tammy Wynette.
The living room, where a large industrial-style window facilitates plenty of sunlight.
Succulents and cacti fill a sun-drenched nook in the hallway.
A cozy, library-like reading area lies just off the dining area. The wood-burning fireplace has a gas starter.
Inside, the 4,043-square-foot property features reclaimed wood floors and beamed ceilings.
The kitchen overlooks an additional sitting area and a home office separated by glass doors.
The extra 14-inch ceiling height brings light and harbor views into the space, while transom windows add a bonus sky view.
Fotsch reframed the great room, adding 14
A warm, voluminous family room is located off the kitchen, overlooking beautiful ocean views.
Subtle curves introduced throughout the design, such as in the built-in casework and stone plinth, soften the geometric plan of the home.
Leaving the ceiling unfinished adds to the material contrasts and saved money. Says Knight, "One example of a cost-effective strategy that also balanced the aesthetic qualities of the house is how we chose to forgo drywall on the ceilings. We paid more for the insulation to go above the rafters at the roof, but we gained this back in not using drywall and venting in the second-floor ceilings."
There is also a lovely, light-filled, sitting area.
The light-filled parlor features two original wood and tile mantels (one at either end) and 11-foot ceilings.
The minimalist living room includes built-in seating.
As an architect who specializes in universal access design and ADA compliance and as a wheelchair user herself, Karen Braitmayer was no stranger to the challenges of accessible design. Although she had been able to take advantage of her 1954 home's single-level, open layout, as her daughter (also a wheelchair user) grew up, the family's accessibility needs also shifted. The main living area includes a more formal sitting area near the entrance, the dining area, Braitmayer’s workspace, and the kitchen—you can see the couple’s daughter working at the island. In the foreground is a pair of midcentury chairs; at left is a Heywood-Wakefield that Braitmayer found at an antiques shop. Seattle-based designer Lucy Johnson completed the interiors. The windows are from Lindal, and the exterior doors are from Marvin.
The living space is anchored by a brick-inlay fireplace with expansive glazing on either side, also a key Eichler feature.
The open-plan living area features soaring, vaulted ceilings thanks to the double A-frame design.
In addition to a wet bar and laundry room, the downstairs has a large, open space—once known as the children's living room—with a wood-burning fireplace and direct access to the grounds and pool.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.