53 Living Room Medium Hardwood Floors Rug Floors Storage Design Photos And Ideas

Large windows allow the lush, tropical garden to become a focus of the interior design. Ginger replaced the previous bulky shades with a sleek, motorized, exterior shade system. “They are on a timer,” she explains, “so that they automatically lower in the late afternoon for about four hours.”
A view from the kitchen out toward the living area provides a sense of the lofted interior.
Having spent more time at home in recent months, Nina and her family are truly experiencing the "essence" of her design, she says. Their library corner, a space that was once underused, has become a place of respite for the family where they can gather on the Nanimarquina Rangoli rug and listen to records.
Whitney updated the living room by employing a light palette and rich textures. Beige linen covers the built-in sofa cushions; the pale tone maintains a feeling of spaciousness.
The New Project Group renovated a cramped, uninviting space on Manhattan’s Upper East Side. The company gave the 400-square-foot apartment a gut renovation, with a new kitchen and bathroom designed for efficiency. A parallelogram-shaped window pane, rescued from an architectural salvage yard, was outfitted with steel edges and casters, and repurposed as a coffee table.
The two living rooms at the front of the home sit on slightly different levels. The more formal living room features a linen sofa by Pure Interiors and classic CH22 and CH26 timber chairs by Hans J. Wegner for Carl Hansen & Son.
The casual living room on the ground floor features a vintage cane chair, a Togo sofa by Michel Ducaroy for Ligne Roset, and a portrait titled Matriarch by contemporary Danish artist Henrik Godsk.
A reading nook in the living room makes use of otherwise dead space and offers additional storage.
The bus has a seating area, kitchen, and bed propped over the “garage,” where the couple stores their gear. Mande did all the sewing herself, using foam from the old seats to make the built-in couches. “This is a space for slowing down, simplifying, and clearing the mind,” say the couple.
At a 1954 midcentury home in the West hills of Portland, Penny Black Interiors deftly updated the residence with standout cabinetry, carefully-selected tile, and wallpaper galore. The renovation balanced preserving the home's innate character and updating its function for modern life.
McCrae House 1
The dining room features a tongue-and- groove Douglas fir ceiling. Original built-ins include a mahogany bench anchored between cabinets whose fronts tilt at the house’s signature 15-degree angle.
The revamped loft has a Sunflower clock by Irving Harper for George Nelson Associates atop bookshelves built by John. A Finn Juhl side table appears here and in the living room.
Bright pops of colored materials that are tufted and quilted are unique to GAN.
Leaving the ceiling unfinished adds to the material contrasts and saved money. Says Knight, "One example of a cost-effective strategy that also balanced the aesthetic qualities of the house is how we chose to forgo drywall on the ceilings. We paid more for the insulation to go above the rafters at the roof, but we gained this back in not using drywall and venting in the second-floor ceilings."
The original fireplace was cleaned up and repaired. "Also, the room previously had just a small passageway to the kitchen and no real place to put a television. We’re not big TV watchers, so we wanted to keep the mantle TV-free, so that it was not a focal point of the room," says Valencia. "We opened up the passage to the kitchen to give the home a modern layout and added a built-in TV/media cabinet (on the left wall)."
White paint considerably brightens up the space, and now the living room overlooks the pool.
The living area features Roche Bobois furnishings and a rug made from the farm’s sheep wool. Not pictured is the central fireplace built of locally quarried stone.
As an architect who specializes in universal access design and ADA compliance and as a wheelchair user herself, Karen Braitmayer was no stranger to the challenges of accessible design. Although she had been able to take advantage of her 1954 home's single-level, open layout, as her daughter (also a wheelchair user) grew up, the family's accessibility needs also shifted. The main living area includes a more formal sitting area near the entrance, the dining area, Braitmayer’s workspace, and the kitchen—you can see the couple’s daughter working at the island. In the foreground is a pair of midcentury chairs; at left is a Heywood-Wakefield that Braitmayer found at an antiques shop. Seattle-based designer Lucy Johnson completed the interiors. The windows are from Lindal, and the exterior doors are from Marvin.
The brushed brass drawer pulls are from Amazon.
The design team sought to make rooms feel more like apartments, and so included reading nooks and hangout spots throughout, mixing jewel-toned furnishings with vintage finds and rock-and-roll ephemera.
Breakfast bar seating lies next to a tiny, efficient kitchen.
At one end of the tiny home is the living area, with seating on casters for mobility and a lofted bed. Storage has sliding doors for access and covers the wheel well; the leaves of the cabinet can also be flipped horizontally to create a table. The lofted bed can be lowered with the push of a button, and a coffee table doubles as a step stool.
Cozy textures like rattan and fur give each apartment complex a homely feel.
Antique Belgian chairs upholstered in Pindler fabric offer extra seating.
The airy living room shows off a monochrome landscape by Petros Koublis framed by an Interior Define sectional and Verellen coffee table. Extra accents include a floor lamp by Bungalow Decor in Westport, block print pillows by Susan Connor, aerrain plant pot, and black urns by Habitat Greenwich. Tying the space together is a rug from Restoration Hardware.
In the living room, the wood and concrete shell is accented with a steel stair railing and a window wall with a Mondrian pattern in the glazing.
The home has the feel of a time capsule.
Luceplan Counterbalance floor lamp and Ditre Italia sofa.
Buble Blob sofa, Duke coffee table, and black leather Pelle Plus chair by Arketipo.
Wilson transformed the interior of this 1974 airstream so it could be used for a variety of purposes, such as a dressing room for Iggy Pop and Beck during the Project Pabst Music Festival in Portland, Oregon.
The new addition had to flow seamlessly into the more traditional spaces of the home.
The living room boasts original wood paneled ceiling and walls, and beautiful built-in bookshelves.
In this house in the Mornington Peninsula in the south of Melbourne, materials like concrete, natural stone, steel and cedar are perfect backdrops for architecture and interior design firm SJB to use bold colors and edgy midcentury furniture.
Once the structural shell of a Deltec home is built, the interior is finished just as a traditionally constructed house would be.
All furnishings were purchased on a budget. The rug and Friheten sleeper sectional in the living room, the Luftig oven hood, Norrsjön sink, Sektion cabinetry, and countertop in the kitchen, and the small dining counter with Glenn bar stools were all sourced from IKEA.
Built in wood shelving sits below clerestory windows, opposite a large brick fireplace with a sculptural chute.  Expansive windows provide views of the Bay beyond.
Circa-1940s documents that were filed with the Los Angeles Department of Building and Safety credit William H. Thomas, who was a very close friend of graphic designer Alvin Lustig, as the house’s “certified architect.” After extensive research conducted by the home’s previous owner, Andy Hackman, the house’s current owner, Andrew Romano, believes the structure was in fact Lustig’s own design.
Remodeled by resident and interior decorator Jill McCoy and her husband David Hassall with the help of architect Paul Molina, the open-plan living space opens to a small outdoor area. French doors and a wall of windows bring in light. An Eames lounge chair and a Noguchi table add a modern sensibility.
The setup around the fireplace includes a sister piece in a neutral gray, coffee tables by Thomas Bentzen, and a Visu lounge chair by Mika Tolvanen, all for Muuto.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.