293 Living Room Light Hardwood Floors Recessed Lighting Design Photos And Ideas

The main living area features a black pellet stove in the corner and a raw-edge, white oak window seat, which add rustic elements to the clean, bright space.
The couch swing was the last element of The House to be designed. "I wanted something comfortable and unique, but not weird," says Tarah. "In a stroke of genius, Drew suggested a couch swing." The piece was made by the couple in the garage just days before the first booking and is one of the guests’ favorite features.
The living area is oriented around a floating window seat crafted from oak. "We wanted a place for guests to comfortably sit, read, and reflect in the beautiful Colorado surroundings," says Tarah. "We sourced the perfect slab of white oak from a local mill. We kept the edges raw and used a light, matte finish that highlighted the natural beauty without it being over saturated. I wanted it to feel as unfinished and natural as possible."
The fireplace was painted white and now has a wood stove installed (not shown). "Once we got the wood stove, the room just came to life and became super cozy," says Jocie.
The mezzanine level hosts the bedrooms and overlooks the lower living spaces.
Floor-to-ceiling glass doors that stretch 27 feet long connect the interior to the side patio.
Around the corner from the kitchen, a family room sits between the courtyard on one side and the backyard on the other.
A concealed door opens into the principal bedroom suite.
In the living room, an Era sofa from Lytle Pressley joins a Calder coffee table by Minotti and a Grand Repos armchair and ottoman by Antonio Citterio for Vitra. The fireplace is by Fireorb.
“The house went up so fast compared to a lot of buildings we do, because it’s such a simple design,” explains designer Tim Whitehill.
The mezzanine level was transformed into a family room, leaving the fireplace pretty much as is. A painting by Anyeley’s sister, Addoley Dzegede, hangs over a Thataway sofa by Blu Dot. Above the fireplace is a Frame TV by Samsung, displaying a piece by San Francisco artist Barry McGee.
The open-plan living area features rift-cut white oak flooring.
The concrete hearth at the fireplace has angled sidewalls and a bevelled edge.
The rear wall with stacking sliding doors opens to surrounding decks and the "hero" view.
Floor-to-ceiling shelves and storage bookend a cabinet that conceals the television.
The home’s interior is a fusion of glass and reclaimed redwood, the latter sourced from a nearby decommissioned airplane hangar.
The pair replaced the cluttered firewood storage with a floating hearth that can double as a seat and display for art.
Raj and Watts extended the fireplace column to the ceiling to highlight the room’s expansive scale, and had it coated in concrete plaster. It was important to retain the wood-burning fireplace—a rarity in the city—but “we wanted to re-clad it in a material that also spoke to the industrial past of the building,” says Raj.
Given the home’s tight and efficient footprint, the architects sought to use simple materials and strategic moves to delineate different spaces and uses. The lower ceiling height of the living room, for example, distinguishes it from the dining area, which has a taller ceiling.
The Kamp Haus cabin interiors are minimalist with large windows that take advantage of the views.
To extend the living room view, the architects used corner glass, eliminating the need to use a jamb or corner post that would have interrupted the landscape.
The light-filled living room features a Kasota limestone fireplace. The slab stones were “fleuri” cut across the grain for a swirl effect, then sandblasted to age.
The home is articulated along the ridge to command the highest point on the property, providing the clients with sweeping views across the rolling farmland.
The living room opens into the kitchen and a hallway that leads to the master bedroom suite. Deep-set skylights above the living space let in morning light from the east.
The floating oak staircase in the first-floor family room leads to the rooftop garden, which features a lounge area, grill, and small bar room with a restroom. Bespoke oak shelving behind the stair offers a display area for books and other objects.
The sunken living room created an opportunity for a bespoke joinery unit that can be used as a bench overlooking the courtyard as well as a storage space for books and objects. Topped with the same Iranian travertine marble that is used for the flooring in the entrance, it extends the hallway along the courtyard into the living room.
The family room on the second level.
The ceiling height was lowered over the seating area in the living room to create a cozy enclosure there, while double-height windows on the perimeter bring in yet more light.
A look back at the atrium on the left and the foyer on the right—sleek, built-in storage lines the entry on one side, opposite a two-sided fireplace.
The design team added new perimeter window openings to encourage light into the home wherever possible.
The wood-wrapped footbridge on the floor above defines the passage into the living room.
L&M Design Lab leveraged the diagonal axis of an L-shaped, 366-square-foot flat in Shanghai to make it feel more spacious, carving out room for everyone’s hobbies—including a mini singing hall. The home, which is on the top floor of an older building, can be traversed in just 13 steps from north to south, say the designers, giving the project its name, A House Within Thirteen Steps. This view shows the diagonal axis of the apartment, looking back to the kitchen.
Bean Buro’s Urban Cocoon draws inspiration from Japanese teahouses. This reference point can be felt at the entryway, which features light timber and slatted screens.
The custom-built shaker-style cabinets are made of ultralight plywood and topped with Glacier White Corian countertops.
The coffee table in the living area is an old trunk Ryan and Catherine found in a shed on their property.
The interior of the Airstream was reimagined using reclaimed materials. The flooring is made of old-growth Douglas fir, and the ceiling features yellow cedar sawmill offcuts. Ryan crafted the built-in sofa using more cedar sawmill offcuts, while Catherine sewed the drapery and the upholstery, using fabric she collected from various thrift shops and IKEA.
For the owners of the Jackson Residence—a retired couple with grown children—the completion of their contemporary rural home in Jackson, Wyoming, has been a long time coming. They acquired a sloped plot set amidst a dramatic landscape at the crest of the Gros Ventre Butte long ago—but they decided to wait until retirement before approaching Bohlin Cywinski Jackson to design and build their long-awaited forever abode.
Park City Design + Build created this indoor/outdoor, energy-efficient home for a Danish interior designer and her family.
Twenty-foot sliders flank the living/dining area, providing spectacular views in both directions. The painting is by Randi Mork-Ulnes, Casper’s mother.
Floor-to-ceiling windows look out onto the woods and meadow surrounding the home. The stove is by Hwam.
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New HVAC systems also improved the air quality and humidity in the home.
The coffee table can fold out and double as a dining table. The bathroom also has a folding door to save space.
A hand-finished, rammed-earth feature wall references the Danxia Landform Geological Park in the homeowners’ native Zhangye, which boasts striated, rainbow-colored mountains. It also acts as a sound buffer with the neighbors.
Now, a folding wood wall separates the living room from the master bedroom area. The designers also created a mezzanine above the living room that hosts the daughter’s playroom and can be accessed by a rolling ladder. The door to the right leads to the new bathroom.
Huge header beams and thickened walls allow for a generous opening between the living room and deck, with doors that recess into the wall cavity and a seamless meeting between the indoor floor and the exterior decking.
The original living room was converted into an open-plan kitchen and dining area with a living room that can be reconfigured into a bedroom. The use of natural materials and the large windows that flood the space with natural light and frame the views make the small space feel bright and airy.
Boasting 18,500 square feet, the sleek residence is spread across three levels. A free-flowing layout allows the main living areas to seamlessly connect among the middle floor.
The living room holds a Freemood sofa by Desiree Divani, a solid wood coffee table by Sonja, and a Fork floor lamp by Diesel Living with Foscarini.
LED lighting playfully highlights the zig-zag form created where the timber stairs met the wall.
An expansive glass door trimmed in vertical grain fir opens the interior to the refreshed deck. The designers made sure to keep the frame around the doors thin, in order to capture views and convey the minimal detailing of the original midcentury home. “All those details that go into keeping that eastern window wall as open and permeable as possible kept the essence of the original house, increased the indoor/outdoor connection, and retained that character that we and the owners had responded to in the house,” says Griesmeyer.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.