263 Living Room Light Hardwood Floors Recessed Lighting Design Photos And Ideas

The floating oak staircase in the first-floor family room leads to the rooftop garden, which features a lounge area, grill, and small bar room with a restroom. Bespoke oak shelving behind the stair offers a display area for books and other objects.
The sunken living room created an opportunity for a bespoke joinery unit that can be used as a bench overlooking the courtyard as well as a storage space for books and objects. Topped with the same Iranian travertine marble that is used for the flooring in the entrance, it extends the hallway along the courtyard into the living room.
The family room on the second level.
The ceiling height was lowered over the seating area in the living room to create a cozy enclosure there, while double-height windows on the perimeter bring in yet more light.
A look back at the atrium on the left and the foyer on the right—sleek, built-in storage lines the entry on one side, opposite a two-sided fireplace.
The design team added new perimeter window openings to encourage light into the home wherever possible.
The wood-wrapped footbridge on the floor above defines the passage into the living room.
L&M Design Lab leveraged the diagonal axis of an L-shaped, 366-square-foot flat in Shanghai to make it feel more spacious, carving out room for everyone’s hobbies—including a mini singing hall. The home, which is on the top floor of an older building, can be traversed in just 13 steps from north to south, say the designers, giving the project its name, A House Within Thirteen Steps. This view shows the diagonal axis of the apartment, looking back to the kitchen.
Bean Buro’s Urban Cocoon draws inspiration from Japanese teahouses. This reference point can be felt at the entryway, which features light timber and slatted screens.
The custom-built shaker-style cabinets are made of ultralight plywood and topped with Glacier White Corian countertops.
The coffee table in the living area is an old trunk Ryan and Catherine found in a shed on their property.
The interior of the Airstream was reimagined using reclaimed materials. The flooring is made of old-growth Douglas fir, and the ceiling features yellow cedar sawmill offcuts. Ryan crafted the built-in sofa using more cedar sawmill offcuts, while Catherine sewed the drapery and the upholstery, using fabric she collected from various thrift shops and IKEA.
For the owners of the Jackson Residence—a retired couple with grown children—the completion of their contemporary rural home in Jackson, Wyoming, has been a long time coming. They acquired a sloped plot set amidst a dramatic landscape at the crest of the Gros Ventre Butte long ago—but they decided to wait until retirement before approaching Bohlin Cywinski Jackson to design and build their long-awaited forever abode.
Park City Design + Build created this indoor/outdoor, energy-efficient home for a Danish interior designer and her family.
Twenty-foot sliders flank the living/dining area, providing spectacular views in both directions. The painting is by Randi Mork-Ulnes, Casper’s mother.
Floor-to-ceiling windows look out onto the woods and meadow surrounding the home. The stove is by Hwam.
2020 is canceled due to the Coronavirus—but here’s your opportunity to take advantage of time spent at home.
New HVAC systems also improved the air quality and humidity in the home.
The coffee table can fold out and double as a dining table. The bathroom also has a folding door to save space.
A hand-finished, rammed-earth feature wall references the Danxia Landform Geological Park in the homeowners’ native Zhangye, which boasts striated, rainbow-colored mountains. It also acts as a sound buffer with the neighbors.
Now, a folding wood wall separates the living room from the master bedroom area. The designers also created a mezzanine above the living room that hosts the daughter’s playroom and can be accessed by a rolling ladder. The door to the right leads to the new bathroom.
Huge header beams and thickened walls allow for a generous opening between the living room and deck, with doors that recess into the wall cavity and a seamless meeting between the indoor floor and the exterior decking.
Boasting 18,500 square feet, the sleek residence is spread across three levels. A free-flowing layout allows the main living areas to seamlessly connect among the middle floor.
The living room holds a Freemood sofa by Desiree Divani, a solid wood coffee table by Sonja, and a Fork floor lamp by Diesel Living with Foscarini.
LED lighting playfully highlights the zig-zag form created where the timber stairs met the wall.
An expansive glass door trimmed in vertical grain fir opens the interior to the refreshed deck. The designers made sure to keep the frame around the doors thin, in order to capture views and convey the minimal detailing of the original midcentury home. “All those details that go into keeping that eastern window wall as open and permeable as possible kept the essence of the original house, increased the indoor/outdoor connection, and retained that character that we and the owners had responded to in the house,” says Griesmeyer.
Now, the furniture grouping comfortably occupies the living room. A sectional from Gus Modern sits with a custom steel coffee table and a Paulistano armchair.
A minimal material palette is a hallmark of Evoke International Design’s projects.
Designed by Studio B Architecture + Interiors, this modern farmhouse in Aspen allows a couple’s art collection to shine with understated finishes and materials. Views and natural light were maximized via large spans of glass to instill a sense of airiness while the same wood used throughout the home added warmth. The minimalist interiors provide a muted canvas for their artifacts collected from travels to Africa and Indonesia, and art which includes 8-foot wooden sculptures, baskets from around the world, and Native American pieces including from R.C. Gorman.
When the current owners laid eyes on this home's spectacular city views, they instantly fell in love with the 1958 dwelling. In addition to amazing vistas, the custom-designed house had an authentic midcentury vibe and a cool chevron floor plan. However, the 3,600 square foot home had tiny, closed-off rooms, awkward spaces, and low ceilings that were "begging to be vaulted." Portland-based Risa Boyer Architecture renovated the midcentury house, opening up ceilings to make them vaulted, adding floor-to-ceiling windows, and expanded the kitchen and gave it a modern look with walnut cabinets.
“Versus a flat ceiling or a flat roof, when you have that bolted ridge above you, it creates a completely other type of interior experience for the client, which we find people love, we love ourselves, and it is much more human,” says Klymson.
Ladder to loft adds a playful element.
A hand-cut stone fireplace anchors one corner of the living room, which offers space for several seating areas. Long stretches of wall space also create the perfect canvas for displaying artwork.
As their primary residence for many years, Rubin and Hattis filled the home with an expansive collection of art. The living room features a two-story, barrel-vaulted ceiling and wrap-around clerestory windows, all of which cast dramatic angles of light into the space.
Add/Subtract House by Matt Fajkus Architecture | Photo by Charles Davis Smith
Add/Subtract House by Matt Fajkus Architecture | Photo by Charles Davis Smith
Inside the guest house, exposed beams along the rafters create a barn-like atmosphere, which is enhanced by a double-sided fireplace. Large sliding doors provide natural air circulation and enhance the indoor-outdoor connection.
One big change was to remove a fireplace at the side of the living room, says Liang, shown seated in the chair: "It was blocking the space, the flow from indoor to outdoor on the lower patio."
The architects incorporated sustainably sourced parota wood into the living room’s sunken seating area. The Turn Tall side table is from Blu Dot, and the pillows are from West Elm.
A view looking from the kitchen to the open family room, which is outfitted with sofas by Perez Furniture. Above, interior windows in the upstairs bedrooms look out onto the double-height dining area and a view out of the giant window wall.
The living area has a direct connection to the outdoors via a custom-made retractable wall of glass that leads to the backyard, a perfect spot for alfresco dining.
A skylight brings additional natural light into the open-plan living space. The gray, combed basalt fireplace figures prominently, as does built-in wood cabinetry.
The Artichoke light in bronze from Louis Poulsen joins Vitra cork stools and leather couches from Borge Mogensen.
Designed as a place to relax and take in the view, the living area features a custom sectional covered in fabric by Kravet and swivel chairs in fabric by Brentano. "Everything is family-friendly,” says Kendra. “We weren’t just designing for beauty—it had to be functional.” The custom table was finished with teak paper cord. The sconce is by Allied Maker.
In the living room, reclaimed white oak beams clearly mark where the wall stops and the gables begin. The <span style="font-family: Theinhardt, -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, &quot;Segoe UI&quot;, Roboto, Oxygen-Sans, Ubuntu, Cantarell, &quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;, sans-serif;">Sofa and rug are from Restoration Hardware.</span><span style="font-family: Theinhardt, -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, &quot;Segoe UI&quot;, Roboto, Oxygen-Sans, Ubuntu, Cantarell, &quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;, sans-serif;"> </span>
Front entry and living area.
Neutral setting let the view of the city come to play.
Stone and wood veneer block define the space without separate it.
View from living room toward kitchen and dinning rooms.   This view demonstrates a home where living spaces are both open and defined, expansive and broken down in to more intimate parts

Sofa: Bonaldo Slab Plus Sofa  
Coffee Table: Accursio La Cividina 
Art: Out of the Darkness by Catherine Schmid
Woodburning Stove: Morso
View from the kitchen looking towards rear yard and mudroom.  Hidden doors conceal access to the powder room and the mudroom and its access to the rear deck, yard and parking, placing greater priority on the relationship between interior and exterior living spaces. 

Chair: Bonaldo Blazer Lounge Chair
Lamp: Cattelan Italia Lampo
Minimal, Scandinavian-inspired furnishings fill the Dunn House in Toronto.
A pop-out nook on the second floor provides a cozy place to curl up with a book.
Cable railings extend across the open loft area, while open shelving houses colorful art.
The kitchen is tucked underneath a children’s playroom, creating a more intimate feeling that contrasts with a soaring ceiling in the family room.
Melanie Gaither Interiors selected light, beachy furnishing and finishes to match the view outside Haystack Rock Getaway. A deck outside the living room extends the connection to the ocean.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.