206 Living Room Light Hardwood Floors Floor Lighting Design Photos And Ideas

Cori’s 12-foot-long Paradise painting adds a dramatic touch to the living room.
In the living room, a Söderhamn sectional sofa from IKEA joins a Molded Plastic Rocker by Charles and Ray Eames for Herman Miller and a Jøtul stove. The burlap pillows were crafted by Cori out of coffee bean sacks. “She has ideas about making stuff that I would never think of,” says Craig.
The living room holds a Freemood sofa by Desiree Divani, a solid wood coffee table by Sonja, and a Fork floor lamp by Diesel Living with Foscarini.
Skylights punctuate the ceiling, flooding the dining and living areas with natural light.
A central feature of the space are the stacked stone walls, which line all three sides of the room and feature original inscriptions from local workers.
On the opposite side of the entry hall is the living room. A double fronted log burner sits within the stone chimney at the center of the space.
The active family had just returned from a three-year stint in Amsterdam and wanted a low-maintenance weekend retreat that would "give us energy and not take it away," explains Sara, who is the president of vintage-inspired home decor company Schoolhouse.
When the current owners laid eyes on this home's spectacular city views, they instantly fell in love with the 1958 dwelling. In addition to amazing vistas, the custom-designed house had an authentic midcentury vibe and a cool chevron floor plan. However, the 3,600 square foot home had tiny, closed-off rooms, awkward spaces, and low ceilings that were "begging to be vaulted." Portland-based Risa Boyer Architecture renovated the midcentury house, opening up ceilings to make them vaulted, adding floor-to-ceiling windows, and expanded the kitchen and gave it a modern look with walnut cabinets.
Another view of the home's extensive vaulted ceilings. An archway houses the main staircase, which leads to the second level and is gracefully lit by original stained glass.
Floor lamps by Habitat and Muuto light up the living room; the gray Can armchairs are by Hay. Here and in the kitchen, the ceiling’s plaster coat was removed to reveal the concrete underneath.
Midcentury completists score the ultimate catch: a 1959 post-and-beam fixer-upper in which to showcase their sprawling collection.
With the renovation finished a few months ago, the young family is finally ready to enjoy their home.
"We used a simple material palette—western red cedar, blackened steel, and glass—which helps create a timeless design," architect John Lum says.
Vaulted ceilings enliven the second-floor lounge area.
The kitchen is tucked underneath a children’s playroom, creating a more intimate feeling that contrasts with a soaring ceiling in the family room.
The home is filled with magnificent features—such as 10-foot-wide motorized windows that frame breathtaking views in three directions.
The open kitchen overlooks the living room.
The outside is brought in with double-height NLT (nail-laminated timber) ceilings and automated clerestory windows.
A collection of artful furnishings rounds out the scheme in Loft Ninho. The cool gray Saccaro sofa and rug by Domdaqui Tapetes balance out the wood tones, while a spectrum of green accents, starting with the mint trim, bring welcome pops of contrast.
The couple purchased the living room’s H.W. Klein chairs with the house. Another existing piece was the mezzanine’s daybed, designed by Peter Hvidt and Orlando Mølgaard Nielsen. An original floating staircase leads to the mezzanine and then up to the second floor. The open, straight-forward spaces speak to one of Christian’s guiding principles: “Simplicity is the key,” he says.
The living area—or “dance floor,” as the Womersley family called it—has an expansive feel, thanks to high ceilings and full-length windows.
The living room in the cabin melds contemporary furnishings with rustic elements like the Capital Lighting 4912BI-000 Pearson chandeliers.
Built in the early 1970s, the house's kitchen, living, and dining areas were originally divided into three distinct zones. In order for this great room to flow as one, Klopf Architecture removed the glass doors and solid walls separating the enclosed atrium from the kitchen and living room.  A Herman Miller trade poster, Design Within Reach book tower, and IKEA sofa mingle in the space.
The clients restored the living room's marble fireplace and painted the grate Benjamin Moore Black. New crown molding was added and the walls painted Sherwin Williams Origami White.
Jason lounges in one of two armchairs by midcentury designer Milo Baughman in the parlor-floor living room. The wood block coffee table is by Eric Slayton, a friend of the couple, and the modular Carmo sofa is from BoConcept. A 1952 piece by French industrial designer Serge Mouille, the Three-Arm Floor Lamp—widely referred to as the "Praying Mantis," for its looming trio of arms—is a nod to the couple’s love of Parisian interiors; a branch-like chandelier by Los Angeles–based artist Gary Chapman hangs overhead.
In the living room, the design team poured concrete in place using smooth board formwork to create the seamless fireplace.
When set up as a rental unit, a KODA Concrete can accommodate two guests in the sleeping area and another two on a convertible sofa in the living area.
Spaces flow freely from one to the next, creating a continuous open floor plan.
Walnut casework anchors both sides of the original fireplace. Steel plate provides a modern interpretation of the traditional hearth.
The bright and airy interiors are a mix of lightly colored oak floors juxtaposed again dark fixtures and exposed steel beams.
Oak floors, neutral furnishings, and an area rug by Han Feng for Tai Ping warm the office, as does the view of surrounding treetops. “You really feel as if you’re in the canopy,” says architect Takashi Yanai. A vintage Louis Vuitton trunk serves as a coffee table.
"The brick column works like a solar clock, and everything revolves it," says Pardo. "The modulations of light are reflected on it. Through the shadows you can know approximately what time of day it is, and also perceive the changes of the seasons."
The common area in this penthouse by Studio RHE boasts a digital cube ceiling, stunning views, and an immense book collection by the bar.
The open-plan living space is anchored by a black brick fireplace with a sleek modern profile. Muddox makes the commercial wire-cut thin bricks in ebony with liquid black added to the mortar mix. The Studio Floor Lamp is from Schoolhouse.
Alpine Noir by Casework
The loft presents oversized windows at the two extreme ends of the long and narrow floor plan, as is typical of the proportions of SoHo's loft buildings. Wide plank oak flooring runs the nearly 100' length of the loft, and was sealed with a European oil finish to match the hues of the client's cherished cat, Andrew Wintour.
The living room features a sectional sofa and leather chair by Zanotta, coffee tables by Porro, a Kymo rug, and a floor lamp from Flos.
The burgundy sofa mirrors the brick facade outside, providing a moment of color against the otherwise neutral colors.
The brown leather couch is low enough to allow lots of light to filter into the room, but it also has a masculine edge and modern, clean lines.
The loft features high ceilings and tall windows that provide lots of daylight. Charette selected and arranged furniture to complement these features.
The design consists of pieces with a masculine edge in neutral tones, with focused pops of color inspired by views out the windows of nearby buildings.
Le LAD whitewashed and preserved this stone wall to serve as a reminder of the building’s heritage.
The row of storage continues into the living area. The sofa and ceramic coffee table are both from French designer Christophe Delcourt. The gray wall lamp is from Le Corbusier and the paper lantern is by Isamu Noguchi.
The main floor is arranged as one long, contiguous space, with a living area and balcony at the front end. An Aulia coffee table by Henk Vos, a pair of red Eames molded plywood chairs, and a Pelican chair by Finn Juhl center the space.
On the lower level is the living lounge where Falck can relax and look out at nature through a massive window that is spread across the two floors.
The light-filled living room, with its view of the Manhattan Bridge, gets extra wattage from an Anglepoise Giant lamp. A pair  of Talma armchairs by Moroso face  a walnut coffee table designed  by Dash Marshall and constructed  by Harlem Built. The daybed  was also fabricated by Harlem Built, from a drawing by Rachel.
Subtle lighting gives the living room a cozy glow at night.
The walls of the study are painted a moody grey-blue.
The third bedroom is presently used as a family room.
The two bedroom suites resemble a modern take on a classic mountain cabin. Large windows and a private balcony allow guests to soak in the views while sinking in their private suite surrounded by artisan decor.
Floor-to-ceiling glazing floods the interiors with natural light, allowing the living areas to feel bright, airy, and spacious.
The living room, positioned centrally on the second floor, has access to both the private backyard and northern city views.
The living room encompasses white oakwood floors.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.