415 Living Room Light Hardwood Floors Ceiling Lighting Design Photos And Ideas

The main open-plan living space features a sofa from The Conran Shop, a vintage rug from SCP, a Grasshopper floor lamp by Gubi from Haus, two porcelain dogs from a charity shop, and a painting bought at the Royal Academy summer exhibition.
“When the clients first saw the fire in the rammed earth fireplace, they told me it instinctively connected with them, and they felt calm,” says architect Tono Mirai.
The walls are plastered using local earth. A skilled plasterer ensured that the curved walls and shell-shaped ceiling were seamlessly finished.
The large wooden deck, crafted from Japanese red pine and chestnut timber, extends the living space into the forest. A view from the deck shows the curved interior and the roof structure.
The first floor is constructed primarily from sawara cypress, a species of wood native to central Japan this is cultivated for its high-quality timber.
The Kamp Haus cabin interiors are minimalist with large windows that take advantage of the views.
The combined living, dining, and kitchen areas take up the main floor. "The goal for the design was to feel [as though you are] outside," says Dignard. Large, sliding glass doors capture the view and lead to an exterior deck.
To extend the living room view, the architects used corner glass, eliminating the need to use a jamb or corner post that would have interrupted the landscape.
The light-filled living room features a Kasota limestone fireplace. The slab stones were “fleuri” cut across the grain for a swirl effect, then sandblasted to age.
The home is articulated along the ridge to command the highest point on the property, providing the clients with sweeping views across the rolling farmland.
The living room opens into the kitchen and a hallway that leads to the master bedroom suite. Deep-set skylights above the living space let in morning light from the east.
The living room is dubbed the "Ladies Who Lunch" room. Benjamin Moore’s Chippendale Rosetone covers the walls, in rich contrast to the preserved wood ceiling, and a medley of vintage furnishings fills out the space. The rug is from IKEA and the chandelier is Schoolhouse Electric.
Recycled timber shelves stretch from the front hallway into the living areas, linking the old and the new.
The conversation pit provides an intimate view of the garden and backyard art studio.
A pink, modular Valley sofa sits with a green Kelly ottoman, both from Jardan, in the living room.
The home was gutted in the remodel, and the living spaces were oriented to take better advantage of the existing window plan.
The view from the kitchen is layered, first glimpsing a partial view of the dining room and the stained glass at the front exterior in the distance.
The colors in the furniture highlight the rich tones of the preserved stained glass.
With regards to the woodwork, "all of the new stuff that we added all have modern profiles," says Rausch, but their application recalls the home’s traditional roots. White paint marries new and old.
The floating oak staircase in the first-floor family room leads to the rooftop garden, which features a lounge area, grill, and small bar room with a restroom. Bespoke oak shelving behind the stair offers a display area for books and other objects.
The sunken living room created an opportunity for a bespoke joinery unit that can be used as a bench overlooking the courtyard as well as a storage space for books and objects. Topped with the same Iranian travertine marble that is used for the flooring in the entrance, it extends the hallway along the courtyard into the living room.
The family room on the second level.
The ceiling height was lowered over the seating area in the living room to create a cozy enclosure there, while double-height windows on the perimeter bring in yet more light.
A look back at the atrium on the left and the foyer on the right—sleek, built-in storage lines the entry on one side, opposite a two-sided fireplace.
The design team added new perimeter window openings to encourage light into the home wherever possible.
The wood-wrapped footbridge on the floor above defines the passage into the living room.
“We were keen to approach this project with a minimal aesthetic to amplify the brutalist architecture of the Barbican Estate,” explains the firm.
With a budget of £10,400 (approximately $13,000), Intervention Architecture transformed a tiny apartment into a minimalist studio. The firm worked with a cabinetmaker to design a custom unit and centerpiece for the space.
"We were influenced by Scandinavian style, but a white box with modern furniture would not have been right for us,” says resident Alya Shipilova.
L&M Design Lab leveraged the diagonal axis of an L-shaped, 366-square-foot flat in Shanghai to make it feel more spacious, carving out room for everyone’s hobbies—including a mini singing hall. The home, which is on the top floor of an older building, can be traversed in just 13 steps from north to south, say the designers, giving the project its name, A House Within Thirteen Steps. This view shows the diagonal axis of the apartment, looking back to the kitchen.
The slatted dividing wall creates a distinction between the living room and the entryway, which is essentially part of a larger open space that includes the dining area.
Bean Buro’s Urban Cocoon draws inspiration from Japanese teahouses. This reference point can be felt at the entryway, which features light timber and slatted screens.
The pitched portion of the roof creates a high ceiling and an airy aesthetic in the living area, where large windows, including two half moon windows, facilitate plenty of sunlight.
The open living area is light and bright, with flexibility integrated into the plan. A simple oak credenza provides minimal separation between the living area and the cooking/dining space. Large windows introduce plentiful natural light, while sliding glass doors draw in the garden. Oak paneling conceals additional kitchen storage space.
The fireplace has an energy-retaining flue and a glass door to prevent air and heat loss.
White-painted walls and cabinetry are offset by pale wood kitchen counters, stair treads, and flooring to maintain Scandinavian design aesthetics as well as a light and airy feeling for the interior.
Taking cues from their style-conscious clients, Jessica Helgerson Interior Design transformed an Amagansett home into a light-filled, Scandinavian-inspired getaway.
In the living area, a Mags Soft 3-Seater sofa by Hay sits on a rug by Milo.
In contrast to the dark exterior, the interior of the main residence is dressed in a stark shade of white, complementing the original hardwoods lining the floor throughout. Various sized windows line the walls, inviting an abundance of natural light inside.
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New HVAC systems also improved the air quality and humidity in the home.
The coffee table can fold out and double as a dining table. The bathroom also has a folding door to save space.
A hand-finished, rammed-earth feature wall references the Danxia Landform Geological Park in the homeowners’ native Zhangye, which boasts striated, rainbow-colored mountains. It also acts as a sound buffer with the neighbors.
Now, a folding wood wall separates the living room from the master bedroom area. The designers also created a mezzanine above the living room that hosts the daughter’s playroom and can be accessed by a rolling ladder. The door to the right leads to the new bathroom.
A porthole from the kitchen to the entrance—which makes reference to the seaside location—allows guests to be seen and welcomed as they arrive.
After: The industrial accents were kept at the ceiling in a nod to its past. The city required interior insulation to fulfill code, which meant McCuen was unable to expose the more rough, industrial texture on the walls.
Huge header beams and thickened walls allow for a generous opening between the living room and deck, with doors that recess into the wall cavity and a seamless meeting between the indoor floor and the exterior decking.
Large openings frame views of the tree line and the lake beyond. The heart of the living room is a stone tile fireplace, which references an element found in traditional cottages.
In the public spaces, large sliding glass doors provide a seamless connection for indoor/outdoor living.
The living room includes a vintage George Nelson sling sofa and concrete stools by CB2.
A folding partition can be used to separate part of the living room to create a fourth bedroom.
The view from the open plan kitchen into the living room when the coffee table is raised from the floor and set up for a tea ceremony.
The coffee table in the living room can be elevated when in use and sits flush with the floor when not in use. The owners often use the table for tea ceremonies.
The original living room was converted into an open-plan kitchen and dining area with a living room that can be reconfigured into a bedroom. The use of natural materials and the large windows that flood the space with natural light and frame the views make the small space feel bright and airy.
"When designing for a client or for a spec home, we design as if we were going to live there," Frank Lin says. "We look at what is comfortable for any kind of family to live in a space on a daily basis."

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.