135 Living Room Light Hardwood Floors Bookcase Design Photos And Ideas

Wood tones and earthy textures warm the reimagined living room. Much of the art were gifts that the couple bought for each other or pieces by mutual friends; the Mickey Mouse painting is by New Jersey–based artist Dylan Egon. "We like to bring some of the city into the country," says Lauren.
Eager to flee the city at a moment’s notice, a couple who run a creative studio in Bratislava decided it was time for a weekend home. On a forested plot overlooking a lake in nearby Vojkanad Dunajom, architect Peter Jurkovič of JRKVC created a calming cabin that frames views of the countryside.
On the second level, the design team arranged a living area that opens to a balcony and deck area. The built-in wall storage is crafted from oak.
A collaboration between YUN Architecture and interior designer Penelope August, a renovated, 19th-century townhouse with landmark status used to be an egg and poultry distributor. Now virtually unrecognizable, the parlor floor is the home's open-plan living area. A formerly defunct fireplace was reactivated and clad with a custom-made, limestone mantle.
On one side of the house, a white central staircase leads to a split-level landing the Robertsons call "the reading room." "We needed a place to hang out and for the kids to read," explains owner Vivi Nguyen-Robertson. Awaiting the birth of the couple's son, she relaxes in a built-in reading nook in the library.
White oak flooring keeps the open-concept space feeling light and bright.
"I always knew there had to be a sight line from the living room to the kitchen, all the way to the back of the house," says Alex. "That really opened up everything [like], ‘Oh, yeah, this is the way it's supposed to be.’"
Floor-to-ceiling shelves and storage bookend a cabinet that conceals the television.
The pair replaced the cluttered firewood storage with a floating hearth that can double as a seat and display for art.
Raj and Watts extended the fireplace column to the ceiling to highlight the room’s expansive scale, and had it coated in concrete plaster. It was important to retain the wood-burning fireplace—a rarity in the city—but “we wanted to re-clad it in a material that also spoke to the industrial past of the building,” says Raj.
Given the home’s tight and efficient footprint, the architects sought to use simple materials and strategic moves to delineate different spaces and uses. The lower ceiling height of the living room, for example, distinguishes it from the dining area, which has a taller ceiling.
To extend the living room view, the architects used corner glass, eliminating the need to use a jamb or corner post that would have interrupted the landscape.
The home is articulated along the ridge to command the highest point on the property, providing the clients with sweeping views across the rolling farmland.
Recycled timber shelves stretch from the front hallway into the living areas, linking the old and the new.
The home was gutted in the remodel, and the living spaces were oriented to take better advantage of the existing window plan.
The floating oak staircase in the first-floor family room leads to the rooftop garden, which features a lounge area, grill, and small bar room with a restroom. Bespoke oak shelving behind the stair offers a display area for books and other objects.
The sunken living room created an opportunity for a bespoke joinery unit that can be used as a bench overlooking the courtyard as well as a storage space for books and objects. Topped with the same Iranian travertine marble that is used for the flooring in the entrance, it extends the hallway along the courtyard into the living room.
Custom metal shelves display books. The flooring throughout is white oak, and its color syncs nicely with the tones in the brick—inside and out.
Located in the center of Mexico City, the Cuernavaca House by Tapia McMahon entirely fills its site, closely abutting the adjacent streetscape. Upon entry, an ash stairwell extends from the ground floor to the roof terrace, acting as a sculptural element that connects all three floors. The striking residence has been selected for the RIBA International List for 2018.
The courtyard is an extension of the living room, which can be separated by a folding glass door. The angled roofline and clerestory windows are visible above the second-story bedroom window.
The original living room was converted into an open-plan kitchen and dining area with a living room that can be reconfigured into a bedroom. The use of natural materials and the large windows that flood the space with natural light and frame the views make the small space feel bright and airy.
Generous cut-outs in the support wall connect the main living areas. The Togo couch and chairs are from Ligne Roset, and the sculpture is by Annie Morris.
The most important aspect of a successful neutral palette? "Texture, texture, texture!," Pickens says.
The classic post-and-beam style defines the home's interior. Exposed wood ceilings and lightly colored hardwood floors run throughout the open concept living area.
The curvy shape of this pink sofa gives it a fun, playful quality.
A central feature of the space are the stacked stone walls, which line all three sides of the room and feature original inscriptions from local workers.
On the opposite side of the entry hall is the living room. A double fronted log burner sits within the stone chimney at the center of the space.
What was once the industrial loft of a knitting mill is now a modern canvas for a collection of some 300 pieces of art. One can find pieces from Alexander Calder, Dan Flavin, John McCracken, Gary Hume, Francis Picabia, and more covering this renovated loft by Fiedler Marciano Architecture in conjunction with the art-loving husband-and-wife team that own the home. While the collection informed many of the elements, the space is a fusing, or conversation, rather, between the art, architecture, and design. The owners wanted a home, not a gallery.
Ladder to loft adds a playful element.
The ground floor features Douglas fir flooring. The living room at the front of the house is separated from the entrance hallway by a black steel-framed glazed partition.
The unique, handcrafted fireplace was installed where the original had long since been removed.
Thirteen windows in the apartment help maximize the fantastic views. The seating—including a sectional from West Elm and daybed from BoConcept—is now complemented by a fireplace specified by the firm.
In the lofted sleeping area, a custom-made steel railing is painted black.
Smartly tucked underneath the stairs is a full bath.
The firm raised the height and increased the width of the new opening between the kitchen and dining room.
The architect painted the shelving and the ceiling trim in the living room with a pale blue tone, adding an artful, geometric quality to the space.
The architect painted the trim of the living room's built-in shelving a shade of pale blue; the low ceiling is highlighted with the same hue, creating continuity.
The sliding doors on both sides allow the house to be entirely open to tropical breezes. Floor-to-ceiling glass also offers expansive views of the landscape and beyond.
Another view of the living room and the sliding glass doors that open to the porch. In total, the home features 100 feet of glass spanning the full with of the front and rear facades.
A bookcase was built along the 30-foot long anchor wall in the large living space. The shelves are inset several inches away from the glass walls on either side, intended to create a floating effect that mirrors the way the house itself floats above the ground.
A view looking from the kitchen to the open family room, which is outfitted with sofas by Perez Furniture. Above, interior windows in the upstairs bedrooms look out onto the double-height dining area and a view out of the giant window wall.
A skylight brings additional natural light into the open-plan living space. The gray, combed basalt fireplace figures prominently, as does built-in wood cabinetry.
CH25 chairs by Carl Hansen, a Flexform sofa, and a Gan rug outfit the cozy, uncluttered living room.
The main living area follows the same minimalist style, with enough room for a large table, sofa, and built-in work area. A large sliding door leads out to the rear deck.
Stairs to basement, concealed by a curated art collection.
Front entry and living area.
A door was replaced with an internal window that sheds light on the stairwell and a cat flap, so that the cats can move between rooms even if the kitchen door is closed.
The unit is 3.5 meters long and 2.4 meters tall, and is a chic focal point in the room.
Using heat-treated pine and bricks, Wood Arkitektur + Design built a casual family retreat on a family compound in Hellerud, a borough of Oslo, Norway. Situated on a natural slope, the house is divided into split levels. The exterior is swathed in heat-treated pine that has aged to a soft gray, alongside charcoal bricks. The rotating, open-faced fireplace here is the Ergofocus model from French company Focus.
Morten Bo Jensen, the chief designer at Vipp—whose headquarters are located in Islands Brygge—and his partner, graphic designer Kristina May Olsen, bought a loft space in the former Viking pencil factory in 2011. They bought the loft from its previous owner, one of five investors who purchased the circa-1910 factory building, roughly a decade ago, in a very raw state.
Double-height, steel-framed glass doors connect the entire home to its beachfront setting.
Living Room 02
Living Room 01
A sunroom provides additional living space.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.