568 Living Room Concrete Floors Design Photos And Ideas

Positioned for stellar outdoor views, the screened porch features concrete floors, a cedar ceiling, natural fir posts, and midcentury chairs.
In another contrast to the horizontality of the house, the architects added a translucent, multi-colored cocoon chair by Patricia Urquiola that hangs from the cantilevered slab.
The living room is furnished with low-lying timber furniture from studios like Ronan & Erwan Bourollec and Liceu de Artes e Ofícios.
Raw concrete walls and polished concrete floors are used in the interior to form a neutral backdrop for built-in wood furniture and colorful rugs and artworks.
Deep overhangs keep the harsh sun at bay.
Family Room
At the back of the living area is a volume shaped like a wooden house, which contains the kitchen, storage space, and a bedroom.
The built-in sofa was designed to be very functional. The base has storage capacity and the mattress is the size of a single bed for an extra guest. Plus, industrial grade foam and fabric ensure the cushions will hold up to wear and tear.
"I drew from the layout of Jens Risom’s cabin and laid the room out around the light that comes in through the main windows," says Kenny.
"With this cabin I wanted something that was robust, so you could enter after an outdoor activity, kick your boots off, start the fire and put some food on," says Kenny. "But at the same time have a feeling of space with the high ceilings, and some luxury and comforts of modern living like a nice shower and great water pressure."
Inside the studio, sliding fir screens hide storage, utilities, and a bathroom. The ceiling and wall panels are plywood, the floor is radiant heated concrete. An Eames lounge chair from Herman Miller mingles with an IKEA sofa.
The armchair is by Ricardo Fasenello.
The interior living room, on the reverse of the double-sided fireplace.
Contemporary materials like concrete and steel are a wonderful contrast to the ancient stone walls.
The living room is connected to a south-facing veranda.
Living area
"The asymmetrical volume, enveloping form, chiaroscuro effect of the curved corridor, shadows, margins, thresholds, voids, and raw materials allow the unique atmosphere of the place to emerge without concealing the structural logic of the house," says Antonio Di Bacco of Atelier Barda.
In the main living areas, two vertical veils divide the high, inclined ceilings, and also serve as partitions for the kitchen, dining room, and living room without completely separating the volumes. The living room is also connected to an outdoor gazebo.
Thirty-foot ceilings feature skylights for increased natural lighting. The walls are paneled in larch and provide concert-hall quality acoustics, and the floors are a polished black concrete.
A wall of windows frames the spectacular view of the lake and imparts a dynamic sense of place throughout the open-plan living area.
The living area is small, however, the double-height ceiling give is a more vast sense of space.
Extensive glazing keeps the interiors bright and enhancing the homes' strong connection to its surroundings. <span style=
The chic contemporary interiors feature concrete floors and plywood paneling, with black accents that echo the cabin’s exterior.
For the common areas, they choose more masculine, and contemporary design elements, and a darker color scheme to express the style preferences of the husband.
The timeless character of the black concrete is felt as one enters the semi-hidden entrance path to the house, and each of the volumes gradually reveals itself.
This “alley” veers then off at a right angle to become an indoor “courtyard” lined with green plants near the back section of the house.
The sitting room.
The sofa in the living room is also by IKEA.
A look at the dining table by Habitat and colorful IKEA dining chairs.
A solid brick enclosure has been used for the external north-facing wall.
The firm’s founder and principal architect Sumiou Mizumoto stripped away the house’s side extension.
The use of wood softens the industrial feel of the concrete.
The minimalist material palette is picked up on the interiors as well, where a black concrete fireplace plays off the polished aggregate concrete floors.
The living room opens to the courtyard.
 A study area on the mezzanine level overlooks the kitchen. Extensive glazing gives the ground floor living spaces a direct visual link with the courtyard and terrace.
The open-plan living room, dining area, and kitchen are encompassed with bright vibes.
On the living room ceiling a Sivra fixture by iGuzzini modulates its output based on the amount of available daylight. The sofa is Wall by Piero Lissoni for Living Divani.
Poured concrete floors and crisp, white plastered walls have been used to give the interiors a bright and fresh look.
Throughout the design, the site was quickly revealed as a powerful element of the project. By choosing carefully the location and size of each window, external views were highlighted, and the atmosphere created by natural light is pleasant throughout the whole day. As for the position of the large sliding door, it was “ pushed “ toward the main interior open space with the intention of subtly separating the internal functions while creating a outside protected space. All these intentions ultimately aim to capture the essence of this project: the surrounding nature and wildlife.
The floor-to-ceiling windows in the living room give the impression of being outside even while cozily enjoying a cup of tea inside. All the windows in the house are double-paned and filled with argon gas. Petra Sattler-Smith says that “even when it’s 10 below you can put your hand on them and they are still warm.” Hydronic radiant heating embedded within the concrete floors not only enables barefoot walking during the coldest months but also warms the furniture and everything else in the room.
The house has smart locks by August, Caséta wireless controls by Lutron, and a hub security system by Scout.
Raw plywood contrasts with dark plaster in the 460-square-foot main cabin, whose communal space encompasses an efficient living/dining area and kitchen.
Builder Ross Percival helped finesse the finely tuned detailing that separates the internal slope from the rock outside (opposite). The Pedro wire stool is by Craig Bond for Candywhistle.
The concrete bench in the living area just past the kitchen is built into the sloping wall. The Pedro wire stool is by Craig Bond for Candywhistle.
A sliding glass Western Window Systems door dissolves the boundary between indoor and outdoor.
The living spaces are orientated to the north, while the bedrooms have been placed in the south of the home.
Cradle-to-cradle certified carpet from the Shaw Group adds a warm layer in the living room.
The hotel is furnished with rattan furniture made in Sarchí, a Costa Rican town famous for crafts.
Climbing vines form a green wall and ceiling in the communal lounge area, providing some privacy without disturbing the natural setting.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.