158 Living Room Wood Burning Fireplace Coffee Tables Design Photos And Ideas

A peek at the open-plan living, dining, and kitchen areas.
The team also worked with Nouel to incorporate the expressive maximalism that the couple naturally gravitate toward.
Light timber floors, white-painted MDF shelving and cabinets, as well as black metal accents, give the home a clean and contemporary appearance.
Full-height windows blur the distinction between indoor and outdoors in the living area.
"I drew from the layout of Jens Risom’s cabin and laid the room out around the light that comes in through the main windows," says Kenny.
"With this cabin I wanted something that was robust, so you could enter after an outdoor activity, kick your boots off, start the fire and put some food on," says Kenny. "But at the same time have a feeling of space with the high ceilings, and some luxury and comforts of modern living like a nice shower and great water pressure."
The double-height space includes a built-in reading nook, a coffee cubby, a minibar, and cupboards stacked high with board games.
The great room is anchored by a 25-foot-high granite, wood-burning fireplace with a reclaimed timber mantle located beneath Alumicor skylights.
The armchair is by Ricardo Fasenello.
In the living room, the team raised the firebox, cladded the hearth in a tactile plaster finish, and installed a floating limestone bench that wraps the column. On the left (unseen) is integrated firewood storage, and a cozy reading nook sits on the right. "The bench was designed to be used as a social space/lounge, and is well-used," says Coffey. The wood beams and red brick were scraped and stripped many times to remove the silver paint and reclaim a natural state.
A wall of windows frames the spectacular view of the lake and imparts a dynamic sense of place throughout the open-plan living area.
The living area is small, however, the double-height ceiling give is a more vast sense of space.
The chic contemporary interiors feature concrete floors and plywood paneling, with black accents that echo the cabin’s exterior.
The interiors are bright and airy thanks to high wood-paneled ceilings and expansive glazing that open to the outdoors.
Sea breezes keep The Little Black Shack cool in summer, while a hand-built sandstone fireplace warms the property in winter.
The addition now forms a comfortable and fully functional new social heart for the home.
The architects created a new entrance for the home which leads directly into the new addition.
WRJ Design led the interior design.
At just over 300 square feet, the Fish Camp is the smaller of the two Camp styles, but the prototype illustrates its utility as guesthouse or office.
Bornstein’s living room features an intriguing collection of furniture. The sofa is made by Swedish manufacturer Ire. The 1970s wood burner was a secondhand store find, and the wood table, by Bruno Mattson, was found in a bin at a recycling station. He inherited the lounge chair from his parents.
The bank of translucent glass windows diffuses light evenly in the living room and contributes to the sensation that you have left the world behind. Eames chairs for Herman Miller are accompanied by Italian manufacturer U-vola’s unique speakers from Elite Audio Systems.
The designers explain, “These steel windows played an integral part in making the interior feel larger and more open by blurring the boundaries between the interior and exterior.” A grey Halcyon Lake area rug, an oak chair from MAP, and Hans Wenger Wishbone chairs make for a simple, neutral palette. The painting over the fireplace is by Kate Hendry.
A sheltered patio provides the perfect place to sip wine and take in the views.
A freestanding Nectre wood-burning stove provides extra warmth in winter, while operable louvers let in cooling breezes in summer.
Ray sits at the central hearth on the north end of the comfortable sunken living area. From this perspective, you can see how the interior spaces flow into one another, passing one half-level up into the breakfast nook and kitchen and out from there onto the overgrown hillside. The various built-in furnishings have all been there since the house's construction.
Extensive glazing surrounds the fireplace, keeping the interiors bright and airy.
Neutral, earthy tones and a mix of materials give the living room a warm and cozy vibe.
The entire parlor floor now serves as an open-plan kitchen, dining, and living area.
Now virtually unrecognizable, the parlor floor is the home's open-plan living area. A formerly defunct fireplace was reactivated and clad with a custom-made, limestone mantle.
The living room takes full advantage of the homes' stunning views.
The living space opens to the patio and pool area.
A long sofa in the center faces a coffee table topped with a slab of elm that was designed by Moss.
With bright, spacious, interiors, the home is a testament to the visionary creativity of one of America’s most renowned modernist architects.
The kitchen features eggshell blue cabinetry and an island topped with stainless steel.
The open-plan living room is anchored by a wood-burning two-sided fireplace.
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The front great room is intentionally public; the furniture-like wall (inspired by Mies’ Farnsworth house) creates privacy for all other rooms—even with no window coverings. No rooms have interior walls that connect with the outer perimeter of the house, echoing a design element of our 1958 E. Stewart Williams house in Palm Springs, CA.
The stunning canyon views can be enjoyed from all four levels of the house.
The property has a soaring sense of space thanks to the vaulted ceilings.
The home's character has maintained intact by preserving beautiful period details such as the wood-burning fireplace and the vaulted ceilings.
Perched on a hillside in San Rafael in Marin County just north of San Francisco, the Harrison House was designed by Beverley David Thorne in 1963. The midcentury home includes three bedrooms, two bathrooms, and stunning views of the San Rafael Valley. It also boasts modern updates, contemporary furnishings, and a vast collection of artwork.
The remodeled kitchen offers views of the San Rafael countryside and its surrounding valley. The right wing of the house is called the "Executive's Quarters" and includes three bedrooms and an office space, all of which have sliding glass doors that lead to a 800-square-foot deck. Just a 25 drive from the Golden Gate Bridge, the home is walking distance to McNears Beach Park and the Peacock Gap Golf Club.
Living Level
Slate gray Xander armchairs from World Market.
A WH Design sofa and an Arper Catifa 80 chair rest on a Nanimarquina rug made  of recycled bike tires.
A full height glass doors connects the living areas with the courtyard and forest outdoors.
Materials such as unpolished stone, used for the interior walls speak louder than statement furniture or décor.
The fireplace becomes a quiet, sculptural accent in the main living space.
Mid-century modern furniture, including a Fat Chance Sofa and Chair, an Eames surfboard coffee table, and a Gino Sarfatti Triennale Lamp by Arteluce, decorate the living room.

The modern living room is one of the busiest spots in the house. It is where family and friends alike gather to share stories, watch movies, read, and unwind. As you'll find in the projects below, there are endless ways to configure a fresh living space with modern options for chairs and sofas, sectionals, end and coffee tables, bookcases, benches, and more. Innovative fireplaces add a touch of warmth.