481 Kitchen Undermount Sinks Wall Oven Design Photos And Ideas

Renovated on a budget of approximately $100 per square foot, this 1,000-square-foot Brooklyn loft in a 1947 chocolate factory is an honest celebration of affordable materials. New Affiliates transformed the formerly dark and cluttered space into a warm, light-filled home that smartly fits two sleeping areas, a bathroom, a study, a new kitchen, and a living/dining area without losing the loft’s airy and open feel. The key to the project’s success was leaving materials and elements exposed—from the pine plywood used for the walls, panels, and cabinets to the existing pair of three-and-a-half-foot-wide Art Moderne columns that were painted white and integrated into the design, rather than hidden.
The flooring in the main room and bedroom is Worthwood Solid End Grain from Oregon Lumber.
The kitchen cabinets are made of CVG Douglas fir plywood, which Grey stained, finished, and topped with handmade Japanese tile from California-based Wa-Kei & Company. The wall lights are original refurbished Eklipta lights by Arne Jacobson for Louis Poulsen. The ceramic bowl is by Linda Hsaio of Knotwork L.A.
The kitchen island features an elegant concrete top in a light tone that complements the white oak joinery and allows the Carrera marble backsplash to steal the show.
The kitchen has a large central island, with the range and workspaces on the right and a huge built-in on the left in front of the stair. A bright, white laminate wall holds the oven and refrigerator. Architect Nicholas Fiore says this element “pumps the brakes a bit” on the white oak shiplap walls and white oak ceiling.
Quartz floating shelves are a light and airy departure from the typical wood floating shelf.
The heavy hitters in the kitchen budget were the cabinetry, quartz counters, and a suite of appliances, including a refrigerator, wall oven/microwave unit, induction range, and dishwasher for $10,000.
The kitchen island is nine-and-a-half feet long, made possible by knocking down non-load-bearing walls and enlarging the room’s footprint. The island is “much larger than what most people would do in that space, because it's not that large of a space, but knocking down those walls and going with a large island makes the kitchen feel a lot more grand,” says Devlin.
The kitchen sits at the center of the home beneath the void. Beneath the stair, sliding pocket doors conceal a pantry and kitchen appliances (such as the toaster and kettle).
A wine refrigerator and wet bar with the same finishes as the kitchen for cohesion brings more function for entertaining. “We use it more than we've ever used it before,” says Shawn. “It is no longer a dumping ground.”
Construction pausing during the pandemic turned out to be a boon: Living in the half-finished space, the couple realized they needed to open up the pass-through to the rest of the house for even more circulation.
A niche was built out for the wall ovens and a coffee counter.
Shawn, who runs Von Walter + Funk, a lifestyle boutique and event creative company, made the pendant lights over the island.
Mouser Cabinetry’s textured laminate flat-front doors were used throughout. The slim, black hardware is Europa by Top Knobs.
The couple chose Thermador appliances from Don’s Appliances. The black Nero Marquina marble counters are in a high honed finish, which kept them from becoming too gray in the finish process.
The Backed Utility Stool from Schoolhouse Electric in Sergeant Green now lines the island, offering a designated spot for guests to hang out while Jamie cooks.
The owner, Lauren Ellingson, did all of the interior design on the studio unit and main home.
A dramatic white oak panel wall reaches up to the new vaulted ceilings. There’s a concealed pantry to the right of the refrigerator.
A thick, poured concrete slab forms the surface of the large island and waterfalls to the floor on one side.
The backsplash and counters are Caesarstone, and a floating white oak shelf was positioned flush with the hood vent for a cleaner look.
The pair borrowed a little space on the front porch and expanded the kitchen into the breakfast nook, so the sink now looks out on the front yard and old olive tree.
The custom cabinetry with pronounced wood grain is one of the materials chosen for its haptic qualities.
Birch plywood with a white wash forms the cabinetry in the kitchen and the island is topped with marble. Perimeter counters are Corian. The faucet is Astra Walker and the cabinet handles are Made Measure.
The kitchen is anchored by a deep window seat with views of the harbor. “My favorite place in the house is the built-in deep daybed off the kitchen, from where I like to look out onto the water with a book in hand,” says Fox. “Having the view of the water and getting cozy in that spot is perfect.”
The sleeping quarters and a family room are located down the hallway.
Slim-lined shelves highlight the wood backdrop. Cabinet hardware was custom powder-coated to match the cabinet color.
The angles of the kitchen island mimic the fireplace detail. There’s a door to a walk-in pantry concealed in the cabinetry.
Ebonized oak cabinetry anchors the kitchen. Smoked mirror forms the backsplash, "to reflect the view even when you're turned away from it," says Megowan.
A mirrored backsplash reflects the garden. Spotted Gum cabinetry meets floors of the same material for uninterrupted flow. The counters are stainless steel.
Integrated appliances avoid clutter in the petite galley layout.
The kitchen island features a top made from concrete and rimu, a native New Zealand timber. As rimu is no longer harvested, the piece was pulled from a swamp and is potentially around 1,000 years old. The split between the concrete and timber reflects the split between the flooring materials. “The faceted form of the island ties into our concept and links to the fractured forms on the exterior of the house,” says Craig.
The architects reused much of the existing walnut cabinetry, giving it an ebonized finish for contrast.
The kitchen’s Caesarstone Pure White countertop extends to the winding tread at the base of the stairs leading up to the mezzanine. Black granite covers the island.
The new kitchen has facilitated lessons in cooking for the couple. "We wanted a big, comfortable kitchen to learn how to cook," says Martin. "We invented a method where we invite friends to cook with us, and we learn by doing."
The sleek kitchen is separated from the living area and dining room. A glass sliding door on the south side connects the kitchen to an outdoor dining area and kitchen with wood-burning brick ovens.
White quartz for the island and countertops offsets dramatic blue cabinetry in the kitchen of this modern home in Sun Valley, Idaho, designed by Sarah Latham.
For this Seattle, Washington, home designer Charlie Hellstern selected concrete countertops. "Inherently durable, made sustainably, and it fit with the modern aesthetic of the home," she says.
A dramatic black island is expertly balanced by a wall of white cabinetry and a refrigerator that blends perfectly. The kitchen’s black countertops were cut from Nero Assoluto granite. The sink and faucet are from Quebec-based company Rubi. Appliances are from Wolf.
The open kitchen and the adjacent bench are a mix of materials that include HPL, sandblasted pine plywood, brass, marble, and lacquer.
The shelving is composed of simple, Mondrian-like color blocking.
In the kitchen, a bank of copper-fronted cabinetry joins the pink marble backsplash. The island is set atop a curving pink base that gives it some lightness.
An original timber post stands beside the new sleek cabinetry and stainless-steel countertops.
The firm also designed the new kitchen space, opting for a contrasting darker palette.
Whitney created a bright and airy feeling for the kitchen by switching out the stainless-steel appliances for bright white ones. Sunlight pours in from the skylight and reflects off of the glossy finish of the cream-colored counters that replaced the original black speckled countertops. "I was craving bright countertops, but I also wanted something with a slight, sandy texture as an homage to the nearby beach," says Whitney. "I also liked the idea of a mildly reflective surface to help enhance the light that spills in from the skylight over the dining counter."
Since the family has three young children, easy-to-clean surfaces were a must.
In an apartment of only about 350 square feet, Madrid–based architectural firm elii has designed a functional layout with a bright palette that emphasizes light and views to the streetscape outside. The light green cabinetry keeps the apartment feeling bright, while the wood gives texture and a natural feeling to the space.
Since the home is something of a pied-à-terre for the clients, its design is geared more toward short-term stays than full-time living. That means spaces like the kitchen are set up for entertaining. Notice the curve on the cabinetry, counter, and backsplash, which is Calacatta Macchia Vecchia marble. All of the appliances are from Fisher & Paykel, and the wall sconce is a Gabriel Scott single Welles pendant in smoked glass and brushed brass.
What was once a small dining area has been opened up into a bright kitchen, living, and dining space.
Black kitchen cabinetry and appliances reinforce the interior's contrasting color palette. The double-height space also emphasizes the structure's A-frame design with soaring ceilings.
In the kitchen, oak millwork pairs with simple matte black cabinetry and stone accents. Sphere pendant lights from Hub Furniture hang above the island seating, adding a simple, playful touch to the open space. Connected to the garden and main living area, the kitchen is now the ideal location for gathering with friends and family.
"The spaces and materials are very kid-friendly," says Wittman. "The natural finishes are durable and easy to clean. Organic materials with their own unique textures patina over time, which will allow the spaces to be lived in and loved while weathering gracefully for a long future."
There are now two options for seating—at the end of the island or in the nook beyond.

The modern kitchen is the heart of the home. Cooking and conversing go hand-in-hand as meals are created, memories made. Whether teaching an old family recipe, reading the newspaper in a breakfast nook, or chatting over the daily morning coffee, the ritual of the everyday begins here. Spark your imagination by browsing our collection of modern kitchens. From popular counter materials like marble, granite, quartz, and wood; to stunning examples of white cabinets; to flooring options like hardwood and concrete, these projects showcase it all. You'll also find ideas for backsplashes, lighting, appliances, and sinks.