112 Kitchen Drop In Sinks Range Hood Wood Cabinets Design Photos And Ideas

Artist Cori Creed stands in the kitchen of the vacation home in rural British Columbia that she and her husband, Craig Cameron, built with their friend and architect, Kevin Vallely. Cori made the ceramic dinnerware and pendants, while Craig built the kitchen island and installed the plywood ceiling with the help of his stepfather.
“The home wasn’t an inexpensive house to build,” says architect Peter Tolkin. “At the same time, it doesn’t have very fancy interior finishing. We wanted to design a modern house with a certain kind of spirit, and we didn’t think that the interior materials needed to be overly fancy. The two places where we really splurged—I think to great effect—were on the tiles in the bathrooms and kitchen, and the copper cladding, which protects the house but also has a very strong visual component to it.”
The communal kitchen in the main house provides a space for guests to gather and cook together. This space is sleek and modern with hardware-less marine-grade plywood cabinets and a large, concrete island with seating.
A green laminate countertop by Abet Laminati is surrounded by Norman Foster’s Emeco 20-06 counter stools at the island in the kitchen, which has an integrated Frigidaire induction range, Faber Cylindra Isola range hood, Blomberg dishwasher, Fisher & Paykel fridge, and flat-grain fir plywood cabinets by Portland craftsman Doug Chamblin.
Recycled veneer coats the cabinetry, custom plant holders bring the outside in, and stainless steel provides a modern touch without seeming stark.
The homeowners love the flow of the kitchen, dining room, living room, and butler’s pantry—so much so that they've already had more parties since moving in than they did in 26 years at their prior residence.
The double-duty kitchen island is a simple offshoot that contrasts with the industrial countertops.
Cork flooring knits the main living spaces together.
Simple leather pulls adorn the cabinet faces, while open shelves put everyday items within easy reach.
A warm palette of birch plywood with olive green linoleum outfits the kitchen.
A graphic black lighting feature hangs above the kitchen bench, which conceals storage space behind oak doors.
“Removing the wall afforded a larger kitchen footprint, and made the space more inviting,” Hope-Kennedy says.
Here, an industrial material palette—with a concrete brick backsplash and counter foundation, and zinc-plated pan-decking ceilings—complement the development’s edgy facade.
Vibrant blue cabinets brighten up this kitchen and serve as a bold contrast to the exposed brick. The stainless-steel countertop wraps slightly up the wall, and creates a trough for storing items.
Brick, paired with concrete and wood, creates an organic warmth throughout this Spanish home.
The firm enlisted their Parisian carpenter to make the cabinets in the "Frey style and color"—stained maple topped with cream-colored quartz. Appliances are all Bertazzoni except for the refrigerator and freezer, which is a Frigidaire Professional. The brick wall would not have been original, but the firm kept it and hand-painted the surface in the style of Le Corbusier’s Parisian apartment.
A young Vancouver family asked Falken Reynolds Interiors to convert their waterfront vacation home on British Columbia’s Sunshine Coast into their primary residence. To facilitate livability for the foursome, an enlarged kitchen, complete with a large white island with wood hardware, was a major part of the renovation.
Developed by Lang Architecture, Hudson Woods is an eco-friendly, locally-sourced, 26-family community spread across 131 acres in the midst of the Hudson River Valley. In the kitchen of one of the cabins, dark-green subway tiles contrast with wood cabinetry and a marble-topped central island that was crafted from blackened steel and walnut.
The kitchen is inspired by the commercial kitchens that the client worked at in his youth.
A look at the gourmet kitchen, which features a large center island and separate peninsula. Dark cabinetry contrasts with the room's crisp marble accents.
Black marble countertops and backsplash create a high-contrast look in the kitchen.
A pop of red provides the perfect accent for the kitchen, which features marble from New Age Granite and Tiles and appliances by GE, Thermador, and Miele.
In the kitchen, crisp white cabinets complement a walnut table from Space Furniture. Custom lighting from JD Lighting Tech emphasizes the verticality of the home. The dining chairs are from Industry West.
Equipped with an antique Garland stove and a custom teak wood island, the chef’s kitchen also provides direct access to the backyard. Also located on the garden level is an expansive sun room, media room, and custom-tiled powder room.
“We really wanted the materials in the house to feel very of-the-place,” says Lamaster. The architects hunted down domestic stone—like the Vermont marble used for countertops.
Inspired by a love of camping, the Bush House, by Archterra, nods to California’s Case Study Houses, built from the 1940s to the 1960s. Set on a family cattle farm in a Western Australia coastal town on the Margaret River, Bush House marries a single-plane roof with a prefabricated steel frame support structure. A rammed-earth wall carries through the house into the outdoors, melding with oiled plywood, anodized aluminum, and salvaged furniture.
The kitchen, built with imported Tasmanian oak and plywood, features one of the most beloved details from Pam’s Cross-Stitch House—a kitchen island with a mirrored base—but the floating bench here is shaped differently to represent Arthur. "[The mirror] lightens the space in many ways, so you don’t feel like the island is taking over," says Dunin. Graphic backsplash tiles fom Academy Tile run into laminate countertops with a plywood edge. The refrigerator is Fisher & Paykel, and the combo oven and cooktop is V-ZUG.
The client fell in love with this marble-and-quartz countertop, which is called Super White. The kitchen features a Gaggenau refrigerator, Julien sink, BlueStar range, and Ochre kitchen stools as well.
The large space also features Gaggenau appliances, including a built-in refrigerator, double ovens, and five-burner cooktop.
For the kitchen, Fogarty went with a very unique material and used zinc for the island. "It's an old-fashioned material used in many old kitchens that is slightly soft," he says. "You can cut on it, and it rubs away and becomes part of the patina."
The built-in hardware is one of Simon's favorite elements of the kitchen. "We liked the idea of not having a lot of jewelry in this room," she says. The pendant lights are from Shades of Light, the bar stools from Interlude Home, the wall sconces from Cedar and Moss, and the accessories are from Everything But the House, an online auction house.
The Raskinds designed an open-concept kitchen with midcentury charm using Dunn Edwards paint in Deepest Sea and West Elm light fixtures. They replaced the original cabinetry with Semihandmade cabinetry, and built an island with a white-and-black marble slab from Stoneville. "We found this great panda-colored slab and knew we wanted to do a waterfall island to elevate the look of the IKEA doors," she says.
A hammered copper farmhouse sink from Sinkology and copper hardware from Decorator Hardware contrast warmth against the blue and green tones of the cabinetry. The existing wood flooring was kept, just sanded and stained to match other areas of the house.
"Where the house sits, it’s sandwiched between these two structures," says Garry. This made accessing good natural light and views a challenge. A breakthrough move in the design consisted of installing windows on the north wall with glass-backed cabinets over them, thereby admitting natural light into the house, but not giving less-than-ideal views of surrounding buildings too much visual weight.
The steel hood vent design was custom-made and inspired by a steel circular fireplace in the Frey I home.
The living space off the kitchen opens up entirely to the outdoors.
Inserting a mix of texture, raw materials and functional elements, SHED Architecture & Design was able to artfully marry the new additions with the original industrial construction in Capitol Hill Loft by using a palette of concrete brick, stainless steel plate, blackened steel, and mirror.
While the back part of the house originally housed the bathroom and laundry rooms, all but making the adjacent garden inaccessible, the new design places the living and dining spaces in this area to maximize natural light. Commonly available materials are used throughout the home, such as plywood and the industrial tresses that criss-cross the open-plan living area.
The home’s open floor plan allows for easy flow between the living room and kitchen. Tall ceilings make the property feel much larger than its actual size.
The spacious kitchen comes with all new appliances, including two built-in wall ovens.
Fitted with Miele Pro appliances, the fully equipped kitchen features plenty of counter space, along with a center island that’s great for prepping snacks and meals.
Right off the main living area is a spacious kitchen.
The new kitchen is modern and utilitarian, modest yet open and spacious. The U-shaped counters face the views on one side, and bookended by a skylit wall of hand-cut blue ceramic tile. The long skylight over the back counter helps balance the light from the windows opposite, and gives a warm wash of light over the work space all day long.
Reconfiguring the house allowed us to add some logic and coherence to the rooms and flow. There is now a central hall that connects the entry area to the kitchen, living room, and bedrooms. In this view, the full-height custom walnut casework separates the kitchen from the entry area.
A waterfront conversation pit brings a touch of midcentury glamour to this modern oasis in Miami Beach.
Sleek and stylish, the stainless steel chef's kitchen boasts numerous appliances from Viking.
The spirit has found a place to emerge again, he shakes and touches those that are outside and protects and shelters those that have welcomed him.
A feature moss wall, visible from the entry, covers one of the bathroom walls to bring the outdoors into the apartment. Chen imported the no-maintenance preserved moss system from Korea.
The bathroom sliding door is made of glass that frosts over for privacy with the push of a button. The frosted glass allows natural light to pass from the bathroom into the kitchen.
At sunrise, light bounces off the rammed earth wall, imbuing the kitchen with a warm, orange glow at breakfast.
Once hidden away in closed quarters, the kitchen has been moved to a more open and central location in the home, blending historic elements with modern additions.
The backsplash and countertops are made from granite. Terrazzo marble lines the kitchen floor.
A work counter and breakfast bar.
The addition's modern, open kitchen.
Different surface materials create textural richness in the kitchen.
The custom gourmet kitchen has a center island, marble floors and countertops, white lacquer and oak cabinetry, stainless steel Miele appliances, and a view.
The simple, efficient kitchen features a stainless-steel counter. From the kitchen, another staircase descends to a basement with a utility room, larder, and TV area.
Walnut veneer walls warm up and unify the open-plan spaces.
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The modern kitchen is the heart of the home. Cooking and conversing go hand-in-hand as meals are created, memories made. Whether teaching an old family recipe, reading the newspaper in a breakfast nook, or chatting over the daily morning coffee, the ritual of the everyday begins here. Spark your imagination by browsing our collection of modern kitchens. From popular counter materials like marble, granite, quartz, and wood; to stunning examples of white cabinets; to flooring options like hardwood and concrete, these projects showcase it all. You'll also find ideas for backsplashes, lighting, appliances, and sinks.