517 Kitchen Recessed Lighting Refrigerator Design Photos And Ideas

"The wife’s vision was to create a very calming interior using a minimalist material palette," explains Mac. "The custom kitchen was designed to be elemental—we wanted [it] to feel more integrated [with the rest of the space]. The oak cabinets, concrete countertops, and appliance placements all reinforced this aesthetic."
Garcia specified display space, complete with a shelf, behind the Murphy bed, so that it “creates a moment” when the bed is folded down, the architect says.
Garcia says people often comment that the ADU just needs a refrigerator and dishwasher, not realizing that both are seamlessly concealed in the cabinetry. “It’s actually a fully-functioning kitchen,” says Garcia, including a 15-inch WOLF cooktop, a TK dishwasher drawer, and TK refrigerator drawer. The counter is Caesarstone.
The kitchen features organic materials, such as wood and leather, with a matte-white quartz counter. "We wanted the space to feel uniquely warm and lived-in while achieving some modern aesthetic," says Tarah.
The kitchen layout was reconfigured so that the focus is on the view—the wall of windows, which look out on the ocean, is now underscored by one long, uncluttered counter. There, the faucet is Delta and the dishwasher is Bosch. The range stayed in nearly the same spot, and the opposite wall has been thickened with storage and the refrigerator column. Both the refrigerator and range are by Bertazzoni.
Vermont Danby Marble along the countertops features blue veining that nods to the home's waterfront location. Sliding glass doors open the dining area to the surrounding outdoor space.
The kitchen has a large central island, with the range and workspaces on the right and a huge built-in on the left in front of the stair. A bright, white laminate wall holds the oven and refrigerator. Architect Nicholas Fiore says this element “pumps the brakes a bit” on the white oak shiplap walls and white oak ceiling.
Flat-front maple cabinetry and a soapstone counter keep the kitchen backdrop simple.
Quartz floating shelves are a light and airy departure from the typical wood floating shelf.
The kitchen island is nine-and-a-half feet long, made possible by knocking down non-load-bearing walls and enlarging the room’s footprint. The island is “much larger than what most people would do in that space, because it's not that large of a space, but knocking down those walls and going with a large island makes the kitchen feel a lot more grand,” says Devlin.
The high ceilings and white and cream tones of the main living area create an expansive feeling inside the home.
A wine refrigerator and wet bar with the same finishes as the kitchen for cohesion brings more function for entertaining. “We use it more than we've ever used it before,” says Shawn. “It is no longer a dumping ground.”
Construction pausing during the pandemic turned out to be a boon: Living in the half-finished space, the couple realized they needed to open up the pass-through to the rest of the house for even more circulation.
A niche was built out for the wall ovens and a coffee counter.
Shawn, who runs Von Walter + Funk, a lifestyle boutique and event creative company, made the pendant lights over the island.
Mouser Cabinetry’s textured laminate flat-front doors were used throughout. The slim, black hardware is Europa by Top Knobs.
The couple chose Thermador appliances from Don’s Appliances. The black Nero Marquina marble counters are in a high honed finish, which kept them from becoming too gray in the finish process.
The Backed Utility Stool from Schoolhouse Electric in Sergeant Green now lines the island, offering a designated spot for guests to hang out while Jamie cooks.
Top 9 Kitchens of 2020: The nominees for this year’s Dwell Design Awards are the epitome of style and function.
"We made a number of low-design-impact improvements to the existing part of the house as the contractors found some alarming errors in previous remodels," reveals Davis. "The house now feels ready for the next century."
The cabinetry in the kitchen is rift-sawn, dark-stained white oak that complements the ceilings and contrasts with the white walls. The dark-pigmented concrete floors were intentionally left untreated in order to convey a sense of time. “As the home ages, the floor ‘records’ the construction process, foot traffic, wine spilled at birthday parties, drips of olive oil from anniversary dinners, watermarks from relaxing showers, and so on,” says architect Hunter Gundersen. “Every action will be subtly set in stone before it’s quickly cleaned up or swept away. Over the years, a patina of life will build up, adding depth and beauty to the interior.”
Pots, pans, cutlery, and shelves are hung on a pegboard wall in the kitchen, offering a clever way to utilize space that would be otherwise wasted.
Road-Haus features thoughtfully crafted details throughout, such as the leather pulls on the kitchen cabinetry.
The cozy living space features a fireplace with a mantel that doubles as a shelf or coffee table. There is the option of either an electric fireplace or a more expensive gas fireplace.
"By utilizing more windows, our homes bring the outdoors in, providing lots of natural light," says Mackay.
The kitchen features white oak cabinetry and an island topped with Caesarstone in Rugged Concrete. The Torii stools are from Bensen and the Compendium pendant is from Luceplan,  while the oven is by Wolf and the faucet is by California Faucets. The long white wall was meant for hanging art but so far remains bare. “It feels like a gallery that was ransacked,” jokes Jim, “but we’ve grown attached to the clean expanse.”
The light in the kitchen is Supernova by Delta. “We explored the historical idea of how traditional native dwellings had a fire at the centre of the house around which everything gathers,” says architect Trevor Wallace. “The idea of an ‘oculus’ came from this and we thought it would be fun to play off that and provide this oculus-like light that is effectively the centre point of gathering within the home.”
“The home wasn’t an inexpensive house to build,” says architect Peter Tolkin. “At the same time, it doesn’t have very fancy interior finishing. We wanted to design a modern house with a certain kind of spirit, and we didn’t think that the interior materials needed to be overly fancy. The two places where we really splurged—I think to great effect—were on the tiles in the bathrooms and kitchen, and the copper cladding, which protects the house but also has a very strong visual component to it.”
The in-law suite shares two walls with the main house to save construction and operation costs, but is equipped with a separate entrance, a private patio, and a full kitchen, living area, ensuite bedroom, and laundry.
“The most important thing was to bring a sense of authenticity to the project, like it really couldn’t exist anywhere else or for anyone else,” says architect Jodi Batay-Csorba.
The backsplash in the kitchen is a frameless sliding window that offers natural cross ventilation. It currently frames the ti-tree fencing, but as the landscaping grows greenery will be visible.
The material palette is subtle, with a few feature elements. In the kitchen, for example, white cabinetry matches the wall finish for a seamless appearance, while the marble countertop is a nod to the owners’ Italian heritage and provides a natural focal point for entertaining.
The angles of the kitchen island mimic the fireplace detail. There’s a door to a walk-in pantry concealed in the cabinetry.
Ebonized oak cabinetry anchors the kitchen. Smoked mirror forms the backsplash, "to reflect the view even when you're turned away from it," says Megowan.
Mighty Buildings have positioned themselves as a “production-as-a-service platform” to give homebuilders the opportunity to outsource the most labor-intensive aspects of construction.
All Mighty Buildings units come with basic appliances installed. This unit features modern Kohler fixtures, high-efficiency spotlights, and energy-efficient kitchen appliances.
The Mighty Duo B took a total of five weeks to complete from construction to installation. In addition to production time, two weeks were spent on site work, and an addition week on on-site finish work. This timeline does not include the time needed for permitting and entitlement services.
Marble covers the backsplash, and new upper cabinets inset with fluted glass were added.
The stainless-steel elements, including the counter and cabinets, were also kept in place for their industrial character. The island was reworked and topped with marble.
The architects reused much of the existing walnut cabinetry, giving it an ebonized finish for contrast.
The vintage glass pendant lights were found on Etsy—one of the designer’s favorite resources. “I am not a flea market person. I just don’t have the stamina,” says Zachary. “But when it comes to Etsy, I’m just, like, ‘Okay, I can handle this.’”
Zachary brought in new counter stools from Rejuvenation.
The existing cabinets were painted Card Room Green by Farrow & Ball.
Since there was plenty of storage, Zachary took down the upper cabinets and replaced them with a Logan wall rack from Lostine.
Since Forbes preferred a matte finish, the Absolute Black Granite slab was installed upside down for the kitchen counters.
A pitched, tongue-and-groove ceiling adds a rustic feel.
The kitchen was constructed with the KXN modular steel system by IMO.
The dining table and chairs in the kitchen were handcrafted by the homeowner from timber harvested on-site.

The modern kitchen is the heart of the home. Cooking and conversing go hand-in-hand as meals are created, memories made. Whether teaching an old family recipe, reading the newspaper in a breakfast nook, or chatting over the daily morning coffee, the ritual of the everyday begins here. Spark your imagination by browsing our collection of modern kitchens. From popular counter materials like marble, granite, quartz, and wood; to stunning examples of white cabinets; to flooring options like hardwood and concrete, these projects showcase it all. You'll also find ideas for backsplashes, lighting, appliances, and sinks.