101 Kitchen Pendant Lighting Ceiling Lighting Drop In Sinks Design Photos And Ideas

Two friends spent three years reviving this 16th-century Basque church near Bilbao, Spain. Abandoned since the late 1970s, the church was in need of serious repair. The roof had caved in and vegetation had thoroughly invaded the structure. Built in the mid-16th century, with some add-ons in the form of an 18th-century bell tower and sacristy, the church had obvious archaeological and historical value.
Kitchen
A local blacksmith fabricated metal elements for the doors, shelves, and light fittings throughout the house.
The dining table and chairs in the kitchen were handcrafted by the homeowner from timber harvested on-site.
The communal kitchen in the main house provides a space for guests to gather and cook together. This space is sleek and modern with hardware-less marine-grade plywood cabinets and a large, concrete island with seating.
The front and back doors are only 12 feet apart from one another, separated by the living space at the heart of the home. The open floor plan allows the living space, den, dining room, and kitchen to flow into each other, while the way the volumes are positioned makes each space feel distinct—this works well for entertaining both large and small groups.
A full-length skylight above the floating steel shelf in the kitchen allows light to stream across the Venetian plaster wall and bounce off the high-gloss white shelf. “It creates an ever-changing and ethereal experience,” says designer Jamie Chioco. The ceramic dishes and plates displayed on the shelf are from Kinn Home.
The island bar in the kitchen features white Arcilla Field tiles by Ann Sacks that match the turquoise tiles used in the guest bathroom. The lights above the bench are classic VL45 Radiohus pendants, which were originally designed in the 1940s by Danish architect Vilhelm Lauritzen for Louis Poulsen for the construction of the Radiohuset building in Copenhagen.
The kitchen was relocated to its designated place and reinstalled as per White’s building specs. A stainless-steel counter and sink, powder-coated cabinets, and sliding panels in pastels replicate the original 1955 version while contemporary updates include Vola faucets, Heath Ceramics tiles, sliding freezer drawers, an induction range, and a refrigerator by Jennair.
A small kitchen tucked in the corner received cosmetic updates during the renovation.
In the kitchen, designer Polina Kopteva used Tikkurila N435 blue paint.
Dumas kept a relatively simple palette when it came to the interior. Floor-to-ceiling cabinetry in the kitchen acts as an effective noise barrier.
The new kitchen/dining room is entirely open and provides views of the garden.
The kitchen is at the heart of the home, and the layout is arranged so that the views can be appreciated when preparing a meal. Warm timber shelves and furniture contrast with the dark kitchen joinery to create a balanced interior palette.
The window units over the counter were also salvaged finds.
All of the cabinets and walls of the Jayco camper were professionally sprayed with Benjamin Moore Simply White to create a crisp, modern look. Steve and Trina then sanded and wiped down the doors, primed them, and used Alkyd satin paint for the final coating.
The kitchen countertops are black quartz, offering a strong visual contrast to the plywood. “Leïla and Xavier enjoy having friends over to sit at the kitchen island, which is the center of the space,” says architect Catherine Milanese.
Steps away from the living area is a bright and airy chef's kitchen. Boasting custom Poggepohl white-lacquer cabinetry and white-honed Carrera marble countertops, the kitchen also comes with a Gaggenau dishwasher, stainless-steel convection and steam ovens, as well as a SubZero wine cooler and refrigerator.
Brick, paired with concrete and wood, creates an organic warmth throughout this Spanish home.
A family's dream of living in a converted warehouse becomes a reality when Zen Architects successfully transforms a leaky warehouse from the 1960s into a bright and airy family home—without compromising on comfort or energy efficiency. Bright yellow subway tiles complement dark teal cabinets and colorful dishware.
Whereas others might look at a board-formed cement wall in a basement and see, well, a concrete wall, Jess and Jonathan Taylor, the design duo behind the L.A.-based firm Taylor + Taylor, were inspired. The couple had purchased a virtually untouched 1952 house in east L.A. and that concrete wall became the backdrop for a new guest kitchen in the basement. "It was really the starting point of the whole design," says Jess Taylor. "As designers, our goal is to always try to incorporate the existing surroundings whenever possible, utilize them in practical ways, and be inspired by them."
This backsplash may only cover a small surface area, but its asymmetric tiles are the kitchen’s pièce de résistance.
The majority of the kitchen is set into the rear back wall, which is painted black to ground the house in the sloped site.
The kitchen and dining space opens out onto the timber terrace, which has expansive water views.
Black appliances and fixtures blend seamlessly into the cabinetry. The lack of a large fridge helps give the kitchen its streamlined and minimal appearance. The couple carefully integrated appliances to make the small space fully functional for entertaining. Two CoolDrawers are tucked under the counter to chill wine and store enough food for the weekend. Two ovens allow home cooks to bake bread and roast meat simultaneously. “It just works really well for us,” says Daniel. “Our counter space is at a premium, and we just didn’t need a giant refrigerator. This way, we can have the L-shaped counter. That was a very strategic decision—it doesn’t need to be more than what it is.”
The blush-colored Rojo Alicante marble table in the center of the kitchen doubles as a dining table and kitchen island. A Craiglist score for $200, the table is another kitchen hack conceived by the architects. “It was really a diamond in the rough. Originally, it was a rectangle shape, in a weird ’90s, Italian kind of style, covered in a thick, resin-like finish that made it look almost orange,” says Daniel. The table was honed down to soften its color, and its top was reshaped with rounded corners.
The kitchen features hacked IKEA cabinets—Brit and Daniel built custom fronts and side panels out of Valchromat, a recycled engineered wood. The cabinets are topped with black steel, which extends up the wall as backsplash. “We wanted to find an inexpensive way of doing a really terrific kitchen,” says Daniel. “The metal, which is a cold-rolled sheet of blackened steel, is a unique material that will develop a patina over time, but will also be super durable—and again, very cost effective.”
In the kitchen, crisp white cabinets complement a walnut table from Space Furniture. Custom lighting from JD Lighting Tech emphasizes the verticality of the home. The dining chairs are from Industry West.
Sweet customized modular IKEA cabinetry and paired it with Caesarstone countertops in the kitchen. Penny tiles were used as the backsplash.
Open shelves balance out the hard-working wall of cabinetry opposite. "In a space like this, every fraction of an inch matters," says Jonathan, and making room for display and a sense of openness is also important.
The designers developed the preliminary schematic for the tile, then refined the layout on site. "We wanted to bring in six or seven different tiles that were all geometric and make it such that there's no pattern, there's no repeat. Everything is unique," says Jonathan. "Once we had the tiles, [we] laid things out and confirmed and made some adjustments. Everything is just a little different when you get it in real space."
The couple installed a window over the sink to brighten up the dark basement space. The counters are stainless steel, so as to cede nicely into the concrete wall rather than compete with it.
"The wonderful thing about this line of tile from Fireclay is that there's no order minimums," says Jonathan. Considering that the designers were dealing with such a small footprint, this meant that they didn’t have to order more tile than what was needed.
"We started to piece together this idea of a floor that's all just geometry and chaos, but that still honors the monochromatic elements of the space and highlights the bluish-gray-green tones of the original cement walls," says Jonathan.
The trusses were made by the building team from solid Australian hardwood and are critical in supporting the roof structure where the mezzanine level previously sat.
The baby-blue cabinets contrast with a white subway-tiled backsplash and mosaic-tiled flooring. A large bay window overlooks the front driveway and lawn, while allowing tons of natural light into the space.
Along the left-hand side of the main entrance is a spacious kitchen and family room in the back. A massive, marble-topped island wraps around to form bar seating along one end.
Use black as an accent shade in a kitchen that gets lots of natural light, especially when it can highlight architectural details.
By removing walls, inserting new windows, and utilizing a lighter color palette, Mowery Marsh Architects give this historic home a modern, new look.
"Go with your gut, and don’t be afraid to mix things up as you go along," Owens advises. "Originally we didn’t have open shelves flanking the hood, but we added them at the last minute and now it’s one of my favorite elements of the space."
After purchasing the home actor Matthew Perry brought in his own team, including architect Scott Joyce and interior designer LM Pagano, to redesign the space for luxe, modern living.
A hammered copper farmhouse sink from Sinkology and copper hardware from Decorator Hardware contrast warmth against the blue and green tones of the cabinetry. The existing wood flooring was kept, just sanded and stained to match other areas of the house.
"Where the house sits, it’s sandwiched between these two structures," says Garry. This made accessing good natural light and views a challenge. A breakthrough move in the design consisted of installing windows on the north wall with glass-backed cabinets over them, thereby admitting natural light into the house, but not giving less-than-ideal views of surrounding buildings too much visual weight.
A glimpse down the aisle of the El Toro. The Hobbit wood stove from Salamander Stoves is a cozy accent.
The home’s open floor plan allows for easy flow between the living room and kitchen. Tall ceilings make the property feel much larger than its actual size.
In the garden apartment kitchen, IKEA cabinet boxes received fronts from Reform, in the Basis style. An Andrew Neyer Barbell Pendant echoes the black two-inch hex wall tile. The black wire and wood open shelves are the client’s own and similar to the String Pocket Shelf, says the firm.
An elongated, pink terrazzo kitchen island accommodates larger gatherings; it extends all the way into the dining area. Powder-blue cabinets provide a cool contrast.
Via Media Residence by Matt Fajkus Architecture | Photo by Leonid Furmansky
Via Media Residence by Matt Fajkus Architecture | Photo by Leonid Furmansky
Via Media Residence by Matt Fajkus Architecture | Photo by Leonid Furmansky
The kitchen's central island is particularly luminous when sunlight pours down through the skylight.
Dining takes place at the large custom-fabricated table underneath pendant lighting. Seating is a mix of Eames Shell Chairs and Real Good chairs from Blu Dot.
An L-shaped skylight is the highlight of the kitchen, from which views of the garden and pool are visible.
The consistent use of light wood makes the interior finishes appear to recede while directing attention to the views outside.
The sleek, modern kitchen is perfect for cooking and entertaining, with a large island and designer appliances.
“We chose a gray veined marble (Vermont Royal Danby, from ABC Worldwide) for the kitchen counter,” Barker says. “We found bleached walnut floors from Madera to tie the parlor floor together.”

The modern kitchen is the heart of the home. Cooking and conversing go hand-in-hand as meals are created, memories made. Whether teaching an old family recipe, reading the newspaper in a breakfast nook, or chatting over the daily morning coffee, the ritual of the everyday begins here. Spark your imagination by browsing our collection of modern kitchens. From popular counter materials like marble, granite, quartz, and wood; to stunning examples of white cabinets; to flooring options like hardwood and concrete, these projects showcase it all. You'll also find ideas for backsplashes, lighting, appliances, and sinks.