459 Kitchen Concrete Floors Wood Cabinets Design Photos And Ideas

The open-plan kitchen is finished with wood cabinetry, a bright white tile backsplash, and concrete flooring.
The kitchen and wet bar open out into the living area. Timber joinery adds warmth to the interior and contrasts with more industrial materials, such as the steel and concrete.
The kitchen features custom cabinetry and Caesarstone countertops.
The dining area features a Cherner table and Series 7 chairs by Arne Jacobson that are brightly colored to represent the color wheel.
A curving skylight illuminates the minimalist kitchen of a dwelling in Bondi Beach, Australia, that was renovated by Andrew Burges Architects.
In California's idyllic Sea Ranch community, a vacation home privileges views of the Pacific Ocean and fog-shrouded trees. The bright and airy interiors, following a crisp, Scandinavian aesthetic, are pared back to retain focus on the spectacular surroundings.
The kitchen bench extends to create a breakfast bar for casual dining.
The kitchen is located behind the dining space and features a concrete counter—a reference to the industrial-style architecture.
A wall of full-height cabinetry spans one side of the kitchen, complete with inset shelving that provides a dedicated area for the couple’s coffee machine and mugs. The space also features a large central island and dining table overlooking the backyard pool.
Lalita stands in front of the coffee nook in the couple’s kitchen—one of several details that relates to their shared Brazilian heritage. Her childhood was split between São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro, while Fabio grew up in São Paulo before moving to various cities around the world as part of his career in advertising.
The architects created built-in storage to show off Frank and Amy’s extensive LEGO collection. A glimpse of the couple’s collection can be seen on the left.
In the kitchen, concrete floors and counters are offset by wood cabinetry and doors that add warmth to the space.
The cabinetry in the kitchen is rift-sawn, dark-stained white oak that complements the ceilings and contrasts with the white walls. The dark-pigmented concrete floors were intentionally left untreated in order to convey a sense of time. “As the home ages, the floor ‘records’ the construction process, foot traffic, wine spilled at birthday parties, drips of olive oil from anniversary dinners, watermarks from relaxing showers, and so on,” says architect Hunter Gundersen. “Every action will be subtly set in stone before it’s quickly cleaned up or swept away. Over the years, a patina of life will build up, adding depth and beauty to the interior.”
The custom cabinetry with pronounced wood grain is one of the materials chosen for its haptic qualities.
Whitewashed Tasmanian oak slats line the ceiling of the kitchen, which is designed to be hard-wearing for a family with a passion for cooking. Custom joinery surrounds the space.
The kitchen has become a lab for Scott’s food experiments and a studio for his ventures, such as the Acid League—a startup that makes artisanal “living vinegar” and condiments.
In the kitchen, the raised walkway to the left is raised to a height of 450 millimeters to make it double as a comfortable seating option. The kitchen Stone Italia Jaipur Pepper countertop was built to a height of 900 millimeters so that it can also function as a seat.
The all-electric kitchen features oak cabinetry and a marble countertop.
The oak island and cupboards offset the kitchen’s black IKEA cabinetry.
Birch plywood with a white wash forms the cabinetry in the kitchen and the island is topped with marble. Perimeter counters are Corian. The faucet is Astra Walker and the cabinet handles are Made Measure.
The kitchen is anchored by a deep window seat with views of the harbor. “My favorite place in the house is the built-in deep daybed off the kitchen, from where I like to look out onto the water with a book in hand,” says Fox. “Having the view of the water and getting cozy in that spot is perfect.”
Another view of the kitchen reveals fittingly minimalist black-and-white artwork.
Oak and concrete surfaces mingle in the kitchen, where views of the landscape are framed through a window and the sliding glass door that opens onto the cedar-clad patio.
The homeowners are both in the creative field, with connections to a slew of talented artists. What hangs on the walls is only a small portion of their collection.
The kitchen island is made of poured terrazzo, balanced atop a mirrored slab and two orange posts for a playful, postmodern vibe.
There is no overhead lighting here, but that’s just fine by Szczerbicki, who prefers to avoid “blasting one massive level of light.” Working closely with The Lighting Guild, he went for a more layered approach. Above the cabinetry, LED lights point up to illuminate the rafter, and a custom, linear pendant hangs above the island. “Every piece of lighting was designed with a specific task in mind,” says Szczerbicki. “As it gets darker, you slowly turn on key lights in key locations so the light level gradually grows.”
Exposed brick from the original structure remains as an “echo of the house that was here before,” says Szczerbicki.
The countertops and cabinetry in the kitchen were constructed on-site from terrazzo and reclaimed wood.
The kitchen and dining area opens out to a narrow balcony that overlooks the internal courtyard and has views over the bay. The DC09 dining chairs are by Inoda + Sveje for Miyazaki Chair Company, and sourced from Great Dane Furniture.
The kitchen cabinetry, counters, and walls are covered with pale birch panels that lend lightness and texture.
The maple farmhouse table doubles as a kitchen island. The custom sink can be used as a perch for the cutting board, and a small tabletop garden provides herbs for cooking.
“The home wasn’t an inexpensive house to build,” says architect Peter Tolkin. “At the same time, it doesn’t have very fancy interior finishing. We wanted to design a modern house with a certain kind of spirit, and we didn’t think that the interior materials needed to be overly fancy. The two places where we really splurged—I think to great effect—were on the tiles in the bathrooms and kitchen, and the copper cladding, which protects the house but also has a very strong visual component to it.”
The double-height volume over the kitchen and living room creates an airy feel. An elevator provides an alternate way to ascend to the upper levels.
The mezzanine is fenced by slats of whitewashed pine, and acts as the children’s playroom and hangout space.
In the kitchen, a concrete Caesarstone countertop echoes the flooring material; the slatted pine mezzanine is a nod to the ceiling finish. “Everything is referencing something else,” says Armstrong.
Light oak panels by Finsa clad both the kitchen cabinetry and the built-in units that appear in the living room and entryway. "We used natural materials where we could, but we were also mindful of keeping high-touch surfaces durable," explains Anne-Marie Armstrong, co-principal of AAmp Studio.
To further improve the acoustics of the open floor plan, a walnut-slatted, acoustic felt-backed dropped panel with integrated LEDs hangs above the kitchen island.
The south-facing view from the kitchen looks out over the pool and mountains in the distance.
Bert Frank Masina brass-and-opal glass pendant lamps hang above the bespoke terrazzo island designed and installed by Diespeker.
The elegant kitchen cabinetry was built with oil-treated oak on a birch interior structure. The backsplash is Confiserie Blush Chevron Mosaic by Claybrook, and the wall lights are Brass Cylinder Lamps by Dyke and Dean.
The kitchen features Ikea cabinets, soapstone countertops, and steel backsplash. The oak panel doors conceal additional storage and mechanicals.
Ice Green marble from Signorino Stone forms the backsplash and countertops. The island bench was custom built with 2PAC grooved MDF in the front and Tasmanian oak legs. The bespoke kitchen hood is made from folded metal with a bronze detail seam up the middle.
The open-plan living space enjoys a seamless connection with the outdoors. The kitchen stools are by Earl Pinto.
A scullery sits behind the kitchen.
The kitchen island features a top made from concrete and rimu, a native New Zealand timber. As rimu is no longer harvested, the piece was pulled from a swamp and is potentially around 1,000 years old. The split between the concrete and timber reflects the split between the flooring materials. “The faceted form of the island ties into our concept and links to the fractured forms on the exterior of the house,” says Craig.
The spotted gum joinery in the kitchen dissolves into the sliding screen that divides the library/study from the living area. Brass details, such as the handles and the seat of the stool, add warmth to the material palette.
The kitchen counters are Pietra Gray marble, which complements the refinement of the spotted gum timber joinery.
The kitchen is located in a bespoke timber joinery unit that divides the “living shed.” The timber has been stained black to contrast with the surrounding timber cladding, and brass counters and backsplashes echo the use of brass details throughout the interior. “Brass was a very special material—used sparingly—that has come to be a hallmark of the project,” says architect Ben Shields.
Kitchen
The Heath Tile kitchen backsplash features the Alabaster colorway of the Mural series, which features six different glaze blends. The subtle variation complements the plasterwork and white oak timber used throughout the interior.
A local blacksmith fabricated metal elements for the doors, shelves, and light fittings throughout the house.
The dining table and chairs in the kitchen were handcrafted by the homeowner from timber harvested on-site.
The communal kitchen in the main house provides a space for guests to gather and cook together. This space is sleek and modern with hardware-less marine-grade plywood cabinets and a large, concrete island with seating.
The front and back doors are only 12 feet apart from one another, separated by the living space at the heart of the home. The open floor plan allows the living space, den, dining room, and kitchen to flow into each other, while the way the volumes are positioned makes each space feel distinct—this works well for entertaining both large and small groups.
A full-length skylight above the floating steel shelf in the kitchen allows light to stream across the Venetian plaster wall and bounce off the high-gloss white shelf. “It creates an ever-changing and ethereal experience,” says designer Jamie Chioco. The ceramic dishes and plates displayed on the shelf are from Kinn Home.

The modern kitchen is the heart of the home. Cooking and conversing go hand-in-hand as meals are created, memories made. Whether teaching an old family recipe, reading the newspaper in a breakfast nook, or chatting over the daily morning coffee, the ritual of the everyday begins here. Spark your imagination by browsing our collection of modern kitchens. From popular counter materials like marble, granite, quartz, and wood; to stunning examples of white cabinets; to flooring options like hardwood and concrete, these projects showcase it all. You'll also find ideas for backsplashes, lighting, appliances, and sinks.