364 Kitchen White Cabinets Wood Cabinets Design Photos And Ideas

Creating a natural flow from the interior to the exterior gardens was an important factor in the design. As a result of this approach, the kitchen opens out to the new deck through a large, floor-to-ceiling glazed door—one of the most expensive features of the renovation. The kitchen island is wrapped in the same tongue-and-groove timber panelling as the walls.
Vermont Danby Marble along the countertops features blue veining that nods to the home's waterfront location. Sliding glass doors open the dining area to the surrounding outdoor space.
The kitchen has a large central island, with the range and workspaces on the right and a huge built-in on the left in front of the stair. A bright, white laminate wall holds the oven and refrigerator. Architect Nicholas Fiore says this element “pumps the brakes a bit” on the white oak shiplap walls and white oak ceiling.
The modest U-shaped kitchen has an open peninsula on one side.
The kitchen was relocated to give the living area more breathing room. A slat detail above the beams bring attention to the preserved roof structure.
A wall of full-height cabinetry spans one side of the kitchen, complete with inset shelving that provides a dedicated area for the couple’s coffee machine and mugs. The space also features a large central island and dining table overlooking the backyard pool.
Lalita stands in front of the coffee nook in the couple’s kitchen—one of several details that relates to their shared Brazilian heritage. Her childhood was split between São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro, while Fabio grew up in São Paulo before moving to various cities around the world as part of his career in advertising.
The cabinetry in the kitchen is rift-sawn, dark-stained white oak that complements the ceilings and contrasts with the white walls. The dark-pigmented concrete floors were intentionally left untreated in order to convey a sense of time. “As the home ages, the floor ‘records’ the construction process, foot traffic, wine spilled at birthday parties, drips of olive oil from anniversary dinners, watermarks from relaxing showers, and so on,” says architect Hunter Gundersen. “Every action will be subtly set in stone before it’s quickly cleaned up or swept away. Over the years, a patina of life will build up, adding depth and beauty to the interior.”
To increase the visual space, Herrmann took advantage of the bucolic, hillside setting, and made it a vital part of the interior experience. Every room features at least one large window, each showcasing a different view of the ever-changing landscape: mountains from the living room, woods from the kitchen, and wooded hillsides from the rooms upstairs.
In the kitchen, alder-veneer cabinets contrast nicely with white-painted shiplap doors. White quartz countertops keep things feeling clean and bright. On the wall, tiles from Clé are mounted with no grout.
Andrew used to work at vintage furniture and lighting stores back in New York, and developed a taste for midcentury lighting, which he brought to their new space in Nashville.
A a slight step separates the addition from the original building. “You walk through 100 years of the house, and then transition out of that space,” says Dean.
The homeowners are both in the creative field, with connections to a slew of talented artists. What hangs on the walls is only a small portion of their collection.
The kitchen island is made of poured terrazzo, balanced atop a mirrored slab and two orange posts for a playful, postmodern vibe.
There is no overhead lighting here, but that’s just fine by Szczerbicki, who prefers to avoid “blasting one massive level of light.” Working closely with The Lighting Guild, he went for a more layered approach. Above the cabinetry, LED lights point up to illuminate the rafter, and a custom, linear pendant hangs above the island. “Every piece of lighting was designed with a specific task in mind,” says Szczerbicki. “As it gets darker, you slowly turn on key lights in key locations so the light level gradually grows.”
The kitchen opens out into the dining room and living area, and features an island countertop from Caesarstone. The lighting throughout is from Liteline.
The mezzanine is fenced by slats of whitewashed pine, and acts as the children’s playroom and hangout space.
In the kitchen, a concrete Caesarstone countertop echoes the flooring material; the slatted pine mezzanine is a nod to the ceiling finish. “Everything is referencing something else,” says Armstrong.
A soapstone apron-front sink with an integrated drainboard adds a simple yet luxe touch. The single floating shelf puts everyday dishes close by without creating visual clutter.
Custom cherry cabinetry with integrated handles and sliding doors brings a furniture-like component to the open kitchen. Three 1960s Scandinavian flush mounts by Arnold Wiigs Fabrikker brighten the soapstone counter, while two cognac leather stools by Afteroom for MENU are tucked beneath.
Lever set the pavilion a few feet away from the sliding glass Fleetwood doors to make sure that natural light could still enter the home. The pavilion features a Havsten sofa and lounge by IKEA, along with a Finn coffee table by Norm Architects for Design Within Reach.
The kitchen, which was moved to the sunny side of the house, embraces Anyeley’s taste for simple, modern forms. Cabinetry painted in Hague Blue by Farrow & Ball surrounds a central island fitted with Nerd bar stools by Muuto and a Dot Line Suspension pendant by Lambert & Fils. Completing the kitchen is a Litze faucet by Brizo and a Crosstown sink by Elkay, along with rangetop and wall ovens by Dacor and a Benchmark refrigerator from Bosch.
In the kitchen, simple farmhouse cabinetry was given a gray-green faux finish to complement the mahogany butcher-block countertops. “The client had started a renovation of the kitchen that he didn't like at all, but he didn't want to pay for new cabinets,” says architect Michael Poris. “So, we worked with the cabinets he had already installed and painted them.”
A mirrored backsplash reflects the garden. Spotted Gum cabinetry meets floors of the same material for uninterrupted flow. The counters are stainless steel.
Integrated appliances avoid clutter in the petite galley layout.
The kitchen features Ikea cabinets, soapstone countertops, and steel backsplash. The oak panel doors conceal additional storage and mechanicals.
The open galley kitchen flows seamlessly into the living room. The joinery is hoop-pine plywood, which echoes the materiality of the ceiling and walls.
An open shelf displays the couple’s glassware collection.
Now, the kitchen has walnut cabinetry with inset doors painted a creamy white. The counter is marble, and the backsplash is the Classic Field tile in chartreuse from Heath Ceramics. The floors are new linoleum.
Angelica Becerril prepares food at the kitchen island; the Carrara marble countertop is one of the few luxury materials used in the house.
Terrazzo flooring replaced the existing porcelain tile floor. "The terrazzo floor is about coming up with this lovely texture that wasn’t just polished concrete," explains Carter.
The kitchen island was handcrafted with 30-millimeter Tasmanian Oak half-round dowels. "The [curved form] became a real feature of the house which was mimicked in details such as the timber island and doorway threshold," explains Peake. The countertop is Carrara marble from Avant Stone.
"We always like to do floor-to-ceiling curtains: we feel it's softer and more intentional," says Peake. The light above the island is a Span Linear Pendant from Living Edge.
"For every new project, I try to find the best solution. If a round island is the best solution, then we will design more round kitchens," explains Otten. "But I prefer to be on a continuous search and [in a constant state of] evolution."
Otten chose a light color palette of soft green lacquer set against sandblasted pine veneer to keep the space looking as fresh as possible. "The round form on the ceiling is just to hide the cooking hood," he says.
The view back into the kitchen frames the inset wood shelves, and allows one component of the work triangle, the stove, to stay tucked out of sight.
Interior Designer Stephanie Dyer in the completed project.
Dyer Studio custom-designed the island with a black-stained white oak wood base and a walnut and soapstone counter that curves at both ends.
Dyer was inspired by all of the original curved details throughout the home, and wove subtle references into the kitchen’s design, including the scalloped detail in the stone counter and backsplash, the curving walls of the stove alcove, and at the coved ceilings.
Removing the dropped ceilings had a dramatic effect on the perceived size of the room. “I think the ceiling height alone changed how that space felt,” says Dyer.
The team added a bank of windows above the sink to flood the room with light. The ceiling pendants are from Allied Maker and the stool is the Cherner Counter Stool from Design Within Reach.
The color of the BlueStar range references the dining room.
Per the clients’ request, the kitchen skews to a predominantly white color palette, with the bespoke island providing contrast.
Previously, a small bathroom was located off the kitchen space. By relocating the bathroom elsewhere in the home, this freed up space for a large walk-in pantry where all the food and clutter could hide, and even the fridge.
The double-duty kitchen island is a simple offshoot that contrasts with the industrial countertops.
The home’s philosophy was inspired by the works of Alvar Aalto and Louis Kahn. The use of locally available and low-cost pine and Carrara stone gives it an almost Scandinavian sensibility, which the couple describe as “Scandi meets carpentry modernism.”
Large sliding glass doors enable seamless indoor/outdoor living. The fluid, open floor plan provides plenty of room for entertaining, play, and gathering.
In the kitchen, oak millwork pairs with simple matte black cabinetry and stone accents. Sphere pendant lights from Hub Furniture hang above the island seating, adding a simple, playful touch to the open space. Connected to the garden and main living area, the kitchen is now the ideal location for gathering with friends and family.
The floors, cabinet face frames, upper wall panels, and the tops of the bathroom and shower are made from a recycled and re-milled factory maple and beech blend from Longleaf Lumber in Berwick, Maine. The couple kept two of the original cage doors: one at the front, and the other at the back of the bus.
This 720-square-foot apartment in Barcelona was renovated and opened up by Nook Architects. Key to the design are the original barrel-vaulted ceilings, which are mimicked in the mixed-use gallery in the front. What was once a central hallway dividing multiple rooms—typical of older apartments—became a new common space that flows into the gallery. Materials were also limited exclusively to those already present in the space—namely, wood, ceramic, and marble. A canopy of original terra-cotta tiles line the barrel-vaulted ceilings, and a minimal aesthetic ties it all together.
This artfully minimalist Australian kitchen combines concrete, oak, steel, and prefabricated panels with a substantial marble countertop and backsplash.
The kitchen has a simple design and utilizes low-cost materials so that the client could fabricate it using a limited selection of tools.
The yellow stair is echoed by a matching yellow backsplash in the kitchen.

The modern kitchen is the heart of the home. Cooking and conversing go hand-in-hand as meals are created, memories made. Whether teaching an old family recipe, reading the newspaper in a breakfast nook, or chatting over the daily morning coffee, the ritual of the everyday begins here. Spark your imagination by browsing our collection of modern kitchens. From popular counter materials like marble, granite, quartz, and wood; to stunning examples of white cabinets; to flooring options like hardwood and concrete, these projects showcase it all. You'll also find ideas for backsplashes, lighting, appliances, and sinks.