514 Kitchen White Cabinets Wall Oven Design Photos And Ideas

"The lighting works because we have these black accents: black door handles, the black painting on the metal stairs," says Cousins Wilson.
The kitchen is designed to prioritize open floor space, which gives owners Elina and Otto options while entertaining.
Loader Monteith tends to have a "fabric-first" approach to sustainability. Any work happening on the roof or walls received a thick coat of insulation, and all glass is triple-glazed. "It’s like the house has a warm hat and jacket and a dry pair of Welly boots," says Loader. "Once you’ve done a lot of the hard work, you can make the heating system as small as possible." Photovoltaic solar panels on the roof collect energy throughout the day.
The ceiling’s glued laminated timber, or glulam, beams got treated with Osmo oil to temper the yellowish tone. (The couple’s cat, Zinzan, is named after the captain of the All Blacks, New Zealand’s national rugby team.)
The floors are an engineered hardwood oak, limewashed with a tumbled finish. The dining table is a hand-me-down from Daisy’s parents. Upstairs, the primary bedroom opens right up onto a rooftop terrace, but for nights when Pete and Daisy feel like hosting, Loader installed an Arne Jacobsen–inspired, thin spiral staircase on the outside for guests to climb.
The kitchen has a large central island, with the range and workspaces on the right and a huge built-in on the left in front of the stair. A bright, white laminate wall holds the oven and refrigerator. Architect Nicholas Fiore says this element “pumps the brakes a bit” on the white oak shiplap walls and white oak ceiling.
White plasterboard walls and white kitchen cabinetry maintain a simple palette for the home, letting the views take center stage.
Along Victoria’s Surf Coast, a minimalist timber dwellingcombines Scandinavian charm with the laid-back vibes of a New Zealand bach.
The Bracy Cottage — Kitchen, Dining Room, Living Room
The Bracy Cottage — Kitchen + Dining Room
Plaster, brick, wood, and basalt lava stone create a rough and refined mix of materials in the kitchen.
A sizable primary bedroom and a sleeping loft above a bathroom flank the kitchen area.
The interior of the tiny home, which features a sleeping loft above the living room, is finished with vinyl flooring and white pine walls.
To increase the visual space, Herrmann took advantage of the bucolic, hillside setting, and made it a vital part of the interior experience. Every room features at least one large window, each showcasing a different view of the ever-changing landscape: mountains from the living room, woods from the kitchen, and wooded hillsides from the rooms upstairs.
The architect placed the windows at Sabrina’s eye level so that she’d be able to see her son, Rocco, playing in the yard outside. "You can feel the seasons changing here," says Chiavelli. "I grew up three miles from here, outside in nature. This is a house for experiencing life."
In the kitchen, alder-veneer cabinets contrast nicely with white-painted shiplap doors. White quartz countertops keep things feeling clean and bright. On the wall, tiles from Clé are mounted with no grout.
The homeowners are both in the creative field, with connections to a slew of talented artists. What hangs on the walls is only a small portion of their collection.
Practical stainless-steel appliances fit right into this friendly, unfussy space.
There is no overhead lighting here, but that’s just fine by Szczerbicki, who prefers to avoid “blasting one massive level of light.” Working closely with The Lighting Guild, he went for a more layered approach. Above the cabinetry, LED lights point up to illuminate the rafter, and a custom, linear pendant hangs above the island. “Every piece of lighting was designed with a specific task in mind,” says Szczerbicki. “As it gets darker, you slowly turn on key lights in key locations so the light level gradually grows.”
Rather than covering the ceiling completely with a sheet or board, Szczerbicki tucked the insulation above the rafters and sealed it in so that the ceiling’s structure was still visible. Painted in white, it becomes a sculptural element that highlights the volume of the space.
Low-VOC, zero-formaldehyde white plywood cabinets, a subway-tile backsplash, and stone counters run through the kitchen.
 “We did a style of kitchen that you would find in Oaxaca,” says the designer. It’s simple and durable, and made for cooking any type of food.
An assortment of vintage glassware fills the open shelves, as well as ceramics from Don Corleon picked up on a trip to Italy.
The quirky tiled kitchen holds much of its original charm and is Natalie’s favorite room. The rug is the Schumacher Charlap Hyman & Herrero Caiman Alligator rug from Chairish.
The kitchen, which was moved to the sunny side of the house, embraces Anyeley’s taste for simple, modern forms. Cabinetry painted in Hague Blue by Farrow & Ball surrounds a central island fitted with Nerd bar stools by Muuto and a Dot Line Suspension pendant by Lambert & Fils. Completing the kitchen is a Litze faucet by Brizo and a Crosstown sink by Elkay, along with rangetop and wall ovens by Dacor and a Benchmark refrigerator from Bosch.
“The most important thing was to bring a sense of authenticity to the project, like it really couldn’t exist anywhere else or for anyone else,” says architect Jodi Batay-Csorba.
The kitchen is illuminated by the largest of several light wells. A dining table from Batay-Csorba flanks the end of an island, which also features a Disegno D4 faucet by Aquadesign and a XOOTUBE 38 IP40 pendant by LED Linear handing overhead. The space also features a Gaggenau cooktop along the opposite side.
The backsplash in the kitchen is a frameless sliding window that offers natural cross ventilation. It currently frames the ti-tree fencing, but as the landscaping grows greenery will be visible.
The material palette is subtle, with a few feature elements. In the kitchen, for example, white cabinetry matches the wall finish for a seamless appearance, while the marble countertop is a nod to the owners’ Italian heritage and provides a natural focal point for entertaining.
A mirrored backsplash reflects the garden. Spotted Gum cabinetry meets floors of the same material for uninterrupted flow. The counters are stainless steel.
Integrated appliances avoid clutter in the petite galley layout.
The kitchen’s Caesarstone Pure White countertop extends to the winding tread at the base of the stairs leading up to the mezzanine. Black granite covers the island.
The exposed Corinthian columns beautifully accent the white Valcucine kitchen.
The kitchen is equipped with Sub-Zero and Wolf appliances, and the cabinet faces and handles match the built-ins in the other rooms.
The sleek kitchen is separated from the living area and dining room. A glass sliding door on the south side connects the kitchen to an outdoor dining area and kitchen with wood-burning brick ovens.
A dramatic black island is expertly balanced by a wall of white cabinetry and a refrigerator that blends perfectly. The kitchen’s black countertops were cut from Nero Assoluto granite. The sink and faucet are from Quebec-based company Rubi. Appliances are from Wolf.
The open kitchen and the adjacent bench are a mix of materials that include HPL, sandblasted pine plywood, brass, marble, and lacquer.
The shelving is composed of simple, Mondrian-like color blocking.
Since the family has three young children, easy-to-clean surfaces were a must.
A small kitchen tucked in the corner received cosmetic updates during the renovation.
More beadboard paneling and cabinets accessorized with retro knobs and drawer pulls maintain the traditional feel of the home, while modern updates include Soapstone countertops, a sleek faucet, and new appliances including a Dacor range and Summit fridge.
The double-duty kitchen island is a simple offshoot that contrasts with the industrial countertops.
The home’s philosophy was inspired by the works of Alvar Aalto and Louis Kahn. The use of locally available and low-cost pine and Carrara stone gives it an almost Scandinavian sensibility, which the couple describe as “Scandi meets carpentry modernism.”
Set within the East Asian community of Richmond, BC, Curio House allows two Chinese scholars—the architect’s grandparents—to age in place. "I have a very close relationship with them," says Haeccity Studio Architecture cofounder Shirley Shen, "and it was kind of a family endeavor." The resulting design integrates principles from feng shui, a set of spatial laws meant to direct energy, and siheyuan, a historical courtyard house.
The kitchen pairs simple joinery and sleek fixtures with natural materials—like the elegant stone island and backsplash. The concealed hood and simple stone shelf keeps the design clean and tidy along the cooking prep area.
In the kitchen, oak millwork pairs with simple matte black cabinetry and stone accents. Sphere pendant lights from Hub Furniture hang above the island seating, adding a simple, playful touch to the open space. Connected to the garden and main living area, the kitchen is now the ideal location for gathering with friends and family.
"We needed a place to station the computer, and have one-on-one meetings with clients," explains Efrat of the new study. "However. I didn’t want to make the public space feel dark and small (by subtracting a chunk of it for a designated room). Another constraint was to have acoustic isolation, and the glass-walled room was the perfect solution for all of the above—it made the main living space feel more spacious since it enables light to pass through, yet separated it from the main living space acoustically and effectively."
In the kitchen, an oak counter warms white lacquered cabinetry and a marble backsplash. "The kitchen was one of the trickiest parts of the flat to design," Petillault says. "[It was located] in the center of the floor plan, one room away from the windows, [so] we decided to blend it into the living room."
The kitchen replaced a former hallway with custom-designed MDF cabinetry and an island topped with quartz.

The modern kitchen is the heart of the home. Cooking and conversing go hand-in-hand as meals are created, memories made. Whether teaching an old family recipe, reading the newspaper in a breakfast nook, or chatting over the daily morning coffee, the ritual of the everyday begins here. Spark your imagination by browsing our collection of modern kitchens. From popular counter materials like marble, granite, quartz, and wood; to stunning examples of white cabinets; to flooring options like hardwood and concrete, these projects showcase it all. You'll also find ideas for backsplashes, lighting, appliances, and sinks.