636 Kitchen White Cabinets Refrigerator Design Photos And Ideas

Natalie loved the original painted metal kitchen cabinets, elevating them with gray leather drawer pulls. She also removed the upper cabinets from the wall and added a patterned tile backsplash that extends to the ceiling. The kitchen island was removed, making room for a dining room table, and the ceiling light was replaced with an Orikata Saucer pendant light from Room & Board.
"The structure of House Tokyo was built with wood, which can still be seen in
the interior design of the residence," notes Unemori. "The open-plan kitchen and dining area were placed on the first floor where the spacious overhead area is dominated by the framework's wooden beams."
Thanks to an existing functional layout and adequate size, there wasn't much need to change the plan of the kitchen and the placement of appliances and plumbing.
"We had all white cabinets in our NY kitchen and wanted to try something different and more colorful here,
One of the owners is a chef, so the kitchen, featuring HAY Revolver bar stools,  naturally takes centerstage. Although it opens to the living room, the imposing butcher block ensures that cooks can be sealed away when maximum concentration is needed.
From the central kitchen island, there is a continuous line of sight to the garden. “Milli loves her indoor plants,” says builder Hamish White. “The tree views from most windows, and all the indoor plants makes you feel as if nature is never far away.”
“My favorite aspect of the project would have to be the custom-built planter/light box suspended over the island bench,” says interior designer Kate Lucas. “The cascading plants bring a gorgeous green accent to the interiors. I also have a soft spot for the herringbone floor.” The custom planter box was built by local furniture maker and friend Lee Gratton of Gratton Design.
Garcia specified display space, complete with a shelf, behind the Murphy bed, so that it “creates a moment” when the bed is folded down, the architect says.
Garcia says people often comment that the ADU just needs a refrigerator and dishwasher, not realizing that both are seamlessly concealed in the cabinetry. “It’s actually a fully-functioning kitchen,” says Garcia, including a 15-inch WOLF cooktop, a TK dishwasher drawer, and TK refrigerator drawer. The counter is Caesarstone.
"We give every client a questionnaire," Kevin says. "The first question asks what they need in their home. No compromise. The second question asks what they want in their home. And the third question asks what would blow their mind. At the end of the day, I’m looking to fit all of those things into their tiny home."
A short hall connects the kitchen to the bathroom and holds integrated shelving, a wardrobe, and an electrical box. The open stair treads leading up to the sleeping loft save on space and keep sight lines open.
Douglas fir paneling and ceiling beams punctuate the crisp white space, complementing Baltic birch plywood cabinetry and white oak countertops in the kitchen.
Connoisseurs of living tiny, Heather and Kevin Fritz started their own design-build business to offer truly custom solutions.
Vermont Danby Marble along the countertops features blue veining that nods to the home's waterfront location. Sliding glass doors open the dining area to the surrounding outdoor space.
Loader Monteith tends to have a "fabric-first" approach to sustainability. Any work happening on the roof or walls received a thick coat of insulation, and all glass is triple-glazed. "It’s like the house has a warm hat and jacket and a dry pair of Welly boots," says Loader. "Once you’ve done a lot of the hard work, you can make the heating system as small as possible." Photovoltaic solar panels on the roof collect energy throughout the day.
The floors are an engineered hardwood oak, limewashed with a tumbled finish. The dining table is a hand-me-down from Daisy’s parents. Upstairs, the primary bedroom opens right up onto a rooftop terrace, but for nights when Pete and Daisy feel like hosting, Loader installed an Arne Jacobsen–inspired, thin spiral staircase on the outside for guests to climb.
"The mixed metals play off that light-and-classic kitchen palette in the kitchen, while the dining area brings in the coziness of a lived-in home," Gebhardt says.
"Even a simple hardware swap or new lighting can transform a space, so keeping those core materials within a neutral palette allows for flexibility with updates over time," Gebhardt advises. "You really can’t go wrong with white oak, marble, and white-gray cabinetry." In the reimagined kitchen, Caesarstone quartz countertops meet Boston Arctic white subway tile, punctuated by Rejuvenation hardware. Meritage Hardwood Flooring was used throughout.
The kitchen has a large central island, with the range and workspaces on the right and a huge built-in on the left in front of the stair. A bright, white laminate wall holds the oven and refrigerator. Architect Nicholas Fiore says this element “pumps the brakes a bit” on the white oak shiplap walls and white oak ceiling.
In the kitchen and dining area, chairs from Nood slide under the island and surround a Maraetai table from The Axe.
A closer look at the kitchen, which is painted in a crisp white shade by Farrow & Ball.
White plasterboard walls and white kitchen cabinetry maintain a simple palette for the home, letting the views take center stage.
Along Victoria’s Surf Coast, a minimalist timber dwellingcombines Scandinavian charm with the laid-back vibes of a New Zealand bach.
The modest U-shaped kitchen has an open peninsula on one side.
The kitchen was relocated to give the living area more breathing room. A slat detail above the beams bring attention to the preserved roof structure.
The Bracy Cottage — Kitchen + Dining Room
A vaulted ceiling interspersed with skylights, in tandem with floor-to-ceiling glass, fills the home with natural light.
"We made a number of low-design-impact improvements to the existing part of the house as the contractors found some alarming errors in previous remodels," reveals Davis. "The house now feels ready for the next century."
The cabinetry in the kitchen is rift-sawn, dark-stained white oak that complements the ceilings and contrasts with the white walls. The dark-pigmented concrete floors were intentionally left untreated in order to convey a sense of time. “As the home ages, the floor ‘records’ the construction process, foot traffic, wine spilled at birthday parties, drips of olive oil from anniversary dinners, watermarks from relaxing showers, and so on,” says architect Hunter Gundersen. “Every action will be subtly set in stone before it’s quickly cleaned up or swept away. Over the years, a patina of life will build up, adding depth and beauty to the interior.”
A sizable primary bedroom and a sleeping loft above a bathroom flank the kitchen area.
To increase the visual space, Herrmann took advantage of the bucolic, hillside setting, and made it a vital part of the interior experience. Every room features at least one large window, each showcasing a different view of the ever-changing landscape: mountains from the living room, woods from the kitchen, and wooded hillsides from the rooms upstairs.
A ribbon window lines the counter and looks into the trees.
In the kitchen, alder-veneer cabinets contrast nicely with white-painted shiplap doors. White quartz countertops keep things feeling clean and bright. On the wall, tiles from Clé are mounted with no grout.
A a slight step separates the addition from the original building. “You walk through 100 years of the house, and then transition out of that space,” says Dean.
"I never want to make healthy living feel like this unattainable thing," says Keri. "I think it comes down to small steps people can take that eventually turn into a big-picture lifestyle. Eating whole foods, staying hydrated, getting enough sleep, and reducing stress all begin from square one." She designed her kitchen with help from Scavolini.
“We learned that in a home this size, every design decision needs to contribute both functionally and aesthetically to the space,” Robinson says. “The details matter even more when every inch is significant, so we got creative with how to make the most out of everything.” Polished quartzite countertops, Leicht cabinetry, and a backsplash of back-painted glass make the kitchen feel luxurious.
There is no overhead lighting here, but that’s just fine by Szczerbicki, who prefers to avoid “blasting one massive level of light.” Working closely with The Lighting Guild, he went for a more layered approach. Above the cabinetry, LED lights point up to illuminate the rafter, and a custom, linear pendant hangs above the island. “Every piece of lighting was designed with a specific task in mind,” says Szczerbicki. “As it gets darker, you slowly turn on key lights in key locations so the light level gradually grows.”
Rather than covering the ceiling completely with a sheet or board, Szczerbicki tucked the insulation above the rafters and sealed it in so that the ceiling’s structure was still visible. Painted in white, it becomes a sculptural element that highlights the volume of the space.
Low-VOC, zero-formaldehyde white plywood cabinets, a subway-tile backsplash, and stone counters run through the kitchen.
 “We did a style of kitchen that you would find in Oaxaca,” says the designer. It’s simple and durable, and made for cooking any type of food.
The kitchen opens out into the dining room and living area, and features an island countertop from Caesarstone. The lighting throughout is from Liteline.
An assortment of vintage glassware fills the open shelves, as well as ceramics from Don Corleon picked up on a trip to Italy.
The quirky tiled kitchen holds much of its original charm and is Natalie’s favorite room. The rug is the Schumacher Charlap Hyman & Herrero Caiman Alligator rug from Chairish.
A soapstone apron-front sink with an integrated drainboard adds a simple yet luxe touch. The single floating shelf puts everyday dishes close by without creating visual clutter.
Custom cherry cabinetry with integrated handles and sliding doors brings a furniture-like component to the open kitchen. Three 1960s Scandinavian flush mounts by Arnold Wiigs Fabrikker brighten the soapstone counter, while two cognac leather stools by Afteroom for MENU are tucked beneath.
The kitchen in The Sycamore features white-painted cabinetry, pine ceiling beams and flooring.
The kitchen, which was moved to the sunny side of the house, embraces Anyeley’s taste for simple, modern forms. Cabinetry painted in Hague Blue by Farrow & Ball surrounds a central island fitted with Nerd bar stools by Muuto and a Dot Line Suspension pendant by Lambert & Fils. Completing the kitchen is a Litze faucet by Brizo and a Crosstown sink by Elkay, along with rangetop and wall ovens by Dacor and a Benchmark refrigerator from Bosch.
In the kitchen, a pair of Swell LED pendants by Pablo Pardo from Design Within Reach hang above an island lined with Industry West stools. The appliances are from KitchenAid.
“The most important thing was to bring a sense of authenticity to the project, like it really couldn’t exist anywhere else or for anyone else,” says architect Jodi Batay-Csorba.
The kitchen is illuminated by the largest of several light wells. A dining table from Batay-Csorba flanks the end of an island, which also features a Disegno D4 faucet by Aquadesign and a XOOTUBE 38 IP40 pendant by LED Linear handing overhead. The space also features a Gaggenau cooktop along the opposite side.
The backsplash in the kitchen is a frameless sliding window that offers natural cross ventilation. It currently frames the ti-tree fencing, but as the landscaping grows greenery will be visible.
The material palette is subtle, with a few feature elements. In the kitchen, for example, white cabinetry matches the wall finish for a seamless appearance, while the marble countertop is a nod to the owners’ Italian heritage and provides a natural focal point for entertaining.
The home’s walls are clad in Oregon white oak reclaimed from a dismantled barn on the property. Jessica Helgerson chose to paint them white to create a bright, airy look, but she left the kitchen wall au naturel for a visual pop. With storage at a premium, the kitchen needed ample cabinetry as well as some ingenious solutions—including a pull-out cabinet hidden in one half of the range hood. A vintage cabinet on the left wall provides open storage for everyday dishes.
A mirrored backsplash reflects the garden. Spotted Gum cabinetry meets floors of the same material for uninterrupted flow. The counters are stainless steel.
Integrated appliances avoid clutter in the petite galley layout.
Roof lanterns illuminate the kitchen and dining area during the day. They are a low-maintenance alternative to skylights since they don't allow the forest's debris to accumulate and potentially block the natural light overhead.
Mighty Buildings have positioned themselves as a “production-as-a-service platform” to give homebuilders the opportunity to outsource the most labor-intensive aspects of construction.

The modern kitchen is the heart of the home. Cooking and conversing go hand-in-hand as meals are created, memories made. Whether teaching an old family recipe, reading the newspaper in a breakfast nook, or chatting over the daily morning coffee, the ritual of the everyday begins here. Spark your imagination by browsing our collection of modern kitchens. From popular counter materials like marble, granite, quartz, and wood; to stunning examples of white cabinets; to flooring options like hardwood and concrete, these projects showcase it all. You'll also find ideas for backsplashes, lighting, appliances, and sinks.