254 Kitchen Wall Oven Concrete Floors Design Photos And Ideas

White plasterboard walls and white kitchen cabinetry maintain a simple palette for the home, letting the views take center stage.
A curving skylight illuminates the minimalist kitchen of a dwelling in Bondi Beach, Australia, that was renovated by Andrew Burges Architects.
In California's idyllic Sea Ranch community, a vacation home privileges views of the Pacific Ocean and fog-shrouded trees. The bright and airy interiors, following a crisp, Scandinavian aesthetic, are pared back to retain focus on the spectacular surroundings.
The architects created built-in storage to show off Frank and Amy’s extensive LEGO collection. A glimpse of the couple’s collection can be seen on the left.
The Bracy Cottage — Kitchen, Dining Room, Living Room
The Bracy Cottage — Kitchen + Dining Room
Plaster, brick, wood, and basalt lava stone create a rough and refined mix of materials in the kitchen.
The custom cabinetry with pronounced wood grain is one of the materials chosen for its haptic qualities.
The open-plan living room, dining area and kitchen on the ground floor open up to the rear garden through folding glass doors. Concrete flooring helps improve thermal mass, while a minimalist palette of timber, stone and Equitone cement cladding used for a portion of the cabinet fronts help achieve a sleek and handsome look.
The all-electric kitchen features oak cabinetry and a marble countertop.
Birch plywood with a white wash forms the cabinetry in the kitchen and the island is topped with marble. Perimeter counters are Corian. The faucet is Astra Walker and the cabinet handles are Made Measure.
The kitchen is anchored by a deep window seat with views of the harbor. “My favorite place in the house is the built-in deep daybed off the kitchen, from where I like to look out onto the water with a book in hand,” says Fox. “Having the view of the water and getting cozy in that spot is perfect.”
The homeowners are both in the creative field, with connections to a slew of talented artists. What hangs on the walls is only a small portion of their collection.
There is no overhead lighting here, but that’s just fine by Szczerbicki, who prefers to avoid “blasting one massive level of light.” Working closely with The Lighting Guild, he went for a more layered approach. Above the cabinetry, LED lights point up to illuminate the rafter, and a custom, linear pendant hangs above the island. “Every piece of lighting was designed with a specific task in mind,” says Szczerbicki. “As it gets darker, you slowly turn on key lights in key locations so the light level gradually grows.”
Rather than covering the ceiling completely with a sheet or board, Szczerbicki tucked the insulation above the rafters and sealed it in so that the ceiling’s structure was still visible. Painted in white, it becomes a sculptural element that highlights the volume of the space.
The kitchen and dining area opens out to a narrow balcony that overlooks the internal courtyard and has views over the bay. The DC09 dining chairs are by Inoda + Sveje for Miyazaki Chair Company, and sourced from Great Dane Furniture.
 “We did a style of kitchen that you would find in Oaxaca,” says the designer. It’s simple and durable, and made for cooking any type of food.
The kitchen cabinetry, counters, and walls are covered with pale birch panels that lend lightness and texture.
To further improve the acoustics of the open floor plan, a walnut-slatted, acoustic felt-backed dropped panel with integrated LEDs hangs above the kitchen island.
The backsplash in the kitchen is a frameless sliding window that offers natural cross ventilation. It currently frames the ti-tree fencing, but as the landscaping grows greenery will be visible.
The material palette is subtle, with a few feature elements. In the kitchen, for example, white cabinetry matches the wall finish for a seamless appearance, while the marble countertop is a nod to the owners’ Italian heritage and provides a natural focal point for entertaining.
Ice Green marble from Signorino Stone forms the backsplash and countertops. The island bench was custom built with 2PAC grooved MDF in the front and Tasmanian oak legs. The bespoke kitchen hood is made from folded metal with a bronze detail seam up the middle.
The kitchen island features a top made from concrete and rimu, a native New Zealand timber. As rimu is no longer harvested, the piece was pulled from a swamp and is potentially around 1,000 years old. The split between the concrete and timber reflects the split between the flooring materials. “The faceted form of the island ties into our concept and links to the fractured forms on the exterior of the house,” says Craig.
"The kitchen is the heart of the home, where we can enjoy the simplicity of being together as a family," Montalba says.
A pantry and painting studio are tucked behind the kitchen, which is outfitted with black granite counters and oak cabinetry.
The homeowners love the flow of the kitchen, dining room, living room, and butler’s pantry—so much so that they've already had more parties since moving in than they did in 26 years at their prior residence.
The curved wood ceiling leads to a large oculi that brings in all-day sunshine and reinforces the home’s connection between inside and out.
In an apartment of only about 350 square feet, Madrid–based architectural firm elii has designed a functional layout with a bright palette that emphasizes light and views to the streetscape outside. The light green cabinetry keeps the apartment feeling bright, while the wood gives texture and a natural feeling to the space.
What was once a small dining area has been opened up into a bright kitchen, living, and dining space.
Black kitchen cabinetry and appliances reinforce the interior's contrasting color palette. The double-height space also emphasizes the structure's A-frame design with soaring ceilings.
The entire interior—including bespoke joinery and furniture—is crafted from timber.
The antler chandeliers above the kitchen table are from local lighting store Milton Lighting.
In the kitchen, a Bosch oven and Electrolux fridge join stools by Taller Capitán. A Belly pendant by Nordlux hangs overhead.
This artfully minimalist Australian kitchen combines concrete, oak, steel, and prefabricated panels with a substantial marble countertop and backsplash.
In the kitchen, there is a hidden pantry, appliance storage shelves, and a food prep area. A slide-away glass backsplash reveals additional cooking gadgets behind.
The warm textures and tones of the exterior are continued on the interior, where the brick walls are left exposed in certain areas. The poured-in-place concrete arches under the sink echo the arched doorways and barrel-vaulted ceilings.
"It doesn’t feel like a garage because Ramiro cut away the boxiness, but we could still roll a car in here," says Jorge. The refrigerator is by Haier; the range is by KitchenAid.
In this Australian kitchen, keeping the original exposed brick wall as a backsplash helps tie the kitchen to the rest of the home.
Here, an industrial material palette—with a concrete brick backsplash and counter foundation, and zinc-plated pan-decking ceilings—complement the development’s edgy facade.
Vibrant blue cabinets brighten up this kitchen and serve as a bold contrast to the exposed brick. The stainless-steel countertop wraps slightly up the wall, and creates a trough for storing items.
Brick, paired with concrete and wood, creates an organic warmth throughout this Spanish home.
In the kitchen, a glass backsplash is one of many connections to the outdoors. The Hee barstools are by Hay and the Highline pendant light is by Rakumba Lighting Australia.
This midcentury in Armonk, New York, was the personal residence of Arthur Witthoefft, an architect for renowned firm Skidmore, Owings & Merrill. Witthoefft won an AIA First Honor Award in 1962 for his design, and the home was listed on the Register of Historic Places in 2011 after a meticulous restoration profiled in Dwell. The kitchen was modernized with white lacquer and stainless steel.
The firm enlisted their Parisian carpenter to make the cabinets in the "Frey style and color"—stained maple topped with cream-colored quartz. Appliances are all Bertazzoni except for the refrigerator and freezer, which is a Frigidaire Professional. The brick wall would not have been original, but the firm kept it and hand-painted the surface in the style of Le Corbusier’s Parisian apartment.
SHED added oversized sliding glass doors which allow for indoor/outdoor living during the warmer months, while new wood cabinetry establishes a clean, minimalist aesthetic, and an oversized, marble-topped island with a table extension provides room to cook, eat, and entertain. Oversized sliding doors open to the expansive deck, while skylights fill the space with natural light—a necessity with Seattle's gray winter skies.
The punchy-colored base of the kitchen work table is a note of contrast against the predominant green accents. The table was custom-designed by Mariana de Delás & 2Monos Studio.
A family's dream of living in a converted warehouse becomes a reality when Zen Architects successfully transforms a leaky warehouse from the 1960s into a bright and airy family home—without compromising on comfort or energy efficiency. Bright yellow subway tiles complement dark teal cabinets and colorful dishware.
“The house is so well articulated—a piece of art in its own right—that I wanted the kitchen to flow and complement it as gracefully as possible,” Haley says. “I wanted a natural palette in the kitchen that would feel congruent with the natural elements flowing in and out of my home.”
The kitchen/dining space is oriented sideways, making the most of the narrow site and opening out onto the rear courtyard to create an indoor/outdoor living space.
Flooded with natural light through picture and clerestory windows from the E-Series by Andersen, the open living area is where the cabin feels most like a tree house.
The kitchen and dining area seamlessly flow from the living room. Designed for entertaining, the space offers a 20-person dining table, three Gaggenau ovens, and a massive central island.
Cedar Creek Residence in Texas sits on a seven-acre lakeside property much beloved to the client, who wanted a modern home that connects inside and out. "The goal of the design was to provide an artful and low-maintenance retreat that would blend in with the site," said Wernerfield Architecture, who worked on the project along with Emily Summers Design Associates. The stainless-steel kitchen system is by Bulthaup, and the countertop was fashioned by Brooklyn-based Wüd Furniture Design.
Due to its location under a lower ceiling, the kitchen gets the least amount of natural light in the home. However, Kiev-based architecture and design studio 2B.group mitigated this problem by using stainless-steel surfaces, which reflects sunlight streaming in through the dining and living.
Inspired by a love of camping, the Bush House, by Archterra, nods to California’s Case Study Houses, built from the 1940s to the 1960s. Set on a family cattle farm in a Western Australia coastal town on the Margaret River, Bush House marries a single-plane roof with a prefabricated steel frame support structure. A rammed-earth wall carries through the house into the outdoors, melding with oiled plywood, anodized aluminum, and salvaged furniture.
Their creative confections may ruin our diets, but we’re happy to be their taste testers anytime.

The modern kitchen is the heart of the home. Cooking and conversing go hand-in-hand as meals are created, memories made. Whether teaching an old family recipe, reading the newspaper in a breakfast nook, or chatting over the daily morning coffee, the ritual of the everyday begins here. Spark your imagination by browsing our collection of modern kitchens. From popular counter materials like marble, granite, quartz, and wood; to stunning examples of white cabinets; to flooring options like hardwood and concrete, these projects showcase it all. You'll also find ideas for backsplashes, lighting, appliances, and sinks.