480 Kitchen Range Wood Cabinets Design Photos And Ideas

Lago Vista by Dick Clark + Associates
This lovely kitchen features laminate cabinets by Danish brand Reform.
The kitchen cabinets are custom-made from 100-year-old wood purchased at Sliverado Salvage. There’s a breakfast nook and a nine-foot island finished in Tadelakt, a waterproof plaster often used in Moroccan architecture, creating a communal and open space that flows into the living room. "Tadelakt is such a beautiful material and provides an old-world, earthy feeling, but using it is very labor-intensive," says Elaine.
See Arch removed a wall to create a more spacious kitchen with a stronger visual connection to the dining area. The updated kitchen is outfitted with quartz countertops and Viking, Fisher Paykel, and Asko appliances.
Portland-base pastry chef Andrea Nicholas purchased a 1953 midcentury ranch whose 2,500 square feet needed "a lot of TLC." Nicholas hired architect Risa Boyer to design the renovation, which involved opening up the kitchen to the dining room and creating a contemporary open-plan living space.
The firm enlarged the opening to the courtyard to create better flow between inside and out.
Several stairs lead up to the kitchen while a spiral staircase leads down to a covered patio area. The wooden beams draw the eye past the island to clerestory windows and sliding glass doors on the other side.
Stucker and Veal custom designed and built the kitchen cabinets, finishing them in Farrow & Ball paint (Lamp Room Grey) to compliment the stone and wood.
The use of natural materials, such as the combination of stone and wood, evokes casual luxury that is also very livable.
A young Vancouver family asked Falken Reynolds Interiors to convert their waterfront vacation home on British Columbia’s Sunshine Coast into their primary residence. To facilitate livability for the foursome, an enlarged kitchen, complete with a large white island with wood hardware, was a major part of the renovation.
Developed by Lang Architecture, Hudson Woods is an eco-friendly, locally-sourced, 26-family community spread across 131 acres in the midst of the Hudson River Valley. In the kitchen of one of the cabins, dark-green subway tiles contrast with wood cabinetry and a marble-topped central island that was crafted from blackened steel and walnut.
The owners of this updated Tudor-style abode in the Los Angeles neighborhood of Eagle Rock, Amanda and William Hunter, are the design duo behind the William Hunter Collective, which rehabs homes. They reconfigured the 2,000-square-foot home to maximize space before tapping HGTV host and bestselling author Emily Henderson for the interior design. The resulting home blends traditional and modern design elements to create a "timeless and unique space." Handmade tile, soapstone counters, walnut wood, and steel make up the artfully styled kitchen.
For their DIY petite open kitchen, Kathrin and Brian Smirke designed the cabinets and had the boxes and doors made at a small cabinet shop in L.A. They also formed and poured the concrete countertops themselves and constructed the floating shelves with leftover clear pine and plywood.
The kitchen has been updated with a vintage vibe and seamlessly integrates into the home's clean midcentury style.
Rift sawn white oak cabinets in the kitchen.
Whereas others might look at a board-formed cement wall in a basement and see, well, a concrete wall, Jess and Jonathan Taylor, the design duo behind the L.A.-based firm Taylor + Taylor, were inspired. The couple had purchased a virtually untouched 1952 house in east L.A. and that concrete wall became the backdrop for a new guest kitchen in the basement. "It was really the starting point of the whole design," says Jess Taylor. "As designers, our goal is to always try to incorporate the existing surroundings whenever possible, utilize them in practical ways, and be inspired by them."
A look at the gourmet kitchen, which features a large center island and separate peninsula. Dark cabinetry contrasts with the room's crisp marble accents.
Black marble countertops and backsplash create a high-contrast look in the kitchen.
This backsplash may only cover a small surface area, but its asymmetric tiles are the kitchen’s pièce de résistance.
A pop of red provides the perfect accent for the kitchen, which features marble from New Age Granite and Tiles and appliances by GE, Thermador, and Miele.
Black appliances and fixtures blend seamlessly into the cabinetry. The lack of a large fridge helps give the kitchen its streamlined and minimal appearance. The couple carefully integrated appliances to make the small space fully functional for entertaining. Two CoolDrawers are tucked under the counter to chill wine and store enough food for the weekend. Two ovens allow home cooks to bake bread and roast meat simultaneously. “It just works really well for us,” says Daniel. “Our counter space is at a premium, and we just didn’t need a giant refrigerator. This way, we can have the L-shaped counter. That was a very strategic decision—it doesn’t need to be more than what it is.”
The blush-colored Rojo Alicante marble table in the center of the kitchen doubles as a dining table and kitchen island. A Craiglist score for $200, the table is another kitchen hack conceived by the architects. “It was really a diamond in the rough. Originally, it was a rectangle shape, in a weird ’90s, Italian kind of style, covered in a thick, resin-like finish that made it look almost orange,” says Daniel. The table was honed down to soften its color, and its top was reshaped with rounded corners.
In the kitchen, crisp white cabinets complement a walnut table from Space Furniture. Custom lighting from JD Lighting Tech emphasizes the verticality of the home. The dining chairs are from Industry West.
The open-concept kitchen offers modern conveniences while retaining much of its original detailing, including the custom cabinets and exposed ceiling beams. A picture window stretches across the countertops along one wall.
Harding went for Fisher & Paykel appliances, which disappear behind a wall of Tasmanian oak joinery.
Open shelves balance out the hard-working wall of cabinetry opposite. "In a space like this, every fraction of an inch matters," says Jonathan, and making room for display and a sense of openness is also important.
The designers developed the preliminary schematic for the tile, then refined the layout on site. "We wanted to bring in six or seven different tiles that were all geometric and make it such that there's no pattern, there's no repeat. Everything is unique," says Jonathan. "Once we had the tiles, [we] laid things out and confirmed and made some adjustments. Everything is just a little different when you get it in real space."
The couple installed a window over the sink to brighten up the dark basement space. The counters are stainless steel, so as to cede nicely into the concrete wall rather than compete with it.
"The wonderful thing about this line of tile from Fireclay is that there's no order minimums," says Jonathan. Considering that the designers were dealing with such a small footprint, this meant that they didn’t have to order more tile than what was needed.
"We started to piece together this idea of a floor that's all just geometry and chaos, but that still honors the monochromatic elements of the space and highlights the bluish-gray-green tones of the original cement walls," says Jonathan.
Harding went for simplicity in the kitchen, which features white backsplash tiles from Ceramica Vogue, a Ceaserstone countertop in Pure White, a Blanco sink with a Milli Inox fixture, and suface-mounted lights.
Equipped with an antique Garland stove and a custom teak wood island, the chef’s kitchen also provides direct access to the backyard. Also located on the garden level is an expansive sun room, media room, and custom-tiled powder room.
“We really wanted the materials in the house to feel very of-the-place,” says Lamaster. The architects hunted down domestic stone—like the Vermont marble used for countertops.
Of the counter material, Klymson says, “It's really one of the best Caesarstone products that I've seen out in the market.”
The kitchen features custom white oak kitchen cabinets stained light gray and Caesarstone rugged concrete countertops.
Part modern farmhouse, part gallery, this vacation home just outside Tahoe National Forest is composed of four distinct gable forms separated by square, stone-clad volumes. It was designed by Tahoe-based architect Clare Walton. The interiors were a collaborative effort between the owner, who is an artist and art collector, and interior designer Brittany Haines of ABD Studio. In the kitchen, a custom-made, six-person breakfast banquet, crafted from walnut, is organized around a table that features cold roll steel table top and a turned wood base that has been ebonized black.
The kitchen, built with imported Tasmanian oak and plywood, features one of the most beloved details from Pam’s Cross-Stitch House—a kitchen island with a mirrored base—but the floating bench here is shaped differently to represent Arthur. "[The mirror] lightens the space in many ways, so you don’t feel like the island is taking over," says Dunin. Graphic backsplash tiles fom Academy Tile run into laminate countertops with a plywood edge. The refrigerator is Fisher & Paykel, and the combo oven and cooktop is V-ZUG.
The client fell in love with this marble-and-quartz countertop, which is called Super White. The kitchen features a Gaggenau refrigerator, Julien sink, BlueStar range, and Ochre kitchen stools as well.
The new layout feels more open and spacious, thanks in part to strategic open shelving and chicken wire on the cabinet fronts. All of the bowls and boards are by Elsie Green, and the ceramics are from Jenni Kayne.
Their creative confections may ruin our diets, but we’re happy to be their taste testers anytime.
Just because your kitchen is on the smaller side doesn’t mean you can’t make it as efficient and effective as possible.
SVK Interior Design paired rich elm accents with matte-white laminate cabinets, gray-veined Caesarstone countertops, and show-stopping white Heath tile with dark grout.
The large space also features Gaggenau appliances, including a built-in refrigerator, double ovens, and five-burner cooktop.
The fully equipped, rustic-inspired chef's kitchen is just steps away from the dining room, which is accented by a large stone hearth. A wall of windows ushers ample natural lighting throughout.
A waterfall marble counter wraps the kitchen peninsula.
Local furniture maker Nick Tretiak created a custom kitchen table and bench, over which hangs a Noguchi paper lantern. The team wanted to keep the cabinetry as light as possible, designing white oak cabinets that read more as furniture.
The open kitchen is equipped with plenty of flexible cabinet space, open shelving, and built-in wine storage.
Rhode Partners chose KitchenAid appliances, brass pendants, a French Door-style refrigerator, and a U Line 1000 series Beverage Center.
The building is 6,500 square feet, so each loft feels spacious and airy. The arched windows, which rest in the original openings, let in light and views of the adjacent oak sanctuary.
In the kitchen, flat slab cabinetry is finished with gray-blue paint and quartz countertops. A new pantry located behind the kitchen holds the refrigerator, microwave, and pantry shelving.
A new banquette seating area tucked off the kitchen links to the breakfast terrace and has great views. "That's a nice perch to sit in and enjoy the kitchen and the landscape," says Woofter. Carolyn Woofter designed the custom copper hood to sync with the La Cornue stove beneath it.
Black granite counters top fir cabinets, and are accented by walnut open shelving in the new kitchen. The pendants are by Visual Comfort.
The kitchen counters are a glazed lava stone that is incredibly durable and antimicrobial from Pyrolab. "The glazes can be so saturated, and making it dark gray felt really clean and bright in this room," Flam says. "We used a simple tile as the backsplash, a hand-made zinc island, and unearthed beautiful, cobalt blue tile around the fireplace," she says. The rest of the fireplace is finished with green-and-blue Moroccan tile and pendants from an old Czech factory.
For the kitchen, Fogarty went with a very unique material and used zinc for the island. "It's an old-fashioned material used in many old kitchens that is slightly soft," he says. "You can cut on it, and it rubs away and becomes part of the patina."
Another view of the kitchen showing the large window with stained glass clerestory windows. The sunny space overlooks the backyard.
Located at the back of the home, an updated kitchen offers modern cabinetry finished in dark, fumed oak with patinated brass inlay. Contrasting with the wood tones is Calacutta Paonazzo marble along the countertops and backsplash.
When architect Nick Martin was hired to rework an art curator’s Hamptons property into a Zen-like getaway from the big city, he took an appropriately holistic view. It’s the beach house that’s got it all: green technology; passive solar design; rich materials; an expansive feeling, despite a petite half-acre corner lot; and a design concept that references its humble beginnings as an off-the-rack kit house.

The modern kitchen is the heart of the home. Cooking and conversing go hand-in-hand as meals are created, memories made. Whether teaching an old family recipe, reading the newspaper in a breakfast nook, or chatting over the daily morning coffee, the ritual of the everyday begins here. Spark your imagination by browsing our collection of modern kitchens. From popular counter materials like marble, granite, quartz, and wood; to stunning examples of white cabinets; to flooring options like hardwood and concrete, these projects showcase it all. You'll also find ideas for backsplashes, lighting, appliances, and sinks.