494 Kitchen Cooktops Ceiling Lighting Design Photos And Ideas

Garcia specified display space, complete with a shelf, behind the Murphy bed, so that it “creates a moment” when the bed is folded down, the architect says.
Garcia says people often comment that the ADU just needs a refrigerator and dishwasher, not realizing that both are seamlessly concealed in the cabinetry. “It’s actually a fully-functioning kitchen,” says Garcia, including a 15-inch WOLF cooktop, a TK dishwasher drawer, and TK refrigerator drawer. The counter is Caesarstone.
The open-plan kitchen is finished with wood cabinetry, a bright white tile backsplash, and concrete flooring.
The kitchen features organic materials, such as wood and leather, with a matte-white quartz counter. "We wanted the space to feel uniquely warm and lived-in while achieving some modern aesthetic," says Tarah.
The living spaces and back bedroom feature Kahrs’ Oak Johan wood flooring.
The kitchen is outfitted with two solid French walnut counters, a refrigerator, a gas stove with an oven and four burners, a sink, and plenty of cabinetry that's painted a mint green tone.
The kitchen island features an elegant concrete top in a light tone that complements the white oak joinery and allows the Carrera marble backsplash to steal the show.
The kitchen has a large central island, with the range and workspaces on the right and a huge built-in on the left in front of the stair. A bright, white laminate wall holds the oven and refrigerator. Architect Nicholas Fiore says this element “pumps the brakes a bit” on the white oak shiplap walls and white oak ceiling.
Flat-front maple cabinetry and a soapstone counter keep the kitchen backdrop simple.
White plasterboard walls and white kitchen cabinetry maintain a simple palette for the home, letting the views take center stage.
The modest U-shaped kitchen has an open peninsula on one side.
The kitchen was relocated to give the living area more breathing room. A slat detail above the beams bring attention to the preserved roof structure.
In California's idyllic Sea Ranch community, a vacation home privileges views of the Pacific Ocean and fog-shrouded trees. The bright and airy interiors, following a crisp, Scandinavian aesthetic, are pared back to retain focus on the spectacular surroundings.
Quartz floating shelves are a light and airy departure from the typical wood floating shelf.
The heavy hitters in the kitchen budget were the cabinetry, quartz counters, and a suite of appliances, including a refrigerator, wall oven/microwave unit, induction range, and dishwasher for $10,000.
The kitchen island is nine-and-a-half feet long, made possible by knocking down non-load-bearing walls and enlarging the room’s footprint. The island is “much larger than what most people would do in that space, because it's not that large of a space, but knocking down those walls and going with a large island makes the kitchen feel a lot more grand,” says Devlin.
A wine refrigerator and wet bar with the same finishes as the kitchen for cohesion brings more function for entertaining. “We use it more than we've ever used it before,” says Shawn. “It is no longer a dumping ground.”
Construction pausing during the pandemic turned out to be a boon: Living in the half-finished space, the couple realized they needed to open up the pass-through to the rest of the house for even more circulation.
A niche was built out for the wall ovens and a coffee counter.
Shawn, who runs Von Walter + Funk, a lifestyle boutique and event creative company, made the pendant lights over the island.
Mouser Cabinetry’s textured laminate flat-front doors were used throughout. The slim, black hardware is Europa by Top Knobs.
The couple chose Thermador appliances from Don’s Appliances. The black Nero Marquina marble counters are in a high honed finish, which kept them from becoming too gray in the finish process.
The Backed Utility Stool from Schoolhouse Electric in Sergeant Green now lines the island, offering a designated spot for guests to hang out while Jamie cooks.
A dramatic white oak panel wall reaches up to the new vaulted ceilings. There’s a concealed pantry to the right of the refrigerator.
A thick, poured concrete slab forms the surface of the large island and waterfalls to the floor on one side.
The backsplash and counters are Caesarstone, and a floating white oak shelf was positioned flush with the hood vent for a cleaner look.
The pair borrowed a little space on the front porch and expanded the kitchen into the breakfast nook, so the sink now looks out on the front yard and old olive tree.
"We made a number of low-design-impact improvements to the existing part of the house as the contractors found some alarming errors in previous remodels," reveals Davis. "The house now feels ready for the next century."
The cabinetry in the kitchen is rift-sawn, dark-stained white oak that complements the ceilings and contrasts with the white walls. The dark-pigmented concrete floors were intentionally left untreated in order to convey a sense of time. “As the home ages, the floor ‘records’ the construction process, foot traffic, wine spilled at birthday parties, drips of olive oil from anniversary dinners, watermarks from relaxing showers, and so on,” says architect Hunter Gundersen. “Every action will be subtly set in stone before it’s quickly cleaned up or swept away. Over the years, a patina of life will build up, adding depth and beauty to the interior.”
Ceilings that are over 10 feet tall provide a feeling of airiness for the tiny home.
A sizable primary bedroom and a sleeping loft above a bathroom flank the kitchen area.
The interior of the tiny home, which features a sleeping loft above the living room, is finished with vinyl flooring and white pine walls.
The custom cabinetry with pronounced wood grain is one of the materials chosen for its haptic qualities.
The micro home movement paints a rosy picture of financial freedom, simplicity, and self-determination—but going small comes with its own set of challenges.
Road-Haus features thoughtfully crafted details throughout, such as the leather pulls on the kitchen cabinetry.
The cozy living space features a fireplace with a mantel that doubles as a shelf or coffee table. There is the option of either an electric fireplace or a more expensive gas fireplace.
Early in the design process, Diane had considered a dropped ceiling over the kitchen to distinguish it from the living/dining area. “Our builder Trevor said he liked the feel of the interior space and advised against it,” reveals Diane. “We’re so glad he did!” He also made other small suggestions, including the stepped trim around the door frames. A piece of the original boxcar was salvaged by Diane’s son and daughter-in-law and turned into a key rack hanging by the main door.
“We learned that in a home this size, every design decision needs to contribute both functionally and aesthetically to the space,” Robinson says. “The details matter even more when every inch is significant, so we got creative with how to make the most out of everything.” Polished quartzite countertops, Leicht cabinetry, and a backsplash of back-painted glass make the kitchen feel luxurious.
Rather than wasting precious square-footage on a utility room, the mechanics for the cabin (an on-demand water heat and a two-stage water filter) are housed in two of the kitchenette’s wall cabinets. For cooking, there’s a two-burner induction stove and full-size sink. Most of the cooking is done outside on the grill.
Low-VOC, zero-formaldehyde white plywood cabinets, a subway-tile backsplash, and stone counters run through the kitchen.
The kitchen and dining area opens out to a narrow balcony that overlooks the internal courtyard and has views over the bay. The DC09 dining chairs are by Inoda + Sveje for Miyazaki Chair Company, and sourced from Great Dane Furniture.
The light in the kitchen is Supernova by Delta. “We explored the historical idea of how traditional native dwellings had a fire at the centre of the house around which everything gathers,” says architect Trevor Wallace. “The idea of an ‘oculus’ came from this and we thought it would be fun to play off that and provide this oculus-like light that is effectively the centre point of gathering within the home.”
The large kitchen is a space for the family to gather, with a stone-look porcelain benchtop and splashback from Stone Tile. “The clients wanted the stone in the kitchen to feel natural rather than dramatic,” says architect Trevor Wallace. “It's large format porcelain, though, as I don’t think they would have been able to handle the level of patina that would have developed on a natural stone when cooking with children!”
The kitchen opens out into the dining room and living area, and features an island countertop from Caesarstone. The lighting throughout is from Liteline.
An assortment of vintage glassware fills the open shelves, as well as ceramics from Don Corleon picked up on a trip to Italy.
The quirky tiled kitchen holds much of its original charm and is Natalie’s favorite room. The rug is the Schumacher Charlap Hyman & Herrero Caiman Alligator rug from Chairish.
Slim-lined shelves highlight the wood backdrop. Cabinet hardware was custom powder-coated to match the cabinet color.
The angles of the kitchen island mimic the fireplace detail. There’s a door to a walk-in pantry concealed in the cabinetry.
Ebonized oak cabinetry anchors the kitchen. Smoked mirror forms the backsplash, "to reflect the view even when you're turned away from it," says Megowan.
A mirrored backsplash reflects the garden. Spotted Gum cabinetry meets floors of the same material for uninterrupted flow. The counters are stainless steel.
Integrated appliances avoid clutter in the petite galley layout.
The timber used in the scaffolding and off-cuts from the framing were kept and redeployed for furniture and accents on the walls—such as the timber block in the primary kitchen.
The kitchen island features a top made from concrete and rimu, a native New Zealand timber. As rimu is no longer harvested, the piece was pulled from a swamp and is potentially around 1,000 years old. The split between the concrete and timber reflects the split between the flooring materials. “The faceted form of the island ties into our concept and links to the fractured forms on the exterior of the house,” says Craig.

The modern kitchen is the heart of the home. Cooking and conversing go hand-in-hand as meals are created, memories made. Whether teaching an old family recipe, reading the newspaper in a breakfast nook, or chatting over the daily morning coffee, the ritual of the everyday begins here. Spark your imagination by browsing our collection of modern kitchens. From popular counter materials like marble, granite, quartz, and wood; to stunning examples of white cabinets; to flooring options like hardwood and concrete, these projects showcase it all. You'll also find ideas for backsplashes, lighting, appliances, and sinks.