The Best Photos of Modern Homes, Bathrooms, Kitchens, and More

North Elevation
The entire house is marked by dramatic changes in color: Though the walls are white, the floors and ceiling swap tones, and pink fluorescent lights give way to a lavender bedroom ceiling. The domestic spectrum culminates in the orange floor and curtains of the rooftop penthouse—–proving that even diamond-plate steel and ventilation ducts, given some Safecoat paint, can be made as colorful and warm as a kindergarten.
A garden path in the backyard was paved with discarded marble windowsills and stone doorframes. This reuse of ruins adds texture to the landscape.
Lawrence relaxes in the master bedroom with a hand-rolled cigarette. The room 

has a lavender ceiling (Alice was told it’s the best color to see when waking).
The Weiners sit in one of the many large window bays, showing how the reused truck bodies look from within.
Pieces from Lawrence’s voluminous archive act like unintentional architectural ornaments, bringing color and humanity to the often Spartan LOT-EK design.
Lawrence and Alice confer in the ground-floor kitchen. Traces of color are visible everywhere, including the orange-and-yellow curtains and pink coathooks.
A collection of objects from Lawrence’s desk include stencils, paint rags, glasses, and a notebook.
The back garden includes fragments of stone from the earlier building.
Lawrence Weiner sits at his daylit desk. The bare walls are perfect for tacking 

up new projects, and the steel ductwork gives the space an industrious feel.
It feeds their backyard garden, which also features permeable paving rocks, a composting  bin, and a surrounding fence made  of knotty Western red cedar.
A Vitsœ shelving system and a  collection of bamboo baskets made in Vietnam occupy a sunny corner in the office that Lauren and Keith share on the top floor.
“Everything in the bedroom is built in, including the bed,” adds Keith, who commissioned Hub Woodworks to mill this key feature. Andrew Neyer Crane lights flank the bed, an Akari pendant by Isamu Noguchi hangs overhead, and a Womb chair by Eero Saarinen for Knoll, covered in Cassia fabric from Designers Guild, sits in the corner.
One of the boldest moves was the glass-encased shower inside the revamped master bedroom. “Obviously, building that shower was not a cost-saving option,” says Keith, “but we used green slate, which is not super expensive, either.” The Architec sinks are from Duravit.
“In an eighteen-foot-wide brownstone, there’s only so much you can do. But we wanted  it to feel fresh,” Keith Burns, architect and resident
The console is vintage Florence Knoll.
The furnishings reflect an eclectic mix of old and new. In a second-floor guest room, a bedside table by Fort Standard holds a vintage lamp.
On the second-floor landing, an Alvar Aalto A110 pendant light from Artek hangs above an improvised green space.
The first floor holds the living room, which includes a Morsø 3440 wood-burning stove and a pair of Mags sofas by HAY.
“We put a lot of energy—and at least half our investment—into the bones of the building because we intend to be here for a long time,” says Lauren Snyder, who resuscitated an aging home alongside her husband, architect Keith Burns.
At the heart of the rejuvenated duplex is a monolithic “wedge core,” which houses a common stairwell
The duplex’s lower level, formerly a railroad apartment, was conjoined with its neighbor and reconfigured to meet the rooftop addition.
From below, the volumes seem to cascade down the hillside. Windows light up in a dramatic pattern at night, a sharp contrast to their subtle shapes during the day.
From the grass roof patios, the house disappears almost completely, leaving only the landscape, water, and occasional passing orca.
A small stepping transition from the entryway marks the boundary of the kitchen, which flows seamlessly into the dining and living areas for an airy, comfortable space.
Oversized sliding glass doors at the end of each volume form window walls directed at specific views, while clusters of smaller horizontal lites let in natural light and glimpses of the surrounding landscape.
Viewed from the hill above, the structure rises to peer out over the water while firmly anchored back to the ground.
As they follow the slope, each volume shifts slightly to capture different frames of the surrounding water and mountains. Large sliding glass doors provide access to both these expansive views and to green roof patios.
The culmination of the collaboration was the design’s simplicity: a single neutral, durable, versatile volume that can easily host a changing collection of hobbies, art, furniture, and guests.
The floor is polished concrete, chosen for its durability, low-cost, and minimal maintenance. The red fiberglass armchair is from Modernica.
The coffee table, red Memorex video ball TV, and red Mercer candlestick phone are all thrift store finds. The ceiling fan from Modern Fan Company is contemporary, but matches the retro aesthetic.
The single main room features ample glazing to provide natural light for cultivation of artistic endeavors. In the words of Witt, the “studio is the anchor for the backyard."
Working with a limited budget, First Lamp designed and built one principle architectural flourish: exposed Douglas fir rafters that would weather to a brighter red over the years and accent the white siding.
The studio occupies the corner of a backyard filled with carefully-tended plants. They positioned the studio at the yard’s far corner, diagonal from the main house’s back door, to create a path through the garden that would engage visitors in landscape.
A wood floor uncovered during demolition delineates the private quarters.
Hernán and Lucia were captivated by the flowering wall across the courtyard; they continued the green theme on their patio
On warm days, when the glass wall is open, meals in the kitchen have an alfresco feel. The dining table is by Boulevard Furniture and the chairs are by Alejandro Sticotti for Net Muebles.
A box sheathed  in the same material acts as a divider and holds the bathroom.
Demolition exposed a high, wood-beamed ceiling, which added “cubic meters of air” to the apartment, says Hernán. The bedroom is furnished with custom pieces made of Paraiso wood.
A sleek version of the traditional  parrilla, or grill, handcrafted  by Oficios Asociados, has pride  of place on the patio counter.
In the living area, their dog, Rocknrol, hangs out on a suede Copenhagen sofa by Alejandro Sticotti for Net Muebles.