66 Exterior Wood Siding Material Stone Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

The expansive property contains an extensive forest and trail system.
The home is naturally integrated into its bucolic setting.
The northern façade of the main house is set at an angle to the barn
The design of the 3890-square-foot main residence and its adjacent barn have been executed with the highest degree of craftsmanship and attention to detail, drawing from traditional influences and the vernacular of the rural northeast.
Atelier Andy Carson has created a robust family home that actively explores the relationship between building and landscape.
The home was designed to cantilever out towards specific framed views of its spectacular surroundings.
The funnel-like protrusion cantilevers over the hillside and is supported by angled pillars.
Horizontal slabs of bluestone and vertical hardwood slats on the exterior of the house.
The client, Beau Neilson (daughter of Australian art patrons Judith & Kerr Neilson) and her husband, Jeffrey Simpson were looking for an elegant and comfortable residence and their brief displayed a clear understanding of lifestyle, architecture, and design.
The house is positioned on top of a hill on a 150-acre site where a ridge connects the Illawarra escarpment to the sea. From its elevated position, it looks down towards Werri Beach and Geering Bay.
The home is composed of limestone masonry and structural steel accents.
Arriving at The French Laundry, guests now begin their experience through a sequence of new garden spaces.
The client can enjoy the outdoors day or night via the screened porch and deck.
According to the architects, the screened porch panels (on the left) were site-built by the contractor to have similar dimensions as the Marvin windows (to the right). Dramatic black sashes unite the facade. Thin mull covers between window units blend with the exterior siding, "which afforded a consistency that we were after," said Wiedemann. Native stone on the foundation is similar to old Virginia farmhouses.
The exterior form and materials of the house echo historic farmhouses in the area, while the garage, clad in red board and batten, evokes old barns. Wiedemann reinterprets the function of a traditional cupola here, which was typically used to aid interior ventilation, by inserting a whole-house fan in this one.
Tremblay chose materials that would reflect the natural setting, like the Polylam-C cedar siding from Prorez, used at the home’s entrance. The exterior floor finish is Montauk grey slate.
The home’s location in Sterzing, Italy meant that it was surrounded by a rural green landscape, and the architects sought to change it as little as possible.
By reversing the positioning of the gabled roof form, and presenting and empty gabled space within the monolithic cube, he could create a parody of a “house” within the negative space.
To integrate the former postman’s cottage with the new design, architect David Sheppard added a concrete column adjacent to an existing stone chimney and a new slate chimney “at the heart of the composition.” From this, the roof structure fans out; the small structure now serves as an anteroom.
The end gable of the house is covered in local sandstone.
The reddish tones of the sandstone are from iron oxide deposits in the local stone.
The Nook by Hall + Bednarczyk Architects
The other facades have wood panels as well as the local red sandstone.
Combining a prefab steel super-structure with concrete walls and insulated metal panels, Anthrazit House in Santa Barbara was designed by architects Pamela and Hector Magnus and built in collaboration with EcoSteel.
Street Entrance
The viewing deck wraps around the home to provide views in every direction.
The two-foot-thick stacked stone walls constructed by Reed Hilderbrand nod to the masonry-free walls common in Revolutionary-era New England.
Front
Front

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.

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