39 Exterior Wood Siding Material Metal Siding Material Gable Roofline Glass Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

The cabin decks all face either expansive views of the ocean or the magical forest of fir trees.
Saltwater Farm is situated on the shoreline of San Juan Island, which is only accessible via sea or air.
The RAD LAB team thoughtfully placed each cabin amongst the pines to ensure quality views and a secluded experience for guests.
One of the driving principles behind the design of Saltwater Farm was to have minimal impact on the site, so the cabins sit above the uneven landscape on stilts.
Both the main house and the cabins were designed to bring the outside in, celebrating a connection with the surrounding forest. The expansive deck on the main house almost doubles the usable square footage, blurring the barrier between the interior and exterior.
The clients—Dr. Merriss Waters, a veterinarian, and Dr. Andrew Fleming, a clinical child psychologist—had a lifelong dream to live in a pristine, pastoral setting in the Pacific Northwest. “They live an active lifestyle and enjoy exploring the islands,” says architect Taylor Bode. “Their hobbies include mountain biking, trail running, farming, and cooking for friends and family.”  In addition to an event space in an existing barn and cabin rentals, Saltwater Farm is home to productive gardens and a variety of animals.
Five cabins are located in the pine forest surrounding the main house. “The design for both the main house and cabins at Saltwater Farm resulted from studying traditional Pacific Northwest cabins and refining that vernacular language with one of Scandinavian minimalism,” says designer Taylor Bode.
Saltwater Farm is located just outside the small town of Friday Harbor, which has a population of less than 2,500. “San Juan Island has a beautiful valley populated with farms, and it’s supported by a tourism- and agriculture-driven economy,” says designer Taylor Bode. “It was seen by Andrew and Merriss as the perfect place to bring their farm vision to life.”
Both ÖÖD Iceland houses have a hot tub at the front overlooking the spectacular scenery. “This makes the experience even more surreal,” says CEO Andreas Tiik.
The glass front half of the cabin blurs boundaries between interior and exterior and completely immerses guests in the dramatic surroundings.
The cabins overlook the Hekla volcano, one of Iceland’s most active volcanoes. It is part of a 25-mile-long volcanic ridge, and during the Middle Ages it was referred to by Europeans as the "Gateway to Hell.”
The two cabins are named Freya and Alva, and feature the runes for “F” and “A” on the exterior timber wall. Signs from Nordic mythology are also found on the back of the houses. “The viking elements and the runes help the cabins fit into Icelandic history,” says CEO Andreas Tiik.
The harsh local climate—including strong winds and acid rain caused by the volcanic landscape—was a particular challenge. The cabin features a copper roof, which is one of the few materials that can cope with acid rain.
Two cabins sit in the vast, empty landscape overlooking the Hekla volcano, around three hours’ drive from Reykjavík. The front part of each cabin—for sleeping—is almost entirely glass, while the rear—where the living, kitchen and bathroom spaces are located—is clad in timber for privacy.
A seamless deck at the central level extends the living areas. The house is orientated directly to the east to maximize daylighting and views.
The home is elevated above a carport, which can also be used as a covered semi-outdoor living space in the summer.
The dark blue facade is punctuated by a single cedar-clad wall that faces the deck and forms a timber nook that is protected from prevailing winds.
The majority of the house is clad in inky blue metal—a durable, low-maintenance material.
The Thornton House sits on a steep site in Brooklyn, Wellington, New Zealand, with a small footprint of just 50 square meters.
The external brick walls are part of the 1990 addition. The upper part had been rendered in acrylic and painted butter yellow. This was removed and the section was re-clad with a charred solid timber shiplap cladding. An enormous double-height window floods the living space with natural light.
Pinon Ranch appears to emerge from the dense oak grove.
The “knuckle” connects the public and private spaces with the meadow on one side and the oak grove on the other. The space between the volumes is as carefully considered as the architecture itself.
Cantilevered out over the hillside the residence, which also serves as the couple's primary residence, is threaded between the trees, anchored by its concrete foundation which stops just short of the tree’s roots.
The gabled structure peers out from the dense oak grove to the meadow below.
Fogged glass grants residents a city view while maintaining privacy from neighboring onlookers. Constructed from four larger pieces, timber and steel structure's walls are packed with coconut fiber insulation.
The home can be placed on any flat surface where there are connections to water and sewage. Apartment building roofs are an ideal fit, but finding complexes willing to host the structures may be a challenge, along with addressing access to roofs for those dwelling above.
Fresh, bright, and cheery, the updated architecturally significant residence complements the couple’s modern lifestyle.
Four bedrooms and four bathrooms span two structures, with a guest wing and main residence. The Aspen, Colorado, home is 4,300 square feet.
The program is pushed to the property edges to screen adjacent neighbors and directs framed views to a large central courtyard.
The Mono structure's single-engineered truss frame makes it capable of withstanding harsh weather—from heavy snow, to downpours, to heat. It also comes in three variations.
The architects reused and enlarged the steel frame and ground slab to preserve the shed’s original form while cladding the structure in new materials sympathetic to the rural vernacular.
Walls of glass run up the east and west sides of the house, blurring the boundary between indoors and out.
The sedum green roof by Skygarden helps to manage stormwater.
In order to maximize space, the architects utilized a split-level design that includes the living areas on the main level, two upstairs bedrooms, and a walk-out basement beneath the dining room. The wood siding was salvaged and restored from the previous building on-site, in order to bring warmth to the gray, seamed metal and reference the neighborhood's past.
The width of the greenhouse volume is equal to the width of the enclosed  volume. "The greenhouse portion and the residential portion are structurally independent while complementing each other's functions," says Snark architectural director Yu Yamada, "enabling expansion, reduction, and renewal of the greenhouse section in the future."
Stephen Waddell and Isabel Kunigk worked with architect D’Arcy Jones to breathe new life into their “dank old” structure. The couple chose to sacrifice square footage inside in order to make the most of outdoor space.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.