625 Exterior Wood Siding Material Metal Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas - Page 2

The large front window serves to frame the landscape. It can be also completely closed with “mega wooden shutters.”
The facade was made by local craftsmen, and all of the shutters are custom made.
The home’s wood-paneled exterior is outlined in black to make it stand out against the changing colors of the seasons.
Most of the year, the family keep the sliding glass doors—which span 16 feet from the living room to the exterior deck—of their Tampa dwelling open, giving it the aura of a Sarasota Modern home. Stunning cantilevered overhangs, in the spirit of Paul Rudolph's Umbrella House, help tame the sun.
An exercise in simplicity, the Sonoma weeHouse consists of two steel-framed volumes with ipe interiors, oiled oak cabinetry, and massive sliding glass walls that overlook valley views.
The green roof is planted with local succulents, including cascading pigface.
A Cor-Ten steel "sleeping volume" seemingly floats atop a predominantly glass "living volume." Intersecting these two stacked volumes is a double-height, timber box which houses the multipurpose spaces.
At Under, a Snøhetta-designed restaurant balanced on the Norwegian coast, guests dine 16 feet below the ocean’s surface. The tilted concrete tube gives the impression that it’s sliding into the sea. “The idea was to make a tube that would bring people from above sea level down under the sea,” lead architect Rune Grasdal told Dezeen. “That transition is easy to understand, but it’s also the most effective way to do it. It also feels secure, but you don’t feel trapped.” The angle was also designed with the building’s aquatic neighbors in mind. Over time the structure will become part of its environment, acting as an artificial reef. Marine research tools like cameras have been installed outside the restaurant to help scientists learn about the population, behavior, and diversity of the species living in this part of the North Atlantic.
Bundeena Beach House connects the street and wider community to the water views beyond thanks to its low-lying form and a native roof garden, which the architect describes as a "green infinity edge."
Embedded in the side of a valley in New Zealand’s Southern Alps, facing out over pristine Lake Wanaka, stands a new home meant to look as though it is part of the land around it. "It resembles the large schist rocks you see all over this region that are half-buried in the hillside and poke out at strange angles," says Andrew Simpson of WireDog Architecture, the Wellington-based firm that designed it.
If you've never set foot within a shipping container home, you might imagine them to be simple rectangles with no real consideration put into design, proportion, and the division of rooms. Well, think again: these floor plans prove that shipping container homes can be efficient, sustainable, and even exciting.
Large timber-framed glass sliding doors open the kitchen/dining space to the rear courtyard on two sides.
Designed and built by Oakland–based O2 Treehouse, the Pinecone is a five-and-a-half-ton geodesic home that can be installed in the forest or in your own backyard. The treehouse, accessed via a wood ladder and a trap door, is constructed from steel, wood, and glass that integrates into the forest canopy. Inside, 64 diamond-shaped windows provide 360-degree views of the surrounding forest or landscape. Even the floors are composed of transparent panels—enhancing the sensation of floating above the earth.
This one-bedroom NODE prefab slots perfectly into a Seattle backyard and produces all of its own energy—with enough leftover to power the neighboring house.
In addition to the workshop, the ground level holds an outdoor shower with easy beach access, a beach equipment storage closet, and a seasonal half bath.
RES4’s modular approach provides a Brooklyn family with a beautiful weatherproof retreat on Long Island. Designed as a hybrid between a double-wide and a courtyard house, the 1,650-square-foot North Fork Bay House was prefabricated off-site as two modules. In addition to time and cost savings, prefabrication helped address the restricted building site, which has a very long and narrow footprint limited by FEMA setback regulations and zoning laws.
Rudolph used red cannonballs as weights to hold the home’s signature wood shutters in place.
The external brick walls are part of the 1990 addition. The upper part had been rendered in acrylic and painted butter yellow. This was removed and the section was re-clad with a charred solid timber shiplap cladding. An enormous double-height window floods the living space with natural light.
For architect Stephen Chung, the design of his Wayland, Massachusetts, home was all about blending into the natural environment. The first floor is a serene composition of white and wood. The demand for a domestic office space inspired him to build up, adding a second floor for him to "experiment." In a departure from the Cape Cod aesthetic that rules his block, he was able to give the addition a modernist take, while also literally reflecting the existing landscape of the neighborhood. The entire 1,100-square-foot adjunct that encompasses his second story office-studio, master suite, and fort for his two young sons is swathed in mirrored siding and plate-glass windows.
Front facade
Hunkered down during a week-long snow storm, three couples hatch a plan to build purposefully designed and expertly crafted tiny homes under the moniker Tiny Heirloom.
Affordable, adorable, and in many cases, transportable, these tiny homes made a big impact on our readers this year.
The ranch-style Casita 850 by MA Modular houses two bedrooms and one bathroom in a finely laid out 850 square feet.
The two-story addition as seen from the back. A green roof provides extra gardening space for the family, who loves to be connected to their neighborhood.
The untreated wood will develop a silvery gray patina over time.
The shutters can be opened to allow views and cross breezes through the building.
At the north facade, a series of lapocho wood shutters mitigate solar heat gain in the summer.
The guest houses were prefabricated in a factory, trucked onto the site, and then set on concrete foundations.
The independent modular guest houses give the client the flexibility to expand in the future.
Untreated Lapacho timber planks—the same material used on the main house—clad the exterior of the two guest homes. In contrast to the horizontal cladding of the main house, the planks are vertically oriented here.
Located in the countryside in southern Uruguay, the prefabs overlook a gentle rolling landscape with eucalyptus trees, farm animals, and mountains in the far distance. The owners also have many domestic birds—including swans, peacocks, and ducks that freely roam the site.
Taula House by M Gooden Design  |  Exterior // Library
The owners of Kew East House, a triple-story, 2,853-square-foot home in the Melbourne suburb from which it gets its name, are a couple with two teenagers who sought to maximize their wonderful, parkland views and add an internal "granny flat" on the ground floor.
Honomobo is also behind the Honomobar, a 100-square-foot mobile bar built from a recycled shipping container.
Built in 1949, this Lustron house in Minneapolis is one of six such steel prefabs on Nicollet Avenue.
The concrete foundation was poured on top of a rock outcropping, so that the house would feel like part of the natural features of the site.
One of the client’s goals was a low-maintenance home—so there are no gutters or skylights to clean. The angles of the exterior metal envelope allow forest debris and muck to slide off easier. “The house looks after itself in a way,” says senior designer Czarina Ray.
The firm juxtaposed a standing-seam metal envelope with thin strips of cedar on the exterior. “We're playing with the textures on the outside of the house,” says Campos, pointing out that the cedar brings a “human scale” to the industrial nature of the metal.
Sooke House 01 is located on a multiacre lot on the southern tip of Vancouver Island in British Columbia, surrounded by Douglas fir, Sitka spruce, and cedar trees. At the entry, Campos Studio split the roofline to accommodate an existing tree.
Add/Subtract House by Matt Fajkus Architecture | Photo by Charles Davis Smith
Add/Subtract House by Matt Fajkus Architecture | Photo by Charles Davis Smith
Add/Subtract House by Matt Fajkus Architecture | Photo by Charles Davis Smith
Add/Subtract House by Matt Fajkus Architecture | Photo by Charles Davis Smith
Warm, natural cedar is used for the siding, railings, outdoor shower enclosure, and brise-soleil.
Elevated into the trees, the open-plan living area opens up to nature via outdoor decks on either side.
The architects strategically placed the home just north of its neighbors for greater privacy. Set on a very long and narrow site, the home enjoys direct access to Great Peconic Bay with clear views of the water.
At first glance, the structure appears to be a single-story home. The surrounding trees create additional privacy as the yard begins to slope toward the rear.
Ojochal, one of a trio of villages that make up the Costa Ballena in Costa Rica, is located at the edge of a tropical rainforest. The village is known for its laid-back vibe and excellent cuisine, with a multicultural expat population.
A view of The Resonant Dwelling by Schemata Studio at dusk. The stairs to the residence on the top floor are silhouetted behind an open rain screen facade.
A custom 1,527-square-foot FabCab with an attached garage built in Cle Elum, Washington.
From the front, Greg Hoffman and Kirsten Brady’s home in Portland, Oregon, bears little resemblance to the daylight ranch house that once stood in its place. Yet upon closer inspection, it is clear that the enlarged structure is actually an updated version of the same dwelling that has occupied the site since the early 1950s. More windows, a trellised roofline, a basalt privacy wall, and a flat-roofed, top-floor addition are among the most striking changes. Plantings were also added to enhance the yard. “There was zero landscaping,” says Greg, “If you look at the original photos, the house was just sitting on the ground.” All of the new features are carefully oriented so that the sightline from the street through the house to the vista beyond remains open. “The original house had a gap in the hedge so people could see the view,” Greg recalls. “We said, ‘Let’s keep that.’”
Pinon Ranch appears to emerge from the dense oak grove.
The “knuckle” connects the public and private spaces with the meadow on one side and the oak grove on the other. The space between the volumes is as carefully considered as the architecture itself.
Cantilevered out over the hillside the residence, which also serves as the couple's primary residence, is threaded between the trees, anchored by its concrete foundation which stops just short of the tree’s roots.
The gabled structure peers out from the dense oak grove to the meadow below.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.