180 Exterior Wood Siding Material Gable Roofline Cabin Design Photos And Ideas

The home was built in 1980, Stelle Lomont Rouhani Architects renovated the project in 2013.
Gas fire pit
Ohia forest setting
The angular cabins overlook breathtaking forest vistas.
To reduce the load of the trees and minimize the building's impact on the forest, 12 columns support the cabin. One tree stretches up through the net, emphasizing the connection to the outdoors.
The motto for the Panorama Glass Lodge states "Where the sky is," which works as a fitting descriptor for the design of this cozy 248-square-foot vacation cabin. Thanks to the glass panels that wrap around a strategically placed bed, the bright dancing lights of the aurora can be viewed from the most comfortable spot.
Designed by the Canadian firm Pelletier de Fontenay in collaboration with architect François Abbott, the residence is located in the rural town of Hartley in Quebec, Canada.
The gable roofs and the overall shape of the buildings are reminiscent of the vernacular architecture: barns, farms, and sheds.
The home is located on a plateau in the area's rolling, hilly landscape.
The three volumes house the three wings of the home: a communal area with a kitchen, dining, and living area; a master suite; and a guest suite.
"We did our best to tuck the buildings into the site—the goal was to get up high on a perch. It was a matter of setting that elevation and working back down with the topography," says architectural designer Riley Pratt.
Sleeping Cabin at sunset.
Sleeping Cabin at dawn.
Sleeping Cabin from southeast lawn and existing storage shed beyond.
The exterior walls of Casa Quinta da Tília are painted the same color as the tin roof finishing, which is made from local Japanese cedar wood. The broad skylights in architect Pedro Maurício Borges's design not only draw in the wonderful Azores sunshine, but also frame the majestic, parasol-like crown of the linden tree.
The exterior combines recycled brick, radial sawn timber, and galvanized roof sheeting. "Materials were selected to meet the clients’ brief that the house fit within the cognitive idea of an old shed," explain the architects.
The father of architect Greg Dutton wished to build a cabin on the family farm, located within Appalachian Ohio and home to 400 heads of cattle. Dutton, of Pittsburgh and Columbus, Ohio-based Midland Architecture, presented this design as his father’s birthday present in 2012. Finished in 2014, the 900-square-foot cabin operates entirely off-the-grid.
The angled pine paneling set against the black cabin body creates a strong geometric form.
The cabin is positioned to take full advantage of the region's spectacular views.
The roof also protects the "eyes" of the cabin in the front.
The ore pine roof prevents rain from dribbling down the cabin's "neck," where the main entrance is.
A mix of black and natural pine, the cabin is perfectly integrated into its surroundings.
The "hooded" roof, originally designed as a protective feature against the risk of avalanches, shields the front and rear facades.
The commission was for a robust and efficient little cabin oriented towards the lake.
The simple design and remote-yet-close location of Elsewhere Retreat's cabins make it perfect for a weekend getaway.
Architects Joan Soranno and John Cook of HGA developed five site-specific cabins that tread lightly on the land at Marlboro College in rural Vermont. These deceptively simple structures update the regional vernacular. Every year, Marlboro College hosts the Marlboro Music Festival in which classical musicians join together to hone their craft.  These cabins help support the musicians that live, work, and rehearse together.
Tru Form Tiny merged two of their standard models and then further customized the exterior with paneling and tight knot cedar. They also added Galvalume roofing and a removable awning.
"All our products are conceived for a 'zero impact dwelling,'" says Torino, Italy-based Leap Company. "[The mountains] make the best setting to test our products and to find winning solutions to build and live in every place."
Iniö has a high-ceilinged terrace, and is fitted with generous floor-to-ceiling windows in the living room and dining area that bring in plenty of natural light.
Kapoho by Teak Bali Hardwood Homes is comprised of three structures that are connected by a large wrap-around deck. The walls are finished in mango wood.
The back of the volume acts as a wall that separates the living spaces from the sculpture studio.
Designed by OFIS Arhitekti, the Kanin Winter Cabin is a compact wooden volume with three platforms extending out over the valley. A large, glazed panoramic window provides breathtaking views of the surrounding Kanin Mountains.
The smallest DublDom model, the DD 26, is a compact, 280-square-foot studio with a cozy bathroom with heated floors.
In Texas, where everything is bigger, Ryan McLaughlin is placing his bets on something small. Specifically, a simple 160-square-foot cabin that he hopes city-dwellers will book to get away, find some focus, and reconnect with nature. The result is a laidback, pitched-roof cabin in which every inch of space is thoughtfully allotted so that guests can spend the maximum amount of time outdoors. "Most tiny homes you see essentially replicate a normal house and downsize everything," says Ryan. "We wanted to work our way from the inside out."
Innauer Matt Architekten designed the house as simple wooden building resting atop a solid, reinforced concrete plinth.
Remotely tucked away in an alpine meadow in South Tyrol, Zallinger was once a historic Alpine village that has been reincarnated as a boutique hotel.
Zallinger is located on the ski slopes of the Alpe di Siusi mountain range, and it opens up its restaurant and lounge to visiting skiers.
Ryan McLaughlin watches the sunset from the deck of the 160-square-foot tiny home he built, with no prior experience, at his parents’ horse ranch in Georgetown, Texas. Soon, the trailer-mounted cabin will be moved to a vineyard, where it will operate grid-free and be available to rent for short stays.
With prices starting in the low five figures, pretreated shou sugi ban siding was out of the question. "My girlfriend and I spent a week cutting, trimming, burning, scrubbing, and oiling the cedar ourselves," says Ryan. The project cost a total of $550 in materials.
A fiberglass door covers a void in the wall that holds a solar-powered water heater, a propane tank, and wood for a fire bowl.
Elsewhere Cabin by Sean O'Neill
The entrance to the Orchid Tiny House.
They tiny house connects to the outdoors with clerestory windows, floor-to-ceiling windows, skylights, and a garage door that opens up an entire wall.
To protect against water penetration, the walls and roof are assembled with three-quarter inch pressure-treated OSB sheathing, Typar housewrap, an ice and water shield, asphalt paper, furring strips, and stained penofin cedar.
Planning regulations required a gable roof, which the architects split into four shed roofs carefully designed to respond to heavy snow shed and meet spatial and aesthetic wishes.
The exterior terrace, water channel, deck, and window wall of Matt and Jon Andersen-Miller's renovated midcentury home.
Enough House by MacKay-Lyons Sweetapple Architects resides on Brian MacKay Lyons' Shobac farm in Nova Scotia, a campus that allows the firm to experiment with form, materiality, and building. The Cor-Ten steel cabin, which features exposed Douglas fir plywood sheathing and stained pine flooring inside, houses an intern architect.
The base of this cabin is constructed out of cast-in-place concrete with formwork using the same wood as the floor cladding above.
Stairway to Heaven is located on the clients' parents' land, just steps away from the homeowner's childhood home. Two siblings were also building homes on the property, making it a true family compound. The architects were mindful to create a home that utilized the views, but also allowed for privacy between residents.
An extension of Treehotel’s mission of bringing modern design to a serene natural environment, the 7th room is a cabin lofted among the treetops that blurs the distinction between indoors and outdoors. Designed by the renowned firm Snøhetta, the structure hovers 10 meters above the ground with a black-and-white print of the canopy covering the bottom façade, creating a trompe l'oeil effect.
Oozing with charm, comfort, and modern amenities, these 10 micro homes are eagerly awaiting to help you experience the tiny house lifestyle. But brace yourself—you might become an aspiring tiny-house dweller after just one stay.
Weary city dwellers can find serenity in this array of cabins on the Norwegian archipelago of Fleinvær, where the Northern Lights make regular appearances.
Available for as low as $55,000, the Artist Bothy is a multipurpose, prefab hut designed to promote a creative spark in residents.
The Mono structure's single-engineered truss frame makes it capable of withstanding harsh weather—from heavy snow, to downpours, to heat. It also comes in three variations.
The natural slope of the site was perfect for dividing the house into split levels. The exterior is clad in heat-treated pine that has aged to a soft gray, which contrasts nicely with the charcoal bricks.
Dubldom presently offers five different models that range from 280-square-foot studios to 1,400-square-foot, three-bedroom dwellings that work well for families.
An architect and construction engineer couple build a sustainable, 624-square-foot abode for $221,580 in their Southeast Portland backyard.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.