1468 Exterior Wood Siding Material Flat Roofline Design Photos And Ideas

These prefab ADUs are the perfect solution for those in need of a separate home office.
Charred Siberian timber complements the original brick home.
A bridge connects the home’s two volumes, which are divided between private and public spaces. The private spaces are protected through a series of screens and shading devices, while the main public living spaces are fluidly open to the outdoors.
Approaching the home from above, guests encounter a green roof that feels united with the landscape beyond. The entry sequence presents purposefully framed views that hide and reveal the lake.
A two-story, timber volume holds the private areas while a one-story concrete pavilion is more social and communal. Large openings blend indoor and outdoor spaces while allowing coastal breezes to become part of the home environment.
A launch pad for the homeowner’s adventurous lifestyle, Wallis Lake House has an outdoor shower at the lower-level entry so Adam can rinse off before he steps inside.
A view of the parklike retreat from the backyard pool shows how the glass-enclosed entryway connects the living and sleeping areas.
"The use of materials, the careful details, the integrated sense of place, the weaving together of inside and out, and creating a special home that the clients love make this a special story for me," Epstein notes fondly.
As night falls, the home lights up like a lantern, enhancing the warm glow of the wood ceiling. Immense clerestory windows and glass sliders connect the home to the outdoors.
Built to commune with its scenic surroundings, this sustainable home embodies understated luxury.
The all-glass room provides views of the neighboring lake.
The long, low home sits unobtrusively atop the ridge. Large areas of glazing open the home to the landscape to the south.
An enclosed porch with a fireplace sits between the living wing and the services wing, providing a pivotal point from which the home fans out.
The simple, affordable material palette allows the home to sit comfortably within the natural landscape.
The home is oriented to take in views of Mount Canobolas in the Great Dividing Range. With an elevation of 4,577 feet, the extinct volcano is the highest mountain in the region.
Floor-to-ceiling glazing ensures natural light is plentiful throughout the home. The silvertop ash cladding on the exterior will develop a silver-gray patina over time.
The home is respectful to the rural site and champions the view. Thanks to the prefab construction, there was very little earthwork and minimal site impact. This approach also helped to eliminate potential weather delays—which would have been likely as, owing to the high altitude, the area frequently experiences frost and snow in winter months.
New wood cladding, dyed black, was fit to the house's original frame.
The herringbone pattern in the screen casts a play of shadows depending on the time of day.
The privacy screen is composed of timber battens painted black and mounted on a steel frame.
Tsai Design intervened with a rear extension that contrasts with the heritage front. Now, the owners can enjoy the deck off the lower-level workshop. Above that, a privacy screen conceals a second-floor deck off the new principal bedroom.
The 1,950-square-foot Koto LivingHome 2 (Piha) is organized around a central open-plan living space with a direct connection to the outdoors. The design is named after the two courtyards located on both sides of the home.
Wrapped in timber, the 1,016-square-foot Koto LivingHome 1 (Yksi) includes two bedrooms and a flex room on the first floor. The open-plan kitchen, dining, and living area is located on the floor above.
Koto and Plant Prefab will work directly with homeowners to determine optimal site placement and adhere to energy-saving passive solar principles.
Olympia Prairie Home exterior
Olympia Prairie Home exterior
Olympia Prairie Home exterior
Olympia Prairie Home entryway
Olympia Prairie Home entryway
Olympia Prairie Home exterior
Just a short walk away from two of Norway’s largest hospitals in Oslo resides a tranquil forest featuring the trickling Sognsvann Creek. It’s in this lush oasis that Norwegian architectural and design firm Snøhetta has built the Outdoor Care Retreat, associated with the Friluftssykehuset Foundation. The project allows nature to provide a healing respite for patients who’ve been kept in isolation. For that purpose, the interiors have been left relatively bare, in stark contrast to the crowded, tall hospital buildings they’re associated with.
Architects Melissa and Jacob Brillhart wanted a home that took advantage of a lush lot and minimized any impact on the landscape. Drawing on principles of tropical modernism and the dogtrot model, the couple designed and built a simple, practical structure that is rich in cultural meaning. "There is something to be said for living in a glass house totally surrounded by nature," says Melissa. "I can't put my finger on it, but it has an impact on how I feel. It just isn’t the same experience as living in a house with traditional punched openings."
A massive oak tree is the focal point of the communal entry courtyard. The apartments were originally designed by Harwell Hamilton Harris for Thomas Cranfill, an English
professor at The University of Texas at Austin courtyard.
Hoffman enjoys the deck she built on the house's front facade.
Hinged doors on the house's exterior fold open to reveal more storage space.
Mariah Hoffman stands in the doorway of the 156-square-foot home she designed and built for herself.
The architects nestled the home into a fold in the topography so that the western facade grips the land, and the eastern facade cantilevers over a small slope. <span style="font-family: Theinhardt, -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, &quot;Segoe UI&quot;, Roboto, Oxygen-Sans, Ubuntu, Cantarell, &quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;, sans-serif;">The house’s angled roofline mimics the wooded hillside behind it.</span>
The Goya House is broken down into a series of pavilions, including a separate master suite (seen at left) connected by a glass bridge.
The house's front door, tucked under one of many cantilevering portions of the roof, comes after passing through an interior courtyard. "It’s not just an axial arrival to the front door," says Wright. "You come in and shift to the right, and cross a small bridge over the entry water feature. Those little shifts [help] guide a visitor to see these different points of view."
Designed by Austin, Texas–based studio Andersson-Wise Architects, the 12,500-square-foot Stone Creek Camp is sited on a sloping hill whose topography guides visitors to discover the grounds slowly: from the gatehouse to the master house, main lodge, and guesthouse. The eco-friendly family retreat features a stacked wood facade that was built from fallen trees found on the site; a sod green roof that provides insulation; and regionally sourced construction materials—including stone, wood, windows, and doors.
Walls of glass, horizontal roof planes, and a natural material palette enable this expansive home to feel like an extension of a dramatic boulder-strewn landscape in Idaho.
The Coronado district near downtown Phoenix has an eclectic mix of home styles, ranging from 1930s Craftsman bungalows to modest brick colonials to small midcentury ranches. Lately, a growing number of glass-and-stucco minimalist newcomers are joining the mix—including several designed by Joel Contreras, a local real estate agent turned architectural designer whose family has lived in the area for five generations.
All of the labor and materials to build the homes were graciously donated, meaning that the design couldn't be too extravagant and work well with the given materials. Community First! wanted each home to feel warm and welcoming, but also be relatively maintenance-free.
"The main issue with site planning is the units are relatively dense out there," Taylor says. "The building has to take advantage of sun orientation and seasonal breezes, but also have privacy. This site, in particular, was also next to a swale so there are many insects during the summer months."
Community First! has anchored itself within the community through partnerships with various businesses, other nonprofits, faith organizations, and local schools, offering its residents opportunities for success in every aspect of their lives.
This single-family residence in Bloomfield, Michigan, known as the Treehaus, embodies the iconic style of midcentury modernism. Thanks to a thoughtful renovation, this rare dwelling has been restored to its original state of refined elegance.
"When you pull up to the garage doors, you intuitively know where the front door is, but there's nothing that says entrance," he says. "Instead we did it through the landscaping and architecture."
In the evening, the slats reveal a glow from within, giving the project its name, Lantern Studio.
The screen stops short of the frame’s end. “We wanted to peel it back, so you could see the steel beneath,” says Flavin.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.