100 Exterior Wood Siding Material Flat Roofline Design Photos And Ideas

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.

New addition at rear of house framing the original house and interior areas
Named after its charred larch cladding, this tea room, designed by Czech studio A1 Architects, sits next to a lake in a woodland area near the city of Česká Lípa in the Czech Republic. Its sliding doors can be opened for enhanced connectivity with the surrounding nature, or closed to create a more secluded oasis. At the center of the space is a hearth with a teapot suspended from the sisal rope domed ceiling above it.
Dr. Kenneth Montague’s Toronto loft is both home and art gallery—and the ultimate party house, thanks to two kitchens, a rooftop deck, and no shortage of conversation pieces. In warm weather, Montague’s parties spill onto the roof deck. To encourage guests to explore, Peterson designed two built-in light fixtures, made from LEDs behind white acrylic panels, that cast a dramatic glow across the sauna’s custom-made wood door, designed by Peterson and crafted by carpenter Daniel Liebster.
Rooftop Patio
Making use of the hilltop location, each window was planned to frame interesting vistas or to find the best sight lines around adjoining buildings.
“I simply was drawn to the notion of concrete. So much great modern architecture has made use of it,” Blauvelt says.
Paths from the house connect to nearby hiking trails for outdoor and wildlife experiences.
Snow buries scrub oak trees in front of the home's west elevation.
The home's deck is perched over a canyon full of wildlife and rugged vegetation.
Warm cedar siding contrasts the snow capped ridge on a bright Utah winter day.
Working with architect Vincent James in the late 1990s, Coen and Partners were charged with integrating the 8,000-square-foot Type Variant House outside of Minneapolis into the ever-changing, lush wooded surroundings.
One view of the Finn Lofts' southwest corner includes a cut-out rain screen.
The driveway has a permeable surface.
A basic box that’s as tall as it is wide (28 feet) and 16 feet long, this Portland, Oregon house consists of rooms stacked vertically: an unfinished basement on the bottom, a kitchen-living area and a bathroom in the middle, and a bedroom on top, with the stairwell hinged onto the front of the home. The only interior doors are those to the bathroom, basement, and root cellar, leaving the rest of the space open and unfettered. At just 704 square feet, Katherine Bovee and Matt Kirkpatrick's home is a great lesson in making the most out of every inch. Click here to see the interior.
“Initially the design had the studios completely separated from the main house with a sort of breezeway in between,” says Stern, who ultimately decided to physically connect them in a way that evokes walking through the outdoors. “The studios and breezeway are separated from the main house with pocket doors to create privacy when needed, and allow it to function as a separate guest suite for overnight visitors.”
While the home’s simple, boxy forms starkly contrast with surrounding residences, its compact shape and modest scale help it fit into the traditional neighborhood without calling attention to itself. The house was built around a large birch tree, with dwarf fountain grass and porcupine grass planted in front. A weeping blue atlas cedar provides a focal point near the front door.
The larch rainscreen covering the second floor give the house a light appearance and also provides privacy. Though it's difficult for outsiders to look in, the openings between the slats of wood let the family sneak views to the outside.
“The first floor was about making something warm and woody that would blend into the natural environment,” architect Stephen Chung says of his Wayland, Massachusetts, home. “The second floor was a chance to experiment.”
The exterior, which was taken down to the studs and rebuilt, pairs the original concrete block with reclaimed hemlock, which clads two sides of the upstairs addition.
Minarc’s GRASSsit bar stools, topped with synthetic turf recycled from football fields, sit near the  barbecue.
Front Patio area with reclaimed tobacco storage wood facade
The wooded site allowed for  soaring, curtainless windows that the couple couldn’t have enjoyed downtown.
Theron Humphrey's new home in Nashville, Tenn.
The Shayan House takes full advantage of its canyon site.
The transformed facade features dark gray stained-masonry.
The cantilevered entry court assists with the reinforcement by securing the building’s weight seaward.
The eastern side offers an equally mesmerizing view of Mount Tamalpais, which is lush with foliage throughout the year.
From his perch Dwares can enjoy a glass of wine while gazing at the ocean.
The master bedroom opens on two sides to the outdoors, where Lockyer placed a custom black-chrome wall clock.

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