373 Exterior Wood Siding Material House Glass Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

For an escape from bustling San Francisco, architect Craig Steely and his wife Cathy have created a modernist getaway on a lava field next to a black sand beach on Hawaii’s Big Island. Fitted with floor-to-ceiling windows that look out over the ocean, the steel-framed home is one of several homes that Steely built on the recently active lava field.
Fed up with flashy, environmentally insensitive beach homes, architect Gerald Parsonson and his wife, Kate, designed a humble hideaway nestled behind sand dunes along the New Zealand coastline. Crafted in the image of a modest Kiwi bach, their 1,670-square-foot retreat consists of a group of small buildings clad in black-stained pine weatherboards and fiber-cement sheets.
On the green roof, guests enjoy stunning panoramic views, a hydromassage pool, and a lounge area.
The beautifully landscaped backyard features a lush lawn, a spacious side patio, and a large side yard with a variety of blossoming trees and flowers.
The main house has windows in every room that capture the spectacular view. The off-grid property is equipped with a solar power system and has access to spring water.
16 Kirby Lane North is rooted in midcentury-modern tradition, despite having undergone some recent additions.
A unique curved wall continues inside to contain the service areas of the home including the kitchen cabinets, laundry, and coat closet.
"This project really feels like a gift," says architect Ruud Visser of the completed home.
The low-slung roof helps to integrate the home into its sylvan surroundings.
The father of architect Greg Dutton wished to build a cabin on the family farm, located within Appalachian Ohio and home to 400 heads of cattle. Dutton, of Pittsburgh and Columbus, Ohio-based Midland Architecture, presented this design as his father’s birthday present in 2012. Finished in 2014, the 900-square-foot cabin operates entirely off-the-grid.
Fresh, bright, and cheery, the updated architecturally significant residence complements the couple’s modern lifestyle.
The retreat's exterior is clad in cedar shingles to give it a tree house feel. The shingles will weather to gray over time. Dutton wanted to avoid having the cabin stand out, instead revealing itself gradually against the surrounding landscape.
The guest house glows night.
The home is perched on a hill overlooking Hidden Lake.
The side approach to the home.
The Northwest Regional Style emphasized verticality, large windows, exposed framing, and often a formal T-shape plan.
The upper floor is wrapped in glass, with the exception of the solid wood front door and the cantilevering roof.
The 4,600-square-foot home is set on bucolic farmland.
The home's two volumes are distinct not only in their orientation, but also in their materiality. The lower level is wrapped in stone, while the upper level is composed of glass.
A 100-mile drive from the Big Apple, the 15-acre property in Orient, New York, serves as a vacation retreat and refuge for a Brooklyn couple.
Ryall deftly integrated the home into its natural setting.
For O’Reilly, paring the design back to a minimum was important from both an aesthetic and budget standpoint.
Exterior drone axonometric
Exterior at Dusk
Exterior
Exterior within Context
Exterior Slatted Entry Volume
The rear view of the home.
The home features a two-car garage with clerestory windows that keep the interior bright.
A view of the three-story DFAB House perched atop the NEST Building.
The Light House is a vacation home in Denmark designed by Søren Sarup of Danish firm Puras Architecture. It consists of a low-lying Douglas fir–clad volume topped with a slate-covered A-frame.
A glazed extension to Rini van Beek’s home just outside Antwerp, Belgium makes an old holiday A-frame home more suitable for permanent living.
Consisting of three prefabricated units in West Seattle on a 5,000 square-foot lot, the Genesee Townhomes—by Method Homes and Chris Pardo Design—from 1,250-1,400 square feet, each with three bedrooms and two and a half bathrooms.
The gently sloping nature of the block generated a step in the house levels,  which O’Reilly used  to delineate living and sleeping zones.
The galvanized steel frames, visible from both the interior and exterior, create a repetitive rhythm along the north and south elevations.
A dramatic cantilevered roof extends over the lower building volume, tying together the separate, yet connected, blocks of the home.
An interior courtyard is covered by trellised shading above, filtering light into the living spaces.
Wood screens provide privacy to the lower level, while allowing for ventilation in this hot, humid climate.
The new addition opens the interiors to the garden.
The wood-clad home sits between tall native grasses and dense foliage.
A refined, simple exterior palette of wood, stucco, and concrete allows the true architectural form to shine and blend in with the landscape.
The house also comes with a dock.
The curved roof, a play off the hull of a ship, was inspired by a previous Atelier SAD home project in the Czech town of Liberec. Jerry Koza, along with engineer Tomas Kalhous and architect Adam Jirkal, spent years finding the right location and obtaining permissions. After the rigid approval process, they’re finally able to showcase the flexibility of the concept, which can range from a one-person dwelling to a family-sized float with a 1,076-square-foot floor plan and a 538-square-foot terrace.
Steep street. Original garage door and wooden louvers.  New third floor glass louvers.
The American Woolens Dye house is a brick and timber structure that was originally built in 1880.
Lisbeth Juul and Laust Nørgaard drew upon their years of experience living on the water to design and build an 860-square-foot floating home in Copenhagen Harbor. The home’s minimal form and furnishings reflect the residents’ desire to downsize following three years on land.
A terrace is located just off the master suite.
Mount Pleasant Modern: Front Elevation
Mount Pleasant Modern: Main Entry
From the street, the house appears as a modest, single-family home in scale with many of the older, post-war homes which exist in the area. But upon entering the house, it’s surprisingly expansive.
Aranzazu House - Besonías Almeida arquitectos
The shingled, zinc-roofed boathouse was envisioned as a simple port of call, where “the only luxury was the landscape,” says Guillermo.
Guillermo, who left the land-scaping mostly natural, is now planting trees to help offset deforestation in the region.
Suspended in the forest, the Pinecone tree house is a sight to behold.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.