906 Exterior Wood Siding Material House Flat Roofline Design Photos And Ideas

Fed up with flashy, environmentally insensitive beach homes, architect Gerald Parsonson and his wife, Kate, designed a humble hideaway nestled behind sand dunes along the New Zealand coastline. Crafted in the image of a modest Kiwi bach, their 1,670-square-foot retreat consists of a group of small buildings clad in black-stained pine weatherboards and fiber-cement sheets.
Simple in form, but built of multiple layers, this contemporary home plays with light, function, and form.
On the green roof, guests enjoy stunning panoramic views, a hydromassage pool, and a lounge area.
MWArchitekten utilized local wood to harmonize the home's interiors with its facade.
The fence in front of the house creates an L-shaped courtyard. The entrance is tucked behind the private gate.
The home's exterior has a fresh coat of paint,  a new modern fence, and beautiful landscaping.
The 1000-square-foot ADU is two levels with a footprint that allows the owners to retain plenty of outdoor space for their dogs to play. The façade “is a rain screen system, so the heat gain on the Brazilian hardwood is minimized by being physically separated by an air gap between it and the membrane behind it,” said Knight. “So, the wood heats up when sun hits it and this is not directly translated into the wall on the interior; it is instead buffered by this air gap.” The large doors and second-story skylights then work together to pull a nice breeze through the house.
A detail of the façade shows the combination of materials and textural contrasts. Metal accents mix with Cumaru slats, measuring 1x4, at the upper level, and grey stucco at the lower level.
The 1,000-square-foot ADU is two levels with a footprint that allows the owners to retain plenty of outdoor space for their dogs to play. The facade “is a rain screen system, so the heat gain on the Brazilian hardwood is minimized by being physically separated by an air gap between it and the membrane behind it,” says Knight. “So, the wood heats up when sun hits it, and this is not directly translated into the wall on the interior; it is instead buffered by this air gap.” The large doors and second-story skylights then work together to pull a nice breeze through the house.
An exterior view shows how the building wraps around the site’s existing trees.
The architects planned the home’s footprint around the roots of the heritage oak trees on the site, and ensured that the building height would fit under the canopy.
The home’s original facade was clad in plain-looking siding, which was common in the ’50s and ’60s. The renovation finished the facade with smooth stucco, expansion joints, Hardie siding, and redwood.
The deck off of the bedroom has two swings attached.
Stilts elevate the home three to 10 feet above the ground. The firm suspended the building in order to preserve the root systems of the surrounding trees.
16 Kirby Lane North is rooted in midcentury-modern tradition, despite having undergone some recent additions.
The project's prime, corner lot real estate dictated the organization of the separate living quarters. The main house's driveway and entryway, for example, are located on Maude Street, giving permanent residents a sense of privacy.
Spacious windows and a slotted facade provide curbside appeal at every angle.
Maude Street House by Murray Legge
The low-slung roof helps to integrate the home into its sylvan surroundings.
Wild bush, sand dunes, and scrub surrounds the circular home. The architects were careful to minimize the building impact on the fragile landscape.
The distinctive facade references a traditional thatched English cottage.
Intersecting lines and geometric forms make up the facade of 252 Clyde Drive.
After: Elevated landscaping allows the lush greenery of the outdoors to take center stage.
With its low-slung roof, wood siding, and generous eaves, the exterior delivers classic midcentury flair.
New concrete stairs, interspersed with Ipe decking, visually connect with the house.
The architects created an entry vestibule by reorienting the front door.
The team took the home down to the foundation and rebuilt on the existing footprint, which is composed of three wings: one that houses the living and dining spaces, one that includes the kitchen and family room, and a third that contains the master suite. The new facade combines Western Red Cedar for the siding, vertical slats, and roof fascia with white cement plaster accents.
The architects write: "Most Australians want a deck or veranda, instead of adding something to the outside, like that of the classic old Australian home. At St Andrews Beach House, the deck has been eroded out of the form itself, creating a two-story space that’s both outside and inside."
The silvertop ash shiplap boards that clad the home will develop a patina over time.
The guest house glows night.
This Eichler is wrapped with vertical western red cedar. One of the reasons Klopf Architecture selected this material is because of its low-VOC stain. It matches the color of the original siding, which had sadly seen better days.
In the South Bay, San Jose–based BLAINE Architects expanded this Eichler by transforming the old carport into an atrium. A folding glass NanaWall system allows the owners to watch their kids in the playroom from the kitchen.
The upper floor is wrapped in glass, with the exception of the solid wood front door and the cantilevering roof.
The 4,600-square-foot home is set on bucolic farmland.
The home's two volumes are distinct not only in their orientation, but also in their materiality. The lower level is wrapped in stone, while the upper level is composed of glass.
Klopf Architecture's modest 72-square-foot addition at the front of the home blends in with the original structure while giving the owners a greater sense of openness in the master and hall bathrooms. Inside, the re-imagined great room now features dining space.
A view of the exterior from their walk path.
At just under 3,000 square feet with three bedrooms plus an office, this home follows the basic plan of Stillwater's sd-161 design. It also features a separate guest house with two bedrooms.
Clerestory windows bring in daylight, supplemented by museum-quality lighting, to highlight the homeowner's art collection.
Based on Stillwater's sd-133 plan, this home has 2,300 square feet of space with dramatic ceilings (over 12 feet high) and no interior load-bearing walls. The home also features Stillwater's signature butterfly roof.
The house is powered by rooftop solar panels.
Built in 1950 and extensively remodeled over the years, the L-shaped midcentury house is optimized for indoor/outdoor living.
Supported by concrete columns, the home hovers above the sandy  terrain. An expansive ocean-front deck blends indoor and outdoor living spaces.
Located in a coveted, beachfront, gated community, this Malibu home is surrounded by ocean views and miles of walking trails.
The front and rear yards feature drought-tolerant modern landscaping with new hardscapes.
23 San Marino Court's flat top, post-and-beam facade.
A south elevation view of the home. The southern porch, which faces the river, is the "extroverted" courtyard, while the northern courtyard offers a more intimate and "introverted" feel.
A 100-mile drive from the Big Apple, the 15-acre property in Orient, New York, serves as a vacation retreat and refuge for a Brooklyn couple.
To bring the property back to its natural glory, landscape architect Lillian Ball removed invasive plantings and replaced them with indigenous landscaping.
Concrete walls support the living space and elevate it from storm surges.
Floor-to-ceiling sliding doors open to the great outdoors, and industrial-grade metal screens keep bugs from entering and provide protection for those standing up against windows.
Ryall deftly integrated the home into its natural setting.
Set on a one-acre wooded bluff overlooking Puget Sound, the Tree House is clad in low-maintenance materials including Cor-Ten steel, stained cedar shiplap, and painted HardiePlank.
Exterior drone axonometric
Exterior at Dusk
Exterior
Exterior within Context

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.