142 Exterior Wood Siding Material Cabin Flat Roofline Design Photos And Ideas

In the shadow of Denali mountain, amid Alaska’s meadows and icy streams, a former teacher and a four-time Iditarod winner calls upon Mayer Sattler-Smith to design a modernist cabin as expansive as the Last Frontier.
Set amidst the mow eastern mountains of Pueblo Eden, this contemporary home was constructed in four months with a prefab steel-frame system clad in low-maintenance sheet metal.
A look at one of the pavilions glowing gorgeously at night.
A wooden bridge provides access to the elevated cabin. “The woods is a mix of deciduous and coniferous forest with soft moss covering large expanses of the forest floor,” notes the architect. “If you are lucky, and quiet, you may well see deer, rabbits, or pheasants.”
A tree grows through the center of the cabin, which is elevated 26 feet in the air and supported by thin metal pillars.
Zinc-clad extensions jut out from the main timber structure to frame panoramic views of the forest from all directions.
The angular exterior is sheathed in untreated larch wood, zinc, and glass.
The first Løvtag cabin (of nine planned) is located in a forest at Als Odde. “The cabins are located on a small hilltop overlooking a meadow which gives a wonderful view over the top of the forest and lets the sunshine in during the afternoon,” says architect Sigurd Larsen.
The cabin's curved zinc shell exudes a rugged, industrial look.
Visitors learn about energy and water conservation as they climb outdoor staircases that lead from the forest floor to the 125-foot-high rooftop rising above the leaf canopy.
The 4TREEHOUSE features a futuristic illuminated facade that looks like something straight out of a science fiction movie.
Solar panels on the roof of the Penner cabin provide all the electricity it needs. The cabins are mobile to reduce the impact to the land, and to take advantage of different locations depending on the season.
The cabins share a common interior and exterior material palette for consistency, and to better allow them blend in with the hillside. "The design of the wood houses aims to harmonize with the landscape and the rustic atmosphere while forming a contrast to the existing village buildings," says the firm.
Much was done so as not to disrupt the natural rock formations and surrounding forest when siting and building the cabins.
Each cabin is constructed from an elevated steel platform with charred wood siding. A footpath connects them.
"We avoided complex or exaggerated designs and selected three basic geometric forms," say the architects. Extensive site surveys enabled them to choose the best placement for the cabins on the hillside, and the best shape for each spot.
"Unlike other rural areas, the village of Tuanjie has little traditional architecture to hold onto," says the firm. "Instead, the striking landscapes and pollution-free farmlands are the village’s greatest assets."
Cedar Shakes and Vertical Siding
Fast assembly, affordability, and energy efficiency make kit homes a desirable option for homeowners.
Milwaukee studio Vetter Denk Architects designed this eye-catching prefab on the banks of Moose Lake, Wisconsin, as a weekend retreat. 

The home was based on an idea presented by the home's owner, who was inspired by a screw-top jug of $9.99 red wine.
Based in New York City, Cocoon9 takes a unique approach to prefab homes, offering a line of tiny homes with high-quality construction and finishes, smart technology, energy efficiencies, and versatile spaces that are ready for the modern market.
The Minimod by MAPA of Montevideo, Uruguay, is a primitive refuge with a modern twist.
For her family’s house near Melbourne, Anna Horne created a series of prefab wood modules using a design from the company Prebuilt. She found the old industrial letter at a factory; it stands for Somerset, the name of the house.
Established in the 1970s, Bensonwood continue to refine the forgotten craft of framing buildings, and complete projects that range from traditional timber frames to energy-efficient hybrids.
Designed by HGA Architects and Engineers—a firm with offices in eight cities across the country, including Minneapolis—these prefab cabins were designed off-site before being transported to the park and set atop a series of concrete piers.
The shell of the cabin was constructed with thin sections of hardwood, then coated with plain OSB plywood and a Tyvek air and water barrier. Metallic corrugated sheets form the outer layer.
The fully glazed facade physically and visually connects the interiors to the natural environment.
The cabin's large windows allow an unparalleled view of the pond it overlooks, while lush greenery seems to almost cover the exterior.
Although the cabin is a part of the hospital campus, special care has been taken to make sure its secluded location allows it to have an identity of its own.
Site placement was a lengthy process as the architects searched to optimize seclusion and spectacular views. Specialists, including ecologist Mark Wapstra, were brought on board to survey the site and ensure minimal landscape impact.
The facade is clad with beveled siding, stained dark to meld into the forest.
Shaped like a cross, this four-cornered villa offers four different views of its location on an island in Finland. Avanto Architects created a black exterior, dotted with large windows, to make it invisible from the nearby lake.
Built in 2005 for a client looking for a compact, easy-to-maintain shelter for his and his friends’ adventures, Delta Shelter’s design was inspired by structures like tree houses and fire lookouts.
A simple and restrained material palette kept construction costs low.
This 1,900-square-foot home was assembled on-site in just two days with wall panels consisting of staggered 2' x 4' studs on a 2' x 8' plate, which eliminates thermal bridging and maximizes energy efficiency.
The Treehouse, also part of the Post Ranch Inn, features Cor-ten panels.
The charred cedar exterior gently basks in the Alaskan sun.
Transformer or beach hut? Positioned in a coastal erosion zone, this holiday retreat for a family of five is completely capable of being relocated. An oversized shutter allows for protection from the elements when not in use and opens to allow sun in during the winter or provide shade on hot summer days. Waikato, New Zealand. By Crosson Clarke Carnachan Architects, from the book Rock the Shack, Copyright Gestalten 2013.
One of the main goals of the construction was to do as little harm as possible to the existing environment, which includes waterways that salmon depend upon. Herrin and his team created a garden roof that covers the full extent of the home to meet this objective. “This helps control storm water runoff and also replaces lost insect habitat—insects being a critical food source for juvenile salmon,” he says.
Erin Moore of FLOAT Architectural Research and Design, based in Tucson, Arizona, designed a 70-square-foot writer’s retreat in Wren, Oregon, for her mother, Kathleen Dean Moore, a nature writer and professor of philosophy at nearby Oregon State University. The elder Moore wanted a small studio in which to work and observe the delicate wetland ecosystem on the banks of the Marys River. Enlisting her daughter’s design expertise, her professor husband’s carpentry savoir faire, the aid of friends, and a front loader, Kathleen and her crew erected the structure in September 2007. Photo by Gary Tarleton. Totally off the grid—–Kathleen forgoes the computer and writes by hand when there—–the Watershed was designed to tread as lightly on the fragile ecosystem as the wild turkeys and Western pond turtles that live nearby. “
Debbi Gibbs loved the seeming wilderness of the area, especially considering its relative proximity to her New York apartment. She bought a ramshackle cabin with plans to tear it down and start fresh, then bided her time until she found just the right architects. Enter Joseph Tanney and Robert Luntz of Resolution: 4 Architecture, who granted her wish for an open prefabricated structure with custom design touches.
In the land of large mountain lodge wannabes, two California natives tuck Utah’s first LEED for Homes–rated house onto the side of Emigration Canyon. Photo by Dustin Aksland
In the shadow of the newly renamed mountain Denali, amid Alaska’s meadows and icy streams, a former teacher and a four-time Iditarod winner built a modernist cabin as expansive as the Last Frontier.
For the Butterfly cabin, which is part of the Post Ranch Inn, Muennig chose materials that age gracefully when exposed to the elements. He regularly uses Cor-Ten steel, a group of steel alloys that form a stable rust-like appearance when battered by wind and rain.
Delta Shelter, a cabin getaway on the same property as the Rolling Huts. We visited the owner and his wife during one of our visits to get an in-person reference for Tanner Construction. It was wonderful to see the house in person after drooling over it in the pages of Tom Kundig: Houses. Photo by Tim Bies.
Modern in Montana: a Flathead Lake cabin that's a grownup version of a treehouse.
A standing-seam steel roofing panel clads a portion of the exterior, while the aluminum pipes also serve as the railing for the roof deck. The family cooks all their meals at the fire pit outside.
Architect Bill Yudchitz asked his son, Daniel, to help him create a self-sustaining multi-level family cabin in Bayfield, Wisconsin.
Designed by Jensen & Skovdin, the Juvet's first-generation cabins are built on stilts in order to impact the environment as little as possible. Despite the modernist aesthetic, the buildings were built by local craftsmen using traditional materials and techniques.
One of the most astounding views from the house extends all the way to Mt. McKinley, the highest point in North America at over 20,000 feet.
Those seeking isolation and inspiration to tackle their work need look no further. A minimalist cube set against a picturesque background form a studio free of distraction, except maybe that view! Newfoundland, Canada. By Saunders Architecture from the book Rock the Shack, Copyright Gestalten 2013.
Perched over a cliff face, the hooded deck of the Gambier Residence reads like a ship’s prow over Howe Sound, the scenic waters near Vancouver.
The facade is clad with beveled siding, stained dark to meld into the forest.
Deep eaves prevent the entrance from being buried in snow. The clients can see directly into the valley and mountains below.
Large sliding glass doors allow daylight to fill the living room. Smaller windows are placed in the kitchen area and the sleeping loft. The exterior is clad in heart pine which needs very little up-keep and is known for its strength and hardness.
The House for a Musher is all about taking advantage of its hilltop site. The courtyard in the front has vast views and the house itself is oriented toward the surrounding landscape.
Project Name: Orchard

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Large windows punctuate the north elevation to pull views of the the water and landscape indoors.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.