388 Exterior Wood Siding Material Cabin Building Type Design Photos And Ideas

Pig Rock Bothy and Inshriach Bothy are tow of the handcrafted structures that inspire artists who use it a residency spaces.
A bothy is a small Scottish laborer’s hut or mountain refuge.
Each Getaway cabin has a hot shower with bath products, and electric toilet, mini-kitchen, hearing, and either one or two queen beds with, fresh linens, and pillows.
Night view from the sea
Honka’s Kippari log homes come with large windows that are perfect for framing beautiful natural sceneries.
A Honka model called Kommodori was used for this seaside home,
The bothy was designed as low-impact architecture, meant to enhance the experience of spending time in nature.
The bothy was designed as low-impact architecture, meant to enhance the experience of spending time in nature.
The Bothy can be installed on site in just a number of hours.
The Bothy’s clean outline conceals a drainage system and 10cm of wood-fiber insulation.
The Bothy has a fully insulated envelope and is double glazed.
With an internal space of 132 square feet and a 18' x 9.8' footprint, the Artist Bothy is constructed from cross-laminated timber panels clad in Corten corrugated metal and Scottish larch.
The Bothy Project's original design located in the Cairngorms National Park.
Although Jay Nelson thinks it’s great that there’s interest in tiny homes, and that is pushes us to minimize our consumption and environmental footprint, he feels that really tiny houses can be challenging for most people.
Only local materials were used to build the chalet, including the larch wood cladding of the exterior, to reinforce the connection between indoors and outdoors.
The hut, which was completed in 2010, measures in at just 97 square feet and sits along the north edge of a pond. Photo by Phillip Kalantzis-Cope.
The trailer is clad in corrugated fiberglass and steel, and internally lined in used, cleaned shuttering plywood. All of the joinery is from plywood offcuts, including the two staircases. Handrails are made from offcuts of blue rope, left over from Studio in the Woods. High levels of natural light are provided by both gable ends which are ‘glazed’ with high-performance interlocking polycarbonate.
The home hovers above the ground on concrete bases, so as not to intrude too heavily on the natural landscape. Note the red hatch door from the loft bedroom that can be lowered.
The home features materials, cabinetry, and plants salvaged from homes slated to be demolished.
The home's minimalist construction includes a mix of unfinished and charred plywood to form a simple two-story volume with a slightly sloping roof and cantilevered bedroom loft with clerestory windows made from polycarbonate panels.
The constraints informed the building design, and were embraced—for example, the cladding that was milled at the end was only enough to partially clad the studio.
The studio is built on two floors—there is a 592-square-foot enclosed space accessed via a bridge from the slope which is above an open workshop.
Designed by architect Tanja Rytkönen, Vista is a compact log home with a high pitched roof, and fully glazed façade.
Located on a rocky seaside plot in Inkoo, Finland, this family home designed by architect Katja Jämsä was built with 204-millimeter wide Honka Fusion non-settling laminated timber, and includes large glass windows and doors.
Architects Jaakko and Elizaveta Parkkonen designed and built Savukvartsi as their own city home, which they share with their parents and children.
Designed by architects and experienced sailor Kari Leppänen, Honka’s Saari villa was built with 134-milimeter thick square logs treated with a dark finish, and has three-meter wide eaves that provide shade, and wind protection for the outdoor patio.
Winner of the 2011 Log House of the Year Award, the 1,206-square-meter Lokki, which was designed by as architect Kari Lappalainen, and furnished by interior designer Hanni Koroma, has an inverted pitch roof that’s inspired by seagull wings.
This wilderness sauna cabin in the west coast of Finland was built with 112-millimeter thick squrae logs, and has a 1,028-square-foot outdoor terrace.
This house has a sauna and four bedrooms, including a master bedroom on the second level that looks down onto the lake.
The exterior of Kide, a sauna cabin in the west coast of Finland.
A-Frame Entrance and Facade
In the tower pod, there’s an open plan master bedroom and bathroom on the top floor with the children’s bedroom, utility, and bathroom underneath. The pod on the opposite end is for guests and can be closed off when they don’t need it.
The home’s design began with a traditional cabin form that broke off from there to split, twist, and rotate into four pods. The residence perfectly blends with the surrounding landscape with its larch lad exterior.
First, a concrete slat was poured into the ground with strategically placed dwarf walls built on top. Working as an adjustable “raft,” a floating structural frame was placed on top of the walls allowing for potential movement. If that happens, there are mechanical jacks placed underneath the frame in case the house needs to be leveled again.
Next to an old farmhouse in the East Tyrolean village of Nussdorf, Austria, is an unusually shaped, shingle-clad cabin that's raised up on skinny steel struts.  
Set on a hilly incline and designed by architects Peter and Lukas Jungmann, the cabin appears to hover above ground like some sort of alien object—a stark contrast to its pastoral environment and the traditional Austrian chalets that surround it.  
Because of its irregular, otherworldly form, and how it seems to be suspended in midair, the cabin was named
"In the western facade of the building the individual characters of the different units are most obvious, while in the eastern facade (seen here) their coherence and the cabin as a whole is more prominent," write the architects.
Another view of the back of the building.
The house cantilevers out over the landscape for unimpeded views. “It’s canted wall defines the main entrance and creates a covered space for unpacking and packing—a familiar family ritual,” Howat says.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.

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