58 Exterior Stucco Siding Material Wood Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

Main facade
“I wanted to plant a green roof for its thermal mass, but I wanted it to be as natural as possible,” Liang says.
Landside Elevation
Bay Elevation
Front Elevation with Glimpse of Bay
Front Door
Street Elevation
The building retains its original footprint; this was an important detail for the homeowners who wanted to be as environmentally-friendly as possible. “The biggest element I work with is to use the existing structure when I remodel,” says Juilland.
The facade has rustic overtones thanks to white-washed tongue-and-groove pine and Dryvit stucco with a limestone finish.
Most impressive of all, a solar array on the roof empowers the residents to produce more energy than they consume on-site.
On a five-acre property outside Taos, New Mexico, designer Molly Bell worked closely with her father, builder Ed Bell, to create a new residence for owner Lois Rodin. “Lois requested that it appear as a grouping of individual masses, so that it read more like a cluster than a solitary shape,” Molly says. “I hope it shows that it’s OK to do something modern in such a traditional environment, and not to be afraid of it.”
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Taos, New Mexico
Dwell Magazine : July / August 2017
The facade was enhanced with a new porch, steel canopy, and planters, as well as new windows.
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Denver, Colorado
Dwell Magazine : September / October 2017
Main elevation
Making use of the hilltop location, each window was planned to frame interesting vistas or to find the best sight lines around adjoining buildings.
The house clearly displays its Sea Ranch–style touches.
Another backyard hotspot is the deck, built around an existing boulder, where adults can lounge while the kids climb.
The VitraHaus was designed by Basel-based firm Herzog & de Meuron and completed in 2010. The building is made of poured-in-place concrete, with the exterior covered in dark plaster and local fir.
The exterior, which was taken down to the studs and rebuilt, pairs the original concrete block with reclaimed hemlock, which clads two sides of the upstairs addition.
On the opposite side of the abstract front elevation, the home opens up and presents an entirely different viewing experience. “Like a flower leaning [towards the] sunlight, the architectural volumes pull and open up towards the views of the lake,” says Miller. A stacked timber retaining wall serves both structural and aesthetic functions; in addition to holding back the earth the home has been buried into, it visually defines the its perimeter.
The structure is sited on a slope that dips to the east, allowing for a generous basement that Ian uses for his business, Treebird Construction.
The hardscaping helps keep water use to a minimum. The Lais used gravel—accented by drought-tolerant bamboo—to create their side yard.
The black finish on the exterior facades is a modern interpretation of Corey, the artisan stucco used in traditional Mexican Cities.
Front
Front facade
this is the South facing front of the home
this is the North facing side of the home
the back east facing side of the house
South Side/Garage-The home is designed as a U-Shape creating a courtyard around the large Live Oak Tree.  The site is designed to absorb 100% of the water that falls on the site.
Looking West
The entrance emerges in a tight exterior passage
Street View
As the house is situated on a steep slope, visitors enter only to be whisked upstairs to the main living space. The facade was designed by Bob Hatfield in 1996. A new glass and steel door, designed by Chris Deam and fabricated by Sand Studios, was added in the renovation.
The house is located in the Camp Biscayne area of Coconut Grove, a neighborhood in Miami. Its main volume is clad in Prodema.
Though the Cook Inlet is nearby, from the street, the house’s simple facade gives little indication of the sights that await a visitor.
 Landscape design by West Architecture Studio. Planting design by Brendan Butler
Modern Lodge, exterior - The design approach of the site is to connect
the house to the land
Covered deck, sunken fire pit, and pool

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.