298 Exterior Stone Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

The south façade of Ellsworth Kelly's "Austin" at the Blanton Museum of Art with an entry door fabricated from live oak.
The home is concealed behind horizontal bands of materials including Aji stone quarried from Shikoku, a powder-coated aluminum screen (lath), the white plaster exterior of the second floor, and a titanium zinc alloy roof.
An aerial view of Melissa Young's desert hacienda.
La Vinya, PGA Golf Resort | Studio RHE
La Vinya, PGA Golf Resort | Studio RHE
This backyard home office for a couple in London is constructed with all-timber structural framing and is clad in cork and topped with a vegetated roof. These eco-friendly materials make for a delightfully sensory space with lots of lighting provided by the skylight and glass and oak door.
IF House - Photo 18
IF House - Photo 11
Fallingwater, view of entry (center) with trellis beams extending across drive.
The restored 17th-century farmhouse in the Baix Empordà region of Spain.
This stunning property features unique marble masonry—an element not found in any other Frank Lloyd Wright home.
According to the architects, the screened porch panels (on the left) were site-built by the contractor to have similar dimensions as the Marvin windows (to the right). Dramatic black sashes unite the facade. Thin mull covers between window units blend with the exterior siding, "which afforded a consistency that we were after," said Wiedemann. Native stone on the foundation is similar to old Virginia farmhouses.
Walden 7's unsystematic layout offers an alternative to conventional apartment blocks.
Walden 7 features five interior courtyards and 446 residences.
The cabin’s exterior walls and roof are clad in overlapping stone plates that mimic the look of traditional wood paneling found in Western Norway. “It provides an affinity with the cabins nearby,” partner and architect Nils Ole Bae Brandtzæg explains. Solar panels cover the chimney pipe, lighting LED lamps inside.
front elevation - towards south
front elevation towards south....
west elevation
Le LAD intentionally designed the asymmetric windows on this gable wall to give the impression that they've been added over time.
Perched atop a mountain on over six acres of woods, this young couple's weekend getaway incorporates the old with the new.
Designers Russell Pinch and Oona Bannon kept many of the architectural details of the 300-year-old cow barn they turned into a second home, including its terra-cotta roof tiles. The primary structural change took place on the front facade, which they tore down and rebuilt, opening space for a traditional oeil-de-boeuf window. The door on the left opens to a workshop. In addition to designing furniture, the couple also create interiors for select clients.
The home is composed of limestone masonry and structural steel accents.
The building takes advantage of passive heating and cooling, thanks to Blee and Halligan's strategic design to capture the most sunlight in the winter and provide the most shade in the summer. The above-ground glass facade faces east and draws in the daylight, but when the sun proves too strong, whoever is staying in the structure can close the internal shutters to beat the heat.
The renovation literally raised the roof, increasing the interior ceiling height and allowing for the addition of clerestory windows.
The second guest suite, clad in cedar and aluminum, extends over a horizontal limestone wall.
Dramatic in its horizontal expression, this private residence appears to extend into the landscape via deep overhangs and visual transparency.
The futuristic residence is defined by its natural topography emerging from the landscape, yet partially embedded within it.
A narrow creek was carved into the edge of the rock wall to “extend nature into the site.”
The Chilmark House exterior is clad in shou sugi ban siding and roofed with zinc.
A new 50-years cedar shake roof with copper flashing was installed just last year.
A separate two-car garage is located near the entrance of the house, which has a bike rack and planters out front.
Reinforced concrete was used for the retaining walls and slabs along all grades, while wood framing with steel framing beams were used at cantilevered areas.
The plot slopes downward from street level.
A look at the exterior of the cabin.
To minimize water use, SCDA and Strata Landscape Architecture designed a native, drought-resistant planting plan with sensor-controlled drip irrigation. The lawn takes up less than 10% of the landscape.
Vertical planks of western red cedar provide a warm contrast against horizontal zinc siding panels.
Set within a corner lot, the home takes advantage of views outward along the length of the site through large expanses of clear glazing.
The spacious second-story terrace projects toward the south to overlook views of the meadow.
A glimpse of the master bedroom framed with full-height windows and sheltered by a deep roof overhang.
The extended overhanging roof with its tongue-and-groove hemlock soffit provides shade and shelter to the elevated courtyard.
The modern Montana home is nestled into a transitional zone between a forested butte and a grassy meadow in the western part of the state.
The dormers are clad in a modern zinc siding and jut out from a traditional pitched roof. Here, the Cenia Azul limestone façade feels restrained, yet still fits into the context of the more traditional neighborhood that surrounds it. The stone has been bush-hammered for a lighter finish and an almost suede-like texture, which complements the sleek dormers and custom mahogany windows and doors.
Madrigal House by Paul Raff Studio integrates modern and Edwardian touches.
 A garage and gym are contained within the lowest level of the house.
The mix of cedar and stone help integrate the dwelling into its natural setting.
The home cantilevers out over the series of stone-retaining walls.
The first floor is made up of glass walls that allow the site to appear to remain uninterrupted.
patio
The elongated, rectangular form has been delicately nestled into the island's steep terrain.
Beautifully renovated, the home has excellent curb appeal with low maintenance landscaping.
The exterior is composed of a rigid grid of Bluestone cladding that wraps the exterior facades.
"Local puzzolanic cement, commonly used for foundations, was used to give a reddish color to concrete to merge with the cliffs," explain the architects.
A charming 900-square-foot guest house sits on the property.
The home is oriented for cooling cross winds that sweep across the pool and bring constant breezes into the bedrooms and relief from the strong tropical heat.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.