309 Exterior Metal Siding Material Wood Siding Material Flat Roofline Design Photos And Ideas

“By using a hybrid model that includes both prefab and site-built construction, we were able to push the architectural vocabulary of prefab construction beyond the expected, with a bold, new visual vocabulary,” Denton says.
The tiny houseboat, named Sneci, is crafted primarily from wood and aluminum.
“As an architect, I found it highly interesting to conceptualize and design a living space that has no tangible groundwork or foundations,” Bene says. “The boat gives us an opportunity to spend time, eat, drink, sleep, and awaken nearly anywhere, while blurring the boundaries between our personal selves and nature.”
“One of the most important problems we had to deal with was how we used the space available,” says Bene. “We installed a sliding door between the interior and the open rear deck, which saved a lot of space and means that the door never blocks the view or the way.”
For sleeping under the stars, two benches on the deck can be transformed into single beds and topped with mosquito netting to keep bugs at bay.
The exterior is clad in a mix of redwood and aluminum.
“One important inspiration for the overall appearance were the local fishing boats,” Bene says. “These boats have no particular designer—each owner imagines and develops their boat according to their own ideas and needs. I tried to relate to this by articulating only small, understated gestures in the boat’s styling, reminiscent of the other boats in the area.”
Architect Tamás Bene drew inspiration for the houseboat design from the lake itself, along with local fishing boats and waterside huts.
“It was very important to me that the cabin be low to the ground,” says Diane. “I love the forest floor and the sway of our huge ponderosas, so I wanted as little disruption of the natural ecosystem as possible—a request which our builder, Trevor, honored admirably.”
The Far Cabin by Winkelman Architecture is set on the forested coast of Maine.
The ultimate escape for forest bathing, Denmark’s Løvtag is a tree house hotel that features three cabins that embrace Scandinavian minimalism. With tree trunks intersecting the interior, large windows, and a rooftop deck, these treehouses promise to make you feel at one with nature.
Thanks to a robust solar panel array, the house is net-zero, with enough energy to charge the couple's electric car as well.
The site was constrained by the root system of the mature trees, along with parking requirements, leading to a massing of two stacked boxes, with the larger upper level creating an overhang.
The 1,922-square-foot home was built on a double-wide lot that the owners purchased and subdivided with another couple.
Architects Ernesto Cragnolino and Krista Whitson designed and built an efficient four-bedroom home for their family in Austin.
The ground floor projects out from the slope and sits over the top of the concrete foundations, in which a wine cellar—accessed through a hatch in the hallway floor—is located.
The home is made of 42 unique cross-laminated timber panels. The smallest panel is 450 millimeters x 1500 millimeters, and the largest panel is the entire southern wall—14.4 meters x 2.3 meters. The cantilevered ground floor at the rear of the home was made possible by the strength of these panels.
There is a play between really earthy, natural materials—which are seen in some of the cladding, tiles, and concrete work—and a very sleek, black metal aesthetic. “I have a lot of experience in commercial architecture, so I’m not scared of using more commercial, industrial materials on a residential building,” says Craig.
The front door is crafted from solid spotted gum hardwood, which echoes the joinery used in the interior.
The tiny home is clad with standing-seam metal and cedar. An outdoor kitchen area on the deck provides added living space and ties the home to the natural landscape.
Tony and Charlotte Perez designed and built their own 280-square-foot home, which features an expansive deck off of the front facade.
A view of the parklike retreat from the backyard pool shows how the glass-enclosed entryway connects the living and sleeping areas.
"The use of materials, the careful details, the integrated sense of place, the weaving together of inside and out, and creating a special home that the clients love make this a special story for me," Epstein notes fondly.
As night falls, the home lights up like a lantern, enhancing the warm glow of the wood ceiling. Immense clerestory windows and glass sliders connect the home to the outdoors.
Built to commune with its scenic surroundings, this sustainable home embodies understated luxury.
The all-glass room provides views of the neighboring lake.
Walls of glass, horizontal roof planes, and a natural material palette enable this expansive home to feel like an extension of a dramatic boulder-strewn landscape in Idaho.
In the evening, the slats reveal a glow from within, giving the project its name, Lantern Studio.
The screen stops short of the frame’s end. “We wanted to peel it back, so you could see the steel beneath,” says Flavin.
A Cor-Ten steel planter running along one side is filled with Carex Ice Dance. “The plantings are minimalist, yet rich in color and texture,” says landscape architect H. Keith Wagner. The wood planters on the top level were custom designed by Kelton Woodwork.
The mezzanine has rooftop access through large, south-oriented glazed doors. A steel awning offers shade to the mezzanine level during summer months, and the inside face is clad with plywood to visually extend the interior space outward.
In Chile's Chiloé Archipelago, architect Guillermo Acuña developed a 12-acre island for his friends and family to unwind, first with a boathouse, later with pathway-connected cabins at the water's edge. Design details include glazed walls, eco-friendly pine, and a bright red palette that calls to mind the intensely colored chilco flowers that bloom here come spring and summer.
Windsor Residence by Dick Clark + Associates
007 House by Dick Clark + Associates
007 House by Dick Clark + Associates
Most of the year, the family keep the sliding glass doors—which span 16 feet from the living room to the exterior deck—of their Tampa dwelling open, giving it the aura of a Sarasota Modern home. Stunning cantilevered overhangs, in the spirit of Paul Rudolph's Umbrella House, help tame the sun.
An exercise in simplicity, the Sonoma weeHouse consists of two steel-framed volumes with ipe interiors, oiled oak cabinetry, and massive sliding glass walls that overlook valley views.
The green roof is planted with local succulents, including cascading pigface.
A Cor-Ten steel "sleeping volume" seemingly floats atop a predominantly glass "living volume." Intersecting these two stacked volumes is a double-height, timber box which houses the multipurpose spaces.
Bundeena Beach House connects the street and wider community to the water views beyond thanks to its low-lying form and a native roof garden, which the architect describes as a "green infinity edge."
If you've never set foot within a shipping container home, you might imagine them to be simple rectangles with no real consideration put into design, proportion, and the division of rooms. Well, think again: these floor plans prove that shipping container homes can be efficient, sustainable, and even exciting.
Large timber-framed glass sliding doors open the kitchen/dining space to the rear courtyard on two sides.
This one-bedroom NODE prefab slots perfectly into a Seattle backyard and produces all of its own energy—with enough leftover to power the neighboring house.
In addition to the workshop, the ground level holds an outdoor shower with easy beach access, a beach equipment storage closet, and a seasonal half bath.
RES4’s modular approach provides a Brooklyn family with a beautiful weatherproof retreat on Long Island. Designed as a hybrid between a double-wide and a courtyard house, the 1,650-square-foot North Fork Bay House was prefabricated off-site as two modules. In addition to time and cost savings, prefabrication helped address the restricted building site, which has a very long and narrow footprint limited by FEMA setback regulations and zoning laws.
Rudolph used red cannonballs as weights to hold the home’s signature wood shutters in place.
For architect Stephen Chung, the design of his Wayland, Massachusetts, home was all about blending into the natural environment. The first floor is a serene composition of white and wood. The demand for a domestic office space inspired him to build up, adding a second floor for him to "experiment." In a departure from the Cape Cod aesthetic that rules his block, he was able to give the addition a modernist take, while also literally reflecting the existing landscape of the neighborhood. The entire 1,100-square-foot adjunct that encompasses his second story office-studio, master suite, and fort for his two young sons is swathed in mirrored siding and plate-glass windows.
Affordable, adorable, and in many cases, transportable, these tiny homes made a big impact on our readers this year.
The untreated wood will develop a silvery gray patina over time.
The shutters can be opened to allow views and cross breezes through the building.
At the north facade, a series of lapocho wood shutters mitigate solar heat gain in the summer.
The guest houses were prefabricated in a factory, trucked onto the site, and then set on concrete foundations.
The independent modular guest houses give the client the flexibility to expand in the future.
Untreated Lapacho timber planks—the same material used on the main house—clad the exterior of the two guest homes. In contrast to the horizontal cladding of the main house, the planks are vertically oriented here.
Located in the countryside in southern Uruguay, the prefabs overlook a gentle rolling landscape with eucalyptus trees, farm animals, and mountains in the far distance. The owners also have many domestic birds—including swans, peacocks, and ducks that freely roam the site.
The owners of Kew East House, a triple-story, 2,853-square-foot home in the Melbourne suburb from which it gets its name, are a couple with two teenagers who sought to maximize their wonderful, parkland views and add an internal "granny flat" on the ground floor.
Honomobo is also behind the Honomobar, a 100-square-foot mobile bar built from a recycled shipping container.
Add/Subtract House by Matt Fajkus Architecture | Photo by Charles Davis Smith
Add/Subtract House by Matt Fajkus Architecture | Photo by Charles Davis Smith

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.