683 Exterior Metal Siding Material Wood Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas - Page 5

The exterior combines recycled brick, radial sawn timber, and galvanized roof sheeting. "Materials were selected to meet the clients’ brief that the house fit within the cognitive idea of an old shed," explain the architects.
Fresh, bright, and cheery, the updated architecturally significant residence complements the couple’s modern lifestyle.
Mechanical equipment and vents are hidden in between the two peaks of the irregular sawtooth roof.
The front facade of the Sierra House mixes concrete, stone, expanded metal mesh, and wood battens.
Transparent sections of the home's facade allow daylight to filter inside.
The retreat's exterior is clad in cedar shingles to give it a tree house feel. The shingles will weather to gray over time. Dutton wanted to avoid having the cabin stand out, instead revealing itself gradually against the surrounding landscape.
EXTERIOR DRIVER SIDE
Based on Stillwater's sd-133 plan, this home has 2,300 square feet of space with dramatic ceilings (over 12 feet high) and no interior load-bearing walls. The home also features Stillwater's signature butterfly roof.
The house measures 20' x 7'.
Vertical blue-painted steel siding and horizontal cedar planks clad the exterior.
Parked in Henderson, Nevada, just outside of Las Vegas, the Blue Baloo tiny house currently serves as an AirBnB rental.
A 100-mile drive from the Big Apple, the 15-acre property in Orient, New York, serves as a vacation retreat and refuge for a Brooklyn couple.
Set on a one-acre wooded bluff overlooking Puget Sound, the Tree House is clad in low-maintenance materials including Cor-Ten steel, stained cedar shiplap, and painted HardiePlank.
For O’Reilly, paring the design back to a minimum was important from both an aesthetic and budget standpoint.
The DFAB House officially opened its doors at the end of February 2019. Construction began in 2017.
Exterior
Exterior at Dusk
Exterior Slatted Entry Volume
The ever-changing, lush wooded surroundings of Minnesota, such as those experienced at this 8,000-square-foot Type Variant House outside of Minneapolis designed by Coen and Partners, are right near the small town of New Richland.
"The wood exterior was selected to make the house blend in with the landscape," Troyer says. "I wanted something that didn’t require painting and aged in a way that would provide a degree of richness. " He envisioned a garden that better surrounded the home, and a more modern exterior. He used ash wood slates of various dimensions from Thermory USA, which were heat-treated for a more sustainable finish.
A view of the three-story DFAB House perched atop the NEST Building.
The inspiration for this prefabricated, modular family home on Fishers Island, New York, were the views that Tanney and Luntz saw from a 12-foot stepladder, which was balancing on the bed of a pickup truck when they first visited the site.
"All our products are conceived for a 'zero impact dwelling,'" says Torino, Italy-based Leap Company. "[The mountains] make the best setting to test our products and to find winning solutions to build and live in every place."
Consisting of three prefabricated units in West Seattle on a 5,000 square-foot lot, the Genesee Townhomes—by Method Homes and Chris Pardo Design—from 1,250-1,400 square feet, each with three bedrooms and two and a half bathrooms.
Specializing in high-end, energy-efficient, modern homes, Cleveland–based evoDOMUS makes only custom designs, so you can rest assured that you’re not purchasing an off-the-shelf model.
Since 2005, Turkel Design has been creating prefabricated homes with a distinctly modern, contemporary design. Their Axiom series of prefab houses, launched in 2015, offers 11 distinct designs, starting at around $800,000.
Salem, Oregon-based Ideabox approaches prefabricated homes from a modern and sustainable point of view, seeking to build prefab residences that are beautiful, efficient, and affordable. With 9 basic types that can be customized, the homes start at 400-500 square feet and reach about 1,600 square feet. Each home is built with open-web engineered trusses, insulation with high R-values, dual pane low-e windows, and EnergyStar-certified appliances.
Designed by HGA Architects and Engineers—a firm with offices in eight cities across the country, including Minneapolis—these prefab cabins were designed off-site before being transported to the park and set atop a series of concrete piers.
The gently sloping nature of the block generated a step in the house levels,  which O’Reilly used  to delineate living and sleeping zones.
The galvanized steel frames, visible from both the interior and exterior, create a repetitive rhythm along the north and south elevations.
Wood screens provide privacy to the lower level, while allowing for ventilation in this hot, humid climate.
The shell of the cabin was constructed with thin sections of hardwood, then coated with plain OSB plywood and a Tyvek air and water barrier. Metallic corrugated sheets form the outer layer.
Overall, the design strove to preserve some of the character of the original front facade while allowing a contemporary structure to unfold.
The design of the remodel negotiates a 12-foot drop from the front of the lot to the back with a modified roof form that allows for three stories.
A close-up of the brickwork which is broken up by the unique, randomized brick coursing to help blend old and new bricks.
Bricks from the original bungalow were salvaged and repurposed.
Set on a gently slope hillside, the home lies parallel with the landscape, ideally situated to take advantage of panoramic views and solar gains.
Clad in natural materials, the residence is truly at home in the Pacific Northwest. Tall glazing provides a glimpse inside, with peeks of the elegant, spiral stair.
The wood-clad home sits between tall native grasses and dense foliage.
A refined, simple exterior palette of wood, stucco, and concrete allows the true architectural form to shine and blend in with the landscape.
Standing seam siding gives a durable exterior finish, with plywood panels adding warm accents.
The 301-square-foot cabin is situated on 99 acres on Bruny Island, an island off the coast of Tasmania. For the exterior, the architects have chosen materials that "comply with the Bushfire Attack Level of 19," they explain, including bushfire resistant wood and zincalume metal. The cabin collects its own rainwater—storage tanks are underground for an uncluttered look—and the roof sports solar panels.
The front facade is an unassuming composition of dark-painted timber and privacy screening. "We thought about the idea of the house being like a quiet shadow in the foreground of the reserve," says the firm.
Made of black anodized aluminum with stainless steel hinges, the home’s warehouse-style windows are designed to withstand corrosion. No wood was used on the exterior except for the dock, called a finger pier, which allows access to the front door and the couple’s boat. The home looks out onto downtown San Francisco, with AT&T Park visible from the main deck.
TThe first modern construction in historic Hyde Park, the forward-thinking residence unabashedly volunteers a fresh point of view in the architectural dialogue of the neighborhood.
The home's dramatic eastern elevation asserts a more commanding presence with expansive glazing on both levels, boldly "opening up" to visitors and passersby.
Situated on a corner lot with two "front yards," the home is uniquely positioned to make distinctive statements from each street-facing vantage point. The home's southern entry features modest glazing and warm, cedar accents.
The home's horizontal massing, tastefully in rhythm with the neighborhood, complements the scale of existing homes in the historic enclave.
A "grand oak," one of seven mature oak trees dotted around the property, towers majestically  over the home. This tree, vehemently protected by the city, would play a prominent role in site planning.
Daniel J. Strening designed the Accessory Dwelling Unit to provide additional space for extended family. The team used a simple palette of materials and soft edges to blend the building into the landscape.
From the street, the house appears as a modest, single-family home in scale with many of the older, post-war homes which exist in the area. But upon entering the house, it’s surprisingly expansive.
The translucent, ribbed panels that form the exterior wall are manufactured in this village.
View of courtyard

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.