675 Exterior Metal Siding Material Wood Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

The power for the tiny home–on–wheels comes from a standard RV-style hookup.
Ala Köl, the most recent design imagined by Tiny House Baluchon for a couple who love to travel, is clad with black aluminum, cedar, and glass.
French builder Baluchon created Ala Köl for their clients’ life on the road.
The tiny houseboat, named Sneci, is crafted primarily from wood and aluminum.
“As an architect, I found it highly interesting to conceptualize and design a living space that has no tangible groundwork or foundations,” Bene says. “The boat gives us an opportunity to spend time, eat, drink, sleep, and awaken nearly anywhere, while blurring the boundaries between our personal selves and nature.”
“One of the most important problems we had to deal with was how we used the space available,” says Bene. “We installed a sliding door between the interior and the open rear deck, which saved a lot of space and means that the door never blocks the view or the way.”
For sleeping under the stars, two benches on the deck can be transformed into single beds and topped with mosquito netting to keep bugs at bay.
The exterior is clad in a mix of redwood and aluminum.
“One important inspiration for the overall appearance were the local fishing boats,” Bene says. “These boats have no particular designer—each owner imagines and develops their boat according to their own ideas and needs. I tried to relate to this by articulating only small, understated gestures in the boat’s styling, reminiscent of the other boats in the area.”
Architect Tamás Bene drew inspiration for the houseboat design from the lake itself, along with local fishing boats and waterside huts.
The site in Darling Point is on a winding street leading up a hill, and the new architecture is designed to express the pitched-roof language of the original terrace house. “It’s incredibly steep at the back, which means the house looks rather modest from the street front—just a pitched-roof garage and a gate,” says architect Bronwyn Litera. “At the rear facing Rushcutters Bay, however, it drops away over a height of five stories. The house is also in a heritage conservation zone, which meant that the existing roof line and chimneys needed to be retained. We worked closely with TC Build to form a ‘plan of attack,’ which involved propping the two long walls and the roof, and completely gutting the interiors.”
Casa Parasito effortlessly provides accommodations for two people in a cleverly unique location: the rooftop of a city building in San Juan, Ecuador. El Sindicato Arquitectura wanted to not only provide a home, but also contribute positively to the densification challenge that the city’s inhabitants face. The design concept hinges on an A-frame facade. Within, an interior layout is marked by a rectangular core—also the main social/living space—from which all other utilitarian spaces, such as the kitchen, dining area, bathroom, bed, work area, and storage are accessed.
High in the Colorado mountains, this completely off-grid home cleverly fuses art and functionality. Home to a young couple and their two dogs, the eye-catching dwelling showcases the impeccable craftsmanship and creative flair of its occupants. Greg and Stephanie Parham built San Juan Tiny House to include a wavy roof, an angled front prowl, barn wood siding arranged like the rays of the sun, blue ombré shakes on the rear wall, reclaimed materials throughout, and a collapsible front porch, which features a fold-up deck and fold-down awning. On the inside, clever solutions maximize square feet and storage.
The rear of the bedroom module is enclosed in timber slats for privacy. The slats allow light through the hidden windows.
After the home was assembled, a local contractor built the outdoor concrete patio and barbecue on site.
Large glazed doors slide all the way open to blur the line between indoors and out.
Located on a clearing in the woods, the Cabin in La Juanita offers a quiet escape away from the bustling downtown of José Ignacio.
The domino-like residential volumes are staggered on top of each other and feature deeply recessed checkerboard-patterned windows to reduce glare and solar gain. The pavilion is clad in cedar to complement the adjacent stone barn, as well as the property’s heirloom trees.
The pool volume features an 80' x 10' glass facade that slides open to connect the interior to the garden. “Minimizing the amount of deflection of the cantilevered roof at the sliding glass panels to a 10-millimeter max was a challenge,” say the architects. “We had to reinforce and brace the main structural beam greatly to stiffen up the roof, as well as double up our cantilevered beams.”
The structure’s “undulating belly” is exposed above the cave-like pool pavilion. The floors and outdoor paving feature locally sourced Eramosa limestone, a rock unique to Owen Sound.
The undulating wood-and-steel structure is engineered to hide a 90-foot steel structural beam that supports the cantilevered canopy and creates the illusion of a floating pavilion from the front.
The stairs lead up to a green roof that camouflages the building amidst the landscape and protects it from direct solar heat gain in the summer.
The wavy roof cradles a black steel staircase with Eramosa Stone treads that appears to levitate above the ground and leads up to the terrace.
The 338-square-foot Fold House combines a pool pavilion embedded into the hillside with a two-story guesthouse.
A simple floor plan emphasizes the rugged materiality of this elongated, cabin-style home in Valle de Bravo.
Rear View
The Western red cedar siding is covered in Cutek “Grey Mist” stain.
“It was very important to me that the cabin be low to the ground,” says Diane. “I love the forest floor and the sway of our huge ponderosas, so I wanted as little disruption of the natural ecosystem as possible—a request which our builder, Trevor, honored admirably.”
The Far Cabin by Winkelman Architecture is set on the forested coast of Maine.
The ultimate escape for forest bathing, Denmark’s Løvtag is a tree house hotel that features three cabins that embrace Scandinavian minimalism. With tree trunks intersecting the interior, large windows, and a rooftop deck, these treehouses promise to make you feel at one with nature.
Take in the Northern Lights on the Norwegian archipelago of Fleinvær, where Fordypningsrommet has four unique sleeping cabins for rent, along with other structures that house a kitchen, bath, sauna, and studio. It’s the perfect getaway for a small group, as you can rent the property (and nine structures) for a week at $4,275.
The 304-square-foot house in Queensland, Australia, is clad with steel and cedar—materials that help the home meld with the wooded landscape.
When a family in Queensland, Australia, suffered the loss of a loved one, a tiny home became their ticket to financial freedom.
Thanks to a robust solar panel array, the house is net-zero, with enough energy to charge the couple's electric car as well.
The exterior of the lower level is clad in mill-finished black steel panels, while the upper level features vertical Garapa wood siding.
The site was constrained by the root system of the mature trees, along with parking requirements, leading to a massing of two stacked boxes, with the larger upper level creating an overhang.
The 1,922-square-foot home was built on a double-wide lot that the owners purchased and subdivided with another couple.
Architects Ernesto Cragnolino and Krista Whitson designed and built an efficient four-bedroom home for their family in Austin.
The ground floor projects out from the slope and sits over the top of the concrete foundations, in which a wine cellar—accessed through a hatch in the hallway floor—is located.
The sharply angled roof balances the fragmented form of the home at the front. “We called the roof the ‘shark’s fin roof’ when we were designing it,” says Craig. “It offers a formal counterpoint to the mass of the upstairs, but uses a sharp angle to create a dynamic form as the building goes down the site.”
The home is made of 42 unique cross-laminated timber panels. The smallest panel is 450 millimeters x 1500 millimeters, and the largest panel is the entire southern wall—14.4 meters x 2.3 meters. The cantilevered ground floor at the rear of the home was made possible by the strength of these panels.
There is a play between really earthy, natural materials—which are seen in some of the cladding, tiles, and concrete work—and a very sleek, black metal aesthetic. “I have a lot of experience in commercial architecture, so I’m not scared of using more commercial, industrial materials on a residential building,” says Craig.
The Douglas fir cladding is from Abodo, and the home is the first project in New Zealand to use iron vitriol to treat timber cladding. The innovative finishing option enhances the natural qualities of the band-sawn timber, creating a striking contrast with the metal cladding.
The house fronts the street with the large top story and a sharply angled roof that defines the staircase, creating a striking form—especially at night, when it is lit up from within.
The front door is crafted from solid spotted gum hardwood, which echoes the joinery used in the interior.
The side view of the home shows its full scale, and the separation between work and life signified through different materials.
The tiny home is clad with standing-seam metal and cedar. An outdoor kitchen area on the deck provides added living space and ties the home to the natural landscape.
Tony and Charlotte Perez designed and built their own 280-square-foot home, which features an expansive deck off of the front facade.
The cabin decks all face either expansive views of the ocean or the magical forest of fir trees.
Saltwater Farm is situated on the shoreline of San Juan Island, which is only accessible via sea or air.
All the wood used for the front porch siding, decking, and furniture came from trees harvested from the land and milled/cured on the property.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.