98 Exterior Metal Siding Material Stone Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

Exterior Side View with Outdoor Pool and Patio
During the renovation, Chu extended the bathroom next to the master bedroom outwards to create a bath and shower room that blurs the boundaries between interior and exterior. He also added a skylight made from a repurposed car sunroof, which was purchased secondhand for $100 and could be operated by remote control to easily let the elements in. “There were many challenges in what we wanted to do,” says Chu. “Then, we searched for materials and ways of doing that—or we let the site inspire us.”
The sliding front door is made of glass panels, and its bright red color was inspired by the red doors (symbolic of fortune and prosperity) found in traditional villages in Taiwan. “We wanted the front door to be transparent so that light filters into the interior even when the door is closed,” says Chu. “It was very important to have a constant relationship between inside and outside.”
Tapped by art collectors to design an inspirational residence in rural Montana, Jackson Hole–based Carney Logan Burke Architects crafted a modern house that frames the property’s extraordinary landscape views.
Lago Vista by Dick Clark + Associates
Casey Brown Architecture designed the Hart House, a modern update to the one-room Australian beach shack that overlooks Great Mackerel Beach. The contemporary home mimics the shack vernacular with its simple, boxy construction that’s wrapped in a protective shell of corrugated metal.
The night pavilion is reflected in the infinity hot tub.
The home is constructed atop a plinth made of local granite.
The cantilevered living room is hung from the roof and features large glazed walls that overlook the surrounding landscape.
The traditional forms of Smith House are inspired by the local vernacular buildings but made modern through their cladding, fenestration, and minimalist detailing.
Taula House by M Gooden Design  |  Entry
Taula House by M Gooden Design  |  Exterior // Approach
A look at the home's front facade. In a Melbourne suburb, Splinter Society Architecture designed the versatile home for Mark and Cara Harbottle and their three young children.
A service yard is discreetly concealed behind a concrete screen. What appears as a series of concrete blocks opens up and becomes completely transparent on the hillside. It's all about embracing the views, the setting, and the climate.
The architects took advantage of the uneven site and nestled the home into the landscape, providing opportunity for a series of stacked volumes with different uses.
The original home had been built into the hillside, and the firm kept that basic exterior form. The exterior door seen here accesses the separate en-suite room that can be used as a bedroom, storage, or flex space.
From the front, Greg Hoffman and Kirsten Brady’s home in Portland, Oregon, bears little resemblance to the daylight ranch house that once stood in its place. Yet upon closer inspection, it is clear that the enlarged structure is actually an updated version of the same dwelling that has occupied the site since the early 1950s. More windows, a trellised roofline, a basalt privacy wall, and a flat-roofed, top-floor addition are among the most striking changes. Plantings were also added to enhance the yard. “There was zero landscaping,” says Greg, “If you look at the original photos, the house was just sitting on the ground.” All of the new features are carefully oriented so that the sightline from the street through the house to the vista beyond remains open. “The original house had a gap in the hedge so people could see the view,” Greg recalls. “We said, ‘Let’s keep that.’”
The firm added a 60-square-meter annex to the existing 88-square-meter stone building to fashion a residence that’s now about 148 square meters (or around 1,500 square feet).
The two-story annex is clad in charcoal corrugated steel for contrast with the granite stone and tucked under the rebuilt tile roofline. "In materiality, the new and old were distinguished, sheltered under the same roof: the stone and the corrugated sheet, side-by-side and in continuity," says the firm.
The home is located on the bank of the historic National 18 road with a view of the Serra da Estrela mountains.
The native plantings in the courtyard, which is enclosed by a wall for privacy in the suburban setting, visually link it to the established eucalyptus trees at the front and rear of the property. The home’s dark cladding is accented by rose gold stainless steel panels.
The home's sloping roofline sweeps upward from an enclosed courtyard. The character of the house changes as light hits the mix of materials—from rough stone to sleek black aluminum—throughout the day, giving it a sense of constant motion.
Another view of the monolithic stones that flank each side of the main entrance. Ribbons of black aluminum on the streetside facade appear to seamlessly twist as they reveal windows and offer a peek of greenery.
In order to achieve a contemporary exterior while still keeping a feeling of warmth, Martin Gomez Arquitectos chose to use dark metal, black flagstone, and lapacho wood as cladding.
A look at the elevated west wall and entry. Here, insulated black panels spaced in glass cladding guard the home against harmful weather while reflecting beautiful silhouettes of the garden.
The beach shack's corrugated metal shell is detailed with curved edges. The building faces northeast to take advantage of ample sunlight and ocean views.
Mechanical equipment and vents are hidden in between the two peaks of the irregular sawtooth roof.
The front facade of the Sierra House mixes concrete, stone, expanded metal mesh, and wood battens.
Transparent sections of the home's facade allow daylight to filter inside.
Herzog + de Meuron used a variety of industrial materials throughout Dominus Estate. After ascending the stairwell to the second level, one is met by brutalist, concrete floors, a wire-mesh ceiling, floor-to-ceiling glass, and sunlight that shines through the gabions. A varnished-wood handrail contrasts with the metal, stone, and glass, adding warmth to the otherwise cool setting.
The Art Tower Mito in Ibaraki, Japan
A long bluestone roof deck overlooks the pool and the expansive lawn.
The midcentury modern home is located on 1.7 acres of land and features bluestone terraces, fieldstone walls, and elevated views of the countryside.
Working with a sumptuous material palette, Ehrlich Yanai Rhee Chaney Architects designed a sprawling new residence in Palo Alto for Mark and Laura Pine. The teak wood and handmade Danish bricks that define the exterior are used inside as well; distressed stainless steel panels by Chris French Metal sheathe one side of the upper volume. Blasen Landscape Architecture chose Peruvian feather grass to flank the entrance walkway.
Roof scupper detail
The home is concealed behind horizontal bands of materials including Aji stone quarried from Shikoku, a powder-coated aluminum screen (lath), the white plaster exterior of the second floor, and a titanium zinc alloy roof.
La Vinya, PGA Golf Resort | Studio RHE
La Vinya, PGA Golf Resort | Studio RHE
front elevation - towards south
front elevation towards south....
At night, the exterior sculptures take on a dramatic appearance.  The home appears as a sculpture in itself, filled with colorful pieces to admire.
The second guest suite, clad in cedar and aluminum, extends over a horizontal limestone wall.
Dramatic in its horizontal expression, this private residence appears to extend into the landscape via deep overhangs and visual transparency.
The futuristic residence is defined by its natural topography emerging from the landscape, yet partially embedded within it.
To minimize water use, SCDA and Strata Landscape Architecture designed a native, drought-resistant planting plan with sensor-controlled drip irrigation. The lawn takes up less than 10% of the landscape.
Vertical planks of western red cedar provide a warm contrast against horizontal zinc siding panels.
The spacious second-story terrace projects toward the south to overlook views of the meadow.
A glimpse of the master bedroom framed with full-height windows and sheltered by a deep roof overhang.
The modern Montana home is nestled into a transitional zone between a forested butte and a grassy meadow in the western part of the state.
 A garage and gym are contained within the lowest level of the house.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.