95 Exterior Metal Siding Material Gable Roofline Design Photos And Ideas

The home is perched beside a two-acre reservoir, a favorite spot for bird watching.
The house has a high-pitched, gabled roof.
Because the area lacks distinctive natural features, House 3000 has quickly become a landmark that helps orientate visitors to the site.
Passive design principles were utilized in the siting of the highly-insulated cabin. Deep eaves protect the interior from hot summer sun, while a verandah overhang optimizes solar gains in winter.
The exterior combines recycled brick, radial sawn timber, and galvanized roof sheeting. "Materials were selected to meet the clients’ brief that the house fit within the cognitive idea of an old shed," explain the architects.
The clients requested the design of the cabin and shed to appear as if the buildings had been weathering over time with the site.
view to mudroom from landscape stair
The dark and gabled addition offers sharp contrast against the low-lying white-painted bungalow. Elements such as the steel pillars were repeated in both structures for continuity.
LOHA’s design is a result of new code requirements and creatively working within limitations so that the project would successfully maximize the site potential.
Standing-seam siding folds up from the street façade over the roofline to the roof deck, creating a seamless transition between wall and roof.
The cabin is composed of six prefabricated modules placed side by side atop a six-meter long iron frame.
On the first floor of Casa R is a woodshed and a "chiflonera." This area between the interiors and exteriors is commonly found in Chilean/Patagonian homes, as it helps to regulate the region’s extreme temperature changes.
The 500-square-foot cabin and adjacent shed are 100 percent off-grid, with water, sewer, and electrical systems in place to support these buildings and any future development.
Lagos has raised the cabin above the ground on supporting steel to avoid damaging any of the existing trees on site.
The home is spread across two floors.
The wraparound deck boasts a view of the surroundings with shade provided by the eaves of the roof.
The  main house was given a contemporary look by way of a metal roof and a black exterior.
The slightly trapezoidal shape of the site provides a rare opportunity for views down the coast from the interior of the house.
Strategically placed openings on all sides of the façade secure the ocean and hillside views, and provide maximal natural light to all interior spaces.
Corrosive sea air can deteriorate metals and slowly peel away paint, so the architects wrapped the building in aluminum and a non-corrosive metal, and coated it in a resilient rustproof paint.
Recycled and repurposed items, such as salvaged bricks and a stainless steel bench from a commercial kitchen, have been used to create a low maintenance and sustainable home.
"We liked the idea of capturing the informality of a holiday place—nothing precious, all simple and practical," explain the architects.
The tapered limestone chimney draws inspiration from an existing shed built of dry-stacked local stone.
"The porch’s distinctive 30-foot peak is discernible from a great distance, and its rhythmic, horizontal cypress slats are a contemporary interpretation of traditional vented gables," add the architects.
A waste-management plan has been developed to minimize, mitigate, and/or completely eliminate construction waste, while also properly disposing unused materials.
"Working within the restrictive budget, design was not sacrificed; rather, it inspired the team to find a vocabulary that was simple yet refined," adds the firm. "The exterior of the home is defined by clean lines, a sculptural gable roof, and a contrasting material palette of corrugated-aluminum and warm, locally sourced cypress. "
The gabled addition is topped with a standing seam metal roof and is clad in vertical corrugated metal siding.
A study is placed on the street-facing side of the addition.
Red ALPOLIC aluminum composite panels have been used for the exterior cladding.
The north-end of the cabin features an outdoor deck.
The prefab cabin is elevated atop six metal pillars to minimize site impact.
The prefab cabin is a 40-minute hike from Kandalaksha.
Energy-efficient VELUX windows have been installed in the south-facing glazed wall.
The sheet metal roof and wood cladding of the new structure complements the smooth, shiny birch tree barks on the site.
In winter, the extension looks as if it’s covered in snow.
The ribbed texture of the facade echoes the whitewashed walls of the area’s rural barns.
The new addition consists of a white prism that rests atop a concrete pedestal.
The family wanted a room on the main floor that could serve as an office and playroom. They also desired their home to include two sleeping lofts, rather than just one.
The profile is also a reference to rural sheds common throughout the countryside.
Naturally rusted steel sheathes the cabins that Malek Alqadi built on a 1954 homestead outside Joshua Tree National Park. “I loved the idea of stitching the existing structure back together, reinforcing it, and giving it life again without compromising the beautiful setting it’s in,” he says.
Instead of installing rooftop solar panels, Alqadi and his friend and partner in the venture, Hillary Flur, built a “solar tree” to provide energy.
The void between the cabins was an integral part of Alqadi’s vision for a retreat that fosters communion with the environment. A ladder affixed to the side of the smaller cabin leads to the stargazing portal. Electromagnetic shutters are operated via an iPad.
“There’s a presence to that place—it’s vast, and constantly shifting,” Moffitt says. “It was clear that this house should be an observation shed for the changing landscape beyond.”
On the northwestern tip of Scotland’s Isle of Skye is a vacation rental that's inspired by the region’s traditional “crofter style” cottages, but covered with a skin of tin.  
Designed and built by Gill Smith and Alan Dickson of Scottish practice Rural Design Architects, this house sits along the rugged Isle of Skye coast and has a rudimentary form that recalls children’s drawings of pitched-roof homes.  
Smith and Dickson constructed the house using corrugated metal sheeting, which is commonly used for agricultural sheds or
The north wall of the IST home functions as a cut-away, offering a peek inside an efficient yet cozy dwelling. Architect Peter Jurkovič built the home for a woman who had sold her flat in the big city of Bratislava and wanted something that reminded her of the village life of her childhood.
A bothy is a small Scottish laborer’s hut or mountain refuge.
The bothy was designed as low-impact architecture, meant to enhance the experience of spending time in nature.
The bothy was designed as low-impact architecture, meant to enhance the experience of spending time in nature.
The Bothy can be installed on site in just a number of hours.
The Bothy’s clean outline conceals a drainage system and 10cm of wood-fiber insulation.
The Bothy has a fully insulated envelope and is double glazed.
With an internal space of 132 square feet and a 18' x 9.8' footprint, the Artist Bothy is constructed from cross-laminated timber panels clad in Corten corrugated metal and Scottish larch.
The Bothy Project's original design located in the Cairngorms National Park.
The gabled roof on Enough House puts it in conversation with the adjacent Troop barn and Cheboque schoolhouse, but its Cor-Ten steel exterior makes it a unique addition to Shobac.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.