426 Exterior Metal Siding Material Flat Roofline Design Photos And Ideas

Circulation platforms weave above the open courtyard space.
NOEM, a Barcelona–based architecture firm, created a metal-clad house for a young client just outside Madrid. It’s raised 12 feet off the ground to offer better views of the landscape, lending it "the futuristic feeling that it just landed," says Pol Guiu, one of NOEM’s cofounders.
The front facade upcycles wood from the pallets used to ship in the cabinets.
The two units in the duplex share a wall in the main house, so Rios continued the mirrored effect by placing the shipping containers side by side about 10 feet away from the home. Cut into the sides, the windows allow natural light to illuminate the shipping container and are designed to give parents a view of the kids playing in the backyard.
Rios asked architect Reynolds to derive a design from the shipping containers. The duplex takes the shape of stacked volumes clad with vertical and horizontal Hardie boards. The covered patio features clear-coated cedar wood.
The modular appearance of the duplex, clad in white Hardie plank siding, mimics the look of a two-story container home. With large windows and 11-foot-tall ceilings, the two-bedroom, three-bath residence feels more spacious than its 1,484 square feet. On the ground floor, the living, dining, and kitchen areas flow into one another; potential guests in the shipping container also have easy access to a full bath of their own. A steel-and-wood floating staircase leads to the second floor, which holds two bedrooms with patio access.
In order to maximize space, the architects utilized a split-level design that includes the living areas on the main level, two upstairs bedrooms, and a walk-out basement beneath the dining room. The wood siding was salvaged and restored from the previous building on-site, in order to bring warmth to the gray, seamed metal and reference the neighborhood's past.
Designed by Szu-Ping Patricia Chen Suchart and Thamarit Suchart of Chen + Suchart Studio, the Staab residence stands in stark contrast to its suburban context but in harmony with the Sonoran Desert.
This 1,000 square-foot weekend cabin in Mazama, Washington, is essentially a "steel box on stilts," according to the firm. The three-story structure, which includes a living room and kitchen, can be completely shuttered when the owner is away.
Delta Shelter, a cabin getaway on the same property as the Rolling Huts. We visited the owner and his wife during one of our visits to get an in-person reference for Tanner Construction. It was wonderful to see the house in person after drooling over it in the pages of Tom Kundig: Houses. Photo by Tim Bies.
This 191-square-foot cabin near Vancouver and its glass facades "forces you to engage with the bigger landscape," architect Tom Kundig says, but it seals up tight when its owner is away. The unfinished steel cladding slides over the windows, turning it into a protected bunker. Read the full story here.
A standing-seam steel roofing panel clads a portion of the exterior, while the aluminum pipes also serve as the railing for the roof deck. The family cooks all their meals at the fire pit outside.
Short StackA tiny cabin in the Wisconsin Woods makes a big impact with Johnsen & Schmaling's innovative stacked design. The resulting cozy abode is stylish and durable, with stunning views of the surrounding landscape.
Olson Kundig Architects' Delta Shelter, in Mazama, Washington, is a 1,000 square-foot steel box home with a 200 square-foot footprint. Photo by Olson Sundberg Kundig Allen Architects/TASCHEN.
Project Name: Dietert Ranch
When Brill purchased his residence, a onetime warehouse for mid-century lighting fixtures, it was subdivided. He and architect Tony Unruh gutted the 1,800-square-foot building completely and created an open floor plan for Brill's living areas and practice space.
This Beverly Hills kitHAUS is comprised of modernist prefab modules that can accommodate a variety of uses: from yoga studios to home offices, and from weekend retreats to pop-up kiosks and guest rooms.
The second guest suite, clad in cedar and aluminum, extends over a horizontal limestone wall.
Dramatic in its horizontal expression, this private residence appears to extend into the landscape via deep overhangs and visual transparency.
The futuristic residence is defined by its natural topography emerging from the landscape, yet partially embedded within it.
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The home at dusk.
The façade juxtaposes the rich oxidized patina of Cor-ten steel with the deep, earthy tones of reclaimed redwood beams.
The entrance of the home stands out against the blue California sky.
The hillside home is nestled into its surroundings and enjoys breathtaking views of Mt. Diablo.
Pathways meander around the property, which is filled with oak and fruit trees. In fact, the expansive, gently sloped hillside would be an ideal spot for a future vineyard or olive trees grove.
The deceptively simple design makes it a well-recognized masterpiece of midcentury design.
Nestled into its Laurel Canyon location, the home overlooks a shallow rectangular pool.
Tim Sharpe and Rani Blancpain wanted a home that would allow them to enjoy an indoor-outdoor lifestyle.
The roof is standing-seam galvanized metal and the siding is Thermory driftwood.
"The most challenging part of the project was the fact that the foundation started 25 feet in the air. Until the foundation was built, every piece of material needed to be rigged into place via ropes, chains, and cables," Will says.
Elevated above a spring-fed creek, Yoki draws inspiration from the "healing powers of water."
Recently featured in the pages of Dwell Magazine, this contemporary home is built from five reclaimed shipping containers and is set into a lush Santa Barbara hillside.
Flooded with natural light, Makers Row is a new mixed-use building in Northeast Portland that combines 19 apartments with ground-floor commercial space in a highly energy-efficient envelope.
Clear Rock Lookout seen at dusk.
The home's main entry—two levels off the street—forces guests to get intimately acquainted with the steep topography of the site. Although the home's residents have the option to enter via garage and interior stair, guests instead travel up exterior stairs at the corner of the site, passing the planted neighboring lot to reach the home's front door.
Earthy, organic materials were favored for the home's composition. The exterior palette features Pietra Serena limestone, color-integral stucco, metal panels, and stained cedar.
Materials used for the exterior include stucco, wood, metal, and concrete.
Lemmo Architecture and Design received a 2017 AIA Austin award for the Clear Rock Lookout, one of their first commissions.
A low-impact design approach informed the compact, elevated footprint and grated metal walkways. Rainwater is channeled from the roof (covered in local stone) into a rain barrel.
"The modern form contrasts with the Hill Country vernacular used on the rest of the 1,000-acre West Texas ranch," notes the firm.
In contrast to the glazed writer's studio, the hunting blind is punctuated by two thin windows.
Fronted with full-height, double-glazed openings, the studio frames east-facing views of the creek-bed and beyond.
A view of the home at night.
Gregory Creek Residence - Exterior
Evening at Gregory Creek
In good weather, the owners can open up the exterior glass walls.
Entry to the house is accessed via the gravel arrival court. A floating ledge bridges to the front door, which is located in a "glazed volume set between two of the buildings," said the architects.
The project recently won a Gold Pin in the 2018 Best Design Awards. The judges were impressed with how “the residence settles completely and utterly into its location with exceptional detail, and a sensitivity that responds to its changing environment through the seasons.”
The board-formed concrete, steel, and teak over a rainscreen system blend the building into the site.
Surrounded by rugged beauty, the home was designed with a faceted exterior optimized for wraparound views unique in each room.
This custom residence for actor Will Arnett was inspired by LivingHomes' RK2 model. About a third was built on-site, including a glass staircase tower and a guest wing (featuring a recording booth where Will can ply his trademark baritone).
To minimize water use, SCDA and Strata Landscape Architecture designed a native, drought-resistant planting plan with sensor-controlled drip irrigation. The lawn takes up less than 10% of the landscape.
Vertical planks of western red cedar provide a warm contrast against horizontal zinc siding panels.
main road
facade materials
The fourth floor connects to an outdoor dining area and garden space.
A collage of brightly colored, geometric volumes comprise the Ettore Sottsass–designed residence of Lesley Bailey and Adrian Olabuenaga, proprietors of jewelry and accessories company ACME Studio. Completed in 1997, this home is one of few private commissions designed by the Italian architect, who passed away in 2007.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.