880 Exterior Metal Siding Material Flat Roofline Design Photos And Ideas

This Beverly Hills kitHAUS is comprised of modernist prefab modules that can accommodate a variety of uses: from yoga studios to home offices, and from weekend retreats to pop-up kiosks and guest rooms.
Owner Stacey Hill was instantly drawn to this shipping container’s existing blue color and chose to leave it unchanged. Architect Jim Poteet added floor-to-ceiling sliding doors to allow light in, as well as a cantilevered overhang to shade a window on the left side, which houses a small garden storage area.
Inspired by LivingHomes’ RK2 model, this custom prefab-hybrid home in Beverly Hills, Los Angeles, was made for actor Will Arnett by Plant Prefab.
Transforming shipping containers into habitable spaces is a growingly popular subset of prefab. Just off the Delaware River in Pennsylvania, Martha Moseley and Bill Mathesius adapted an unused concrete foundation to create a home made from 11 stacked shipping containers. "We were inspired by the site, and our desire to have something cool and different," says Moseley.
Located at The Proxy in Hayes Valley, San Francisco, AETHERsf is a concept space constructed from three 40-foot shipping containers stacked on top of each other. In addition to a curated selection of design-focused outerwear, the space features a custom, glass-encased cantilevered lounge with reclaimed oak floors and a belt-driven "dry cleaner-style" conveyor system.
Australia-based firm Contained specializes in transforming cargo vessels into well-designed lodgings. Each 20-foot shipping container easily opens up, flips out, and unfolds into a luxurious hotel room.
Made of two 40-foot-long shipping containers that are offset from one another, the Model 6 by IndieDwell offers 640 square feet of living space.
The H4 is HONOMOBO’s most efficient shipping container home. At just over 700 square feet, the home has two bedrooms, a living room, a dining room, a full kitchen, and one bathroom.
For Bret and Dani Stone’s house in Santa Barbara, California, Barber Builders erected a concrete-and-steel ground level capable of supporting a second story made mostly of shipping containers. While the project as a whole took 19 months, the containers were craned into place in a single day in 2016.
In addition to opening House Tokyo up to natural light, the large windows break up the corrugated metal facade.
Maximizing a 280-square-foot plot, House Tokyo by Unemori Architects makes clever use of ceiling heights and half levels.
“By using a hybrid model that includes both prefab and site-built construction, we were able to push the architectural vocabulary of prefab construction beyond the expected, with a bold, new visual vocabulary,” Denton says.
“We didn’t want to wedge something into the site that was out of scale—everything had to just slot in,” says architect Jason Kerwin.
Expansive glass walls were paired with a Corten Steel frame to maximize the yard's garden views.
In the corner, framed, machine-sewn vintage fabrics serve as minimalist wall decor. The artwork is the creation of delavegacanolasso and is available for sale on the firm's website.
The interiors are lined with OSB Poplar wood, and insulated with 12cm of recycled cotton.
Architects Delavegacanolasso expand a client’s work-from-home office space by adding a Cor-Ten steel prefab to the backyard.
Outside, a large 15-foot awning allows the family to enjoy outdoor living.
The exterior of the chassis was brought back to life with a fresh coat of paint in a blue-gray hue inspired by Mercedes-Benz Sprinter vans.
The 34-foot-long Airstream Excella was gutted and renovated by Innovative Spaces in Santa Barbara, California.
The tiny houseboat, named Sneci, is crafted primarily from wood and aluminum.
“As an architect, I found it highly interesting to conceptualize and design a living space that has no tangible groundwork or foundations,” Bene says. “The boat gives us an opportunity to spend time, eat, drink, sleep, and awaken nearly anywhere, while blurring the boundaries between our personal selves and nature.”
“One of the most important problems we had to deal with was how we used the space available,” says Bene. “We installed a sliding door between the interior and the open rear deck, which saved a lot of space and means that the door never blocks the view or the way.”
For sleeping under the stars, two benches on the deck can be transformed into single beds and topped with mosquito netting to keep bugs at bay.
The exterior is clad in a mix of redwood and aluminum.
“One important inspiration for the overall appearance were the local fishing boats,” Bene says. “These boats have no particular designer—each owner imagines and develops their boat according to their own ideas and needs. I tried to relate to this by articulating only small, understated gestures in the boat’s styling, reminiscent of the other boats in the area.”
Architect Tamás Bene drew inspiration for the houseboat design from the lake itself, along with local fishing boats and waterside huts.
“The screens bring an extra detail that contrasts with the simple geometry of the building,” explains architect  Thomas Bercy.
“Courtyards are a fantastic way of controlling the sun here,” says architect Cavin Costello. “We live outdoors primarily in the late fall/winter, when the sun angle is very low, and tall walls are often more effective than roofs in providing shade for the outdoor spaces.”
The corrugated steel siding and roof reflect the radiant heat from the desert sun.
The three volumes of the home are defined by different materials, so they are both visually and functionally separate. The glazed “connectors” between the volumes are grounded by a large steel beam that runs across the top.
The entrance to home is defined by two Foo dogs, which are feng shui symbols of protection—and these dogs also give the home its name. The board-formed concrete of the main living wing has been left as is, creating a play of constantly changing shadows. Over time, weather will naturally soften these joints, and the look of the home will subtly evolve.
Winkelman Architecture delivers grown-up summer-camp vibes with this unassuming retreat on the coast of Maine.
Inspired by ancient ruins, Frankie Pappas crafts a green-roofed, brick guesthouse that connects deeply with nature in the South African Bushveld.
At night, it is easy to see how the volume at the north end of the site is stacked with the library and a private deck above, and the en suite guest bedroom below. This is separated from the rest of the living space by the open garage, offering increased privacy.
The modularity of the home’s construction is referenced in the grid-like windows. These large areas of glazing allow the home to be filled with natural light.
A concrete block tower in the garden beside the home contains a water tank and solar heating boiler with a shower below.
The metal roof and external walls are constructed from double-layered metallic roofing tiles, which were chosen for their durability against the elements.
The home requires very little maintenance and features a lightweight construction. The modularity of the design also helped to avoid excessive material waste during construction.
The site is a generous lot at an estate in Cotia, on the outskirts of São Paulo—an area that has plenty of greenery. Part of the concept for the home was to replace some of the existing exotic trees with native plants.
The clients are a husband and wife with grown children who no longer live at home. The husband is a psychoanalyst, and the wife is a history teacher at a middle school in São Paulo. During construction of the home, very little earthwork was needed, as the residence nestles into the sloped site to preserve the flat part of the site for a garden of native trees and shrubs.
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The three buildings are strategically organized around a central courtyard, creating an outdoor room that is protected from sun, precipitation, and wind. The openings between the buildings frame the predominant views.
Grasses, shrubs, and flowers surround the building, making it appear as if it grew out of the landscape, rather than being placed in it. Pavers in the grasses weave between the recreation locker building and the main residence to the central courtyard, which is situated under a canopy.
The home is designed to respond directly to the site and its climate. The overhangs block out unwanted summer solar heat gain and welcome in warming winter sunlight. The architects decided to allow more winter light in as an assurance that the home will remain above freezing in the long months when the owner might not be there.
The elevated canopy above the three volumes not only protects the courtyard from the elements, but hierarchically demarcates this outdoor living area as the most important space in the structure.
The home is known as “Boar Shoat”—a reference to a young hog who is full of energy and life. “The term was used by the owner’s family when he was growing up to describe youthful vivacity,” says architect Hunter Gundersen.
The dwelling is located on the hill’s brow, so it nestles into the slope just below a prominent cluster of quaking aspens where a resident bull moose lives. “The lot is located in a sea of grass-covered hills,” says architect Hunter Gundersen. “Unlike much of the Rocky Mountains it isn’t a craggy landscape full of cliffs, ravines, and broken rock faces. Instead, it’s soft and rolling, like grassy ocean swells with an occasional rock-outcropping ship or tree-stand island. Like the outcroppings, the structure is low lying, dark, and embedded into the grass and sage—at home on the soft surface, but not apologetic nor blending in.”
“The owner was looking for a place to unplug from the everyday frenzy and spend time reconnecting with what mattered to him most—family, close friends, good food, and nature,” says architect Hunter Gundersen. “He requested that the retreat be simple in order to not detract from its landscape nor its purpose. To that end, he also requested that the dwelling be as low maintenance as possible.”
The ultra-modern, glass-and-steel back facade now "acts as an oversized southern aperture and fully retractable gateway" for the home, says Hackett.
The home’s rusted Cor-Ten steel facade is set over structural insulated metal stud panel framing.
"Some of my favorite elements are the reclaimed Wyoming fence wood siding and cedar tongue and groove ceilings," reveals Mackay. "The use of reclaimed wood is pretty unique."
"At Wheelhaus, our priorities are durability, efficient use of space, and sustainability—and we provide all of that along with modern and innovative design," says Mackay. "We focus on energy efficiency, progressive space management, and top-of-the-line building materials."
The outdoor deck seamlessly extends out from the living room, allowing residents to expand the living space outdoors in warmer months. The canopy protects the deck from sun and rain.
Road-Haus can be placed nearly anywhere recreational vehicles or trailers can. "To install Road-Haus, you will need a water line, sewer connection line, and 100 amp service for power within 20 feet of the unit," says Wheelhaus founder Jamie Mackay.
Secret passageways and surprise design elements abound in this playful home renovation for an active family of five.
The Lookout occupies the alley side of the lot. “It’s a white box hovering above all of the visual noise of the alley,” says Humble. “We [located] the circulation to that side, and have all of our primary openings facing away from the alley toward the tree.”
David has built a number of screens and fences around the two cabins to increase privacy. "We now have a good feel of rustic isolation," says Diane.
The logs stacked between trees give the cabin a wood supply for the wood burning stove which can heat the whole place in winter and cuts down on electricity. "The guys are out chopping and splitting wood every visit," says Diane.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.