794 Exterior Metal Siding Material Flat Roofline Design Photos And Ideas

The tiny home is clad with standing-seam metal and cedar. An outdoor kitchen area on the deck provides added living space and ties the home to the natural landscape.
Tony and Charlotte Perez designed and built their own 280-square-foot home, which features an expansive deck off of the front facade.
The glass-backed home illuminated at night.
The ultra-modern, glass-and-steel back facade now "acts as an oversized southern aperture and fully retractable gateway" for the home, says Hackett.
The ground-floor living space looks inward to the courtyard and is protected on all other sides by the mass of the building and the blank brick facade.
A side patio leads from the front of the home to the courtyard. The same red bricks used for the facade have been used for the paving to create a seamless fabric that wraps the built form and the site.
The slim profile of the red bricks used in the facade creates a textured surface across the monolithic form, while red and brown tones of each brick create an organic, varied pattern of color.
The entire home is wrapped in a brick "skin" that extends onto the ground at the front and sides of the home. The entrance is found through a simple void in the facade beside a pond with floating vegetation that hints at the verdant interior.
The Buhaus includes a living/sleeping area with a kitchenette, a bathroom, and an outdoor deck. Each unit can be completed within three to four months.
“The void in the veranda and deck creates a spectacular shaft of light that cuts across the shiny aluminum surface, reflecting rippled patterns into the house,” adds Mulla.
The young lancewoods in the sunken garden to the right of the deck are among Mulla’s favorite features of the home. “They will eventually grow through an opening through the roof and add to the light display.”
The metallic skin and white surfaces amplify the home’s radiant golden glow—even at night.
The new west-facing extension is wrapped in a mill-finished aluminum skin that changes color throughout the day and seasons. In the summer, the silver facade reflects a rose-colored glow, and in winter it shines a cool blue.
Vitex decking by Rosenfeld Kidson lines the L-shaped deck.
The deep roof overhang provides protection from the sun and bounces reflected yellow light from the floor.
Glazed doors slide open to seamlessly connect the living spaces with the outdoors.
A view of the parklike retreat from the backyard pool shows how the glass-enclosed entryway connects the living and sleeping areas.
"The use of materials, the careful details, the integrated sense of place, the weaving together of inside and out, and creating a special home that the clients love make this a special story for me," Epstein notes fondly.
As night falls, the home lights up like a lantern, enhancing the warm glow of the wood ceiling. Immense clerestory windows and glass sliders connect the home to the outdoors.
Built to commune with its scenic surroundings, this sustainable home embodies understated luxury.
The all-glass room provides views of the neighboring lake.
Metal details accent the home’s pared-down material palette.
A perforated metal screen allows the family to “see people on the street—but they can’t see the other direction into the house,” Lazor says.
The steel bridge—which echoes the design language of the steel brise soleil—extends from the second-floor study into the rear garden.
The deep brise soleil shades the interior as well and offers privacy from neighboring buildings without compromising the views.
Both the boys' bedroom and family room spill out into the ground floor garden, providing the children with an expanded play area outside of the house.
The two monolithic walls on the north and south sides are integrally colored, steel-troweled plaster. They anchor the home in its site as well as provide privacy from neighboring homes.
The home has large areas of glazing on the east and west facades. Given the small footprint of the home and the open floor plan, the entire interior experiences direct light in the morning and evening.
There is now continuous, stepped landscaping from one home to the next as the buildings and street rise up the hillside.
“Every single part of the Living Vehicle design and engineering is completely new for 2020,” says Matthew. “It has a 100% aluminum structure, frame, and floor—with no wood products part of the structural system. It also has outstanding insulation design, with extensive thermal testing for very hot and very cold travel.” The Living Vehicle is wrapped in anodized, marine-grade aluminum that is highly weather-, water-, and scratch-resistant.
When envisioning the perfect home for their family, Kiley and Jim agreed that accessibility was paramount—access to the outdoors, and access for their daughters, Langley and Boelyn, who have special needs and rely on their wheelchairs to get around. After purchasing a narrow lot in Downers Grove, Illinois, the couple reached out to Chicago-based firm Kuklinski + Rappe Architects to design a residence that would serve their daughters, their son Huck, and their own various needs. Crafted to adapt to the family's lifestyle over the years, the home will provide lifelong health and happiness.
Gabions and loose stone create walkable pervious surfaces.
Designed for year-round use, the Rocky Brook weeHouse features covered and exposed spaces for enjoying the outdoors.
To minimize energy use, the residence relies on natural ventilation for cooling. Heat is provided by an inflow hydronic tubing system. Note the guesthouse seen behind the bridge.
The clients encouraged the development of hemlock trees, which grow from the creek to the building site. They create a beautiful backdrop for the second story of the main building and deck overtop the master bedroom.
The home is clad in corrugated Cor-ten steel siding selected for its durability and ability to blend the home into its natural surroundings over time.
Located two hours north of Boston, the Rocky Brook weeHouse is carved out of the grade of a steep creekside lot.
Architect Eric Logan took minimalism to the max when he rebuilt his family cabin on a Wyoming mountainside.
Walls of glass, horizontal roof planes, and a natural material palette enable this expansive home to feel like an extension of a dramatic boulder-strewn landscape in Idaho.
Amagansett Modular House by MB Architecture
A timber boardwalk through the veld grass leads to a 15-meter, reed-filtration lap pool.
"Wendy and Lukas were looking for a natural, sporty lifestyle and a sustainably designed home," says Daffonchio. "It is always rewarding to see the owners living the lifestyle they had dreamed, and seeing their joy in living the home and its incredible surroundings."
Monaghan Farm is a 1,300-acre eco-estate about an hour north of the center of Johannesburg. The architectural and environmental guidelines for the estate outline that only 3% of the land will ever be built on.
In the evening, the slats reveal a glow from within, giving the project its name, Lantern Studio.
The screen stops short of the frame’s end. “We wanted to peel it back, so you could see the steel beneath,” says Flavin.
A Cor-Ten steel planter running along one side is filled with Carex Ice Dance. “The plantings are minimalist, yet rich in color and texture,” says landscape architect H. Keith Wagner. The wood planters on the top level were custom designed by Kelton Woodwork.
The mezzanine has rooftop access through large, south-oriented glazed doors. A steel awning offers shade to the mezzanine level during summer months, and the inside face is clad with plywood to visually extend the interior space outward.
As well as a sequence of innovative country houses, Peter Foggo and David Thomas complete a number of residences in Wimbledon. The most accomplished of these was this project, completed in 1963, sitting on a street of traditional and substantial period dwellings, mostly in brick. Foggo & Thomas’ house, in contrast, is both low slung and distinctly modern. Its structural framework is provided by a combination of concrete trusses that span the flat-roofed house, forming a series of spider leg ‘bridges,’ working in concert with a linear and lighter steel frame.
The mostly blank brick-clad exterior belies the complex geometries that inform the multilevel plan inside. The windows are arranged to frame specific views—including the steeple of the nearby St. Michael’s Church—while retaining privacy from the street.
The firm worked with landscape design company Alchemie to plan the landscaping and create a variety of seating areas throughout the property.
The addition houses a kitchen and family room on the main level, and the master bedroom and roof deck above. Sliding glass doors now allow generous sightlines to the yard, and also convey a lightness to the new architecture that contrasts with the character of the old.
For the new addition, new brick syncs with the old, while blackened steel provides a modern counterpoint to the historic facade.
In New Hampshire White Mountains, the Rocky Brook weeHouse is a loft-like home designed to embrace forest views and the sounds of rushing creek nearby.
Designed for senior design director at Apple, the ultra-minimal Sonoma weeHouse in California is a custom high-end build comprising two minimalist, open-sided boxes with nine-foot-tall sliding glass walls to open the interiors up to the outdoors.
An outdoor shower lets guests fully connect with nature.
The Edgecliff Residence by Miró Rivera Architects is divided into three levels, with the guest quarters at ground level, living spaces on the second floor, and the master suite at the highest level.
Buhaus can be customized with a variety of finishes, and buyers can choose from a range of “editions”—from standard polished aluminum to black and even camouflage exteriors. The build time is approximately three months.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.