1,061 Exterior Metal Siding Material Metal Roof Material Design Photos And Ideas

The architects considered a number of different fire-resistant materials for the exterior cladding, including zinc and a special kind of pre-burnt wood. “It was my husband’s idea to do the copper,” says Cathie. “He said, copper is down, so buy all the copper you can buy!”
GreenSpur and McAllister Architects imagined a cabin sided with Cor-Ten steel, glass, and shou sugi ban–treated cedar for a wooded property outside of Washington, DC.
The exterior of Site Shack is covered in steel panels that are bolted to the framing. Look closely and you won’t see any visible fasteners, as Powers Construction’s welder was fastidious, creating a seamless shell with just steel and glass.
Naturally rusted steel sheathes the cabins that Malek Alqadi built on a 1954 homestead outside Joshua Tree National Park. "I loved the idea of stitching the existing structure back together, reinforcing it, and giving it life again without compromising the beautiful setting it’s in," he says.
Generations of family have lived on this wooded, waterfront site, where architect Will Randolph has built a weekend getaway for less than $70,000.
Drawing inspiration from fire towers and Nordic folklore, the PAN Treetop Cabins are two 431-square-feet lofted A-frames that sleep six people each. Elevated 26 feet in the air by steel poles and clad in black oxidized zinc and steel, the structures blend into the forested landscape of Eastern Norway.
The 304-square-foot house in Queensland, Australia, is clad with steel and cedar—materials that help the home meld with the wooded landscape.
When a family in Queensland, Australia, suffered the loss of a loved one, a tiny home became their ticket to financial freedom.
To open up the backyard, the architects removed the existing timber enclosure that once covered the pool.
In the evening, the home lights up like a lantern.
Matte white Colorbond cladding wraps the timber-framed extension. Blue stone pavers wind around the pool.
The Lantern House extension is passively cooled in summer with operable skylights, ceiling fans, louvered windows, and remote-controlled blinds that shield the upper windows.
The ground floor projects out from the slope and sits over the top of the concrete foundations, in which a wine cellar—accessed through a hatch in the hallway floor—is located.
The sharply angled roof balances the fragmented form of the home at the front. “We called the roof the ‘shark’s fin roof’ when we were designing it,” says Craig. “It offers a formal counterpoint to the mass of the upstairs, but uses a sharp angle to create a dynamic form as the building goes down the site.”
The home is made of 42 unique cross-laminated timber panels. The smallest panel is 450 millimeters x 1500 millimeters, and the largest panel is the entire southern wall—14.4 meters x 2.3 meters. The cantilevered ground floor at the rear of the home was made possible by the strength of these panels.
There is a play between really earthy, natural materials—which are seen in some of the cladding, tiles, and concrete work—and a very sleek, black metal aesthetic. “I have a lot of experience in commercial architecture, so I’m not scared of using more commercial, industrial materials on a residential building,” says Craig.
The Douglas fir cladding is from Abodo, and the home is the first project in New Zealand to use iron vitriol to treat timber cladding. The innovative finishing option enhances the natural qualities of the band-sawn timber, creating a striking contrast with the metal cladding.
The house fronts the street with the large top story and a sharply angled roof that defines the staircase, creating a striking form—especially at night, when it is lit up from within.
The form of the 556-square-foot home in Tokyo that Tomoko Sasaki designed for her close friends inspired the name Milk Carton House.
When viewed from the adjacent road and forest, the Origami House appears completely closed with no visible windows.
Using a steel structure posed challenges for both the design and construction process, say the architects. “It required high accuracy and none of the elements were repeatable.”
Every element and facet of the design was developed with 3D modeling.
The architects sprayed a graphite polyurethane  coating onto the steel structure to achieve an origami-inspired "visually light, paper form".
Large panes of glass direct views from the Origami House to the garden, which is lined with white gravel, a likely reference to Japanese rock gardens. A large skylight also tops the building to let in additional light.
Built mainly from steel, the multifaceted Origami House features a matte, all-black finish that distinguishes the building from its neighbors.
Located in the historic Polish city of Toruń, the simple and clean design of the Origami House complements the contemporary main house.
The front door is crafted from solid spotted gum hardwood, which echoes the joinery used in the interior.
After renovations were complete, the family took a trip from Canada, through the USA, to Baja, Mexico.
A 1976 Airstream Sovereign International Land Yacht was perfect for Lynne’s family of four.
Having never renovated an Airstream before, Tristan and Lynne Knowlton took to the challenge with plenty of gusto (and elbow grease).
"The shipping container was placed on a cinder-block crawl space, which contains the furnace, the plumbing, and a tankless hot-water heater," Dianna says.
The Lily Pad is a 280-square-foot shipping container home located near Hocking Hills State Park, Ohio.
Exterior Side View with Outdoor Pool and Patio
Fed up with their cramped apartment in an expensive town, Alexandra Benet and Aaron Gravelle already had a Connect Homes ADU saved on a Pinterest board when they discovered this Menlo Park, California, guesthouse for rent on Craigslist. “We were dreaming about a new place to live, where we could start our own business, and there it was, a house just like the one Alexandra had pinned,” says Aaron.
The tiny home is clad with standing-seam metal and cedar. An outdoor kitchen area on the deck provides added living space and ties the home to the natural landscape.
Tony and Charlotte Perez designed and built their own 280-square-foot home, which features an expansive deck off of the front facade.
The cabin decks all face either expansive views of the ocean or the magical forest of fir trees.
Saltwater Farm is situated on the shoreline of San Juan Island, which is only accessible via sea or air.
All the wood used for the front porch siding, decking, and furniture came from trees harvested from the land and milled/cured on the property.
The RAD LAB team thoughtfully placed each cabin amongst the pines to ensure quality views and a secluded experience for guests.
One of the driving principles behind the design of Saltwater Farm was to have minimal impact on the site, so the cabins sit above the uneven landscape on stilts.
Both the main house and the cabins were designed to bring the outside in, celebrating a connection with the surrounding forest. The expansive deck on the main house almost doubles the usable square footage, blurring the barrier between the interior and exterior.
The clients—Dr. Merriss Waters, a veterinarian, and Dr. Andrew Fleming, a clinical child psychologist—had a lifelong dream to live in a pristine, pastoral setting in the Pacific Northwest. “They live an active lifestyle and enjoy exploring the islands,” says architect Taylor Bode. “Their hobbies include mountain biking, trail running, farming, and cooking for friends and family.”  In addition to an event space in an existing barn and cabin rentals, Saltwater Farm is home to productive gardens and a variety of animals.
Five cabins are located in the pine forest surrounding the main house. “The design for both the main house and cabins at Saltwater Farm resulted from studying traditional Pacific Northwest cabins and refining that vernacular language with one of Scandinavian minimalism,” says designer Taylor Bode.
Saltwater Farm is located just outside the small town of Friday Harbor, which has a population of less than 2,500. “San Juan Island has a beautiful valley populated with farms, and it’s supported by a tourism- and agriculture-driven economy,” says designer Taylor Bode. “It was seen by Andrew and Merriss as the perfect place to bring their farm vision to life.”
A timber palette emphasizes indoor/outdoor living. The outdoor cedar deck visually extends the interior white oak floors. The ceilings and soffits are made of hemlock.
Designed for energy efficiency, the home features insulation above code and hydronic radiant heating. Note the Morso 6148 wood-burning stove in the entry hall that’s fueled by locally felled lumber.
Completed in 2018 on a 2.6-acre site in the San Juan Islands, the two-bedroom modular home was installed in a day.
This house’s success lies in it being true in a number of ways – to architectonic and material expression, to site and to the occupants’ ways of life.
The trapezoid-shaped addition hosts a new master suite on the main level.
The team preserved the deck, but installed a new railing.
The dark brick facade peels away into the garage, creating an interior stairwell. The garage door, like the front door, is crafted from black steel.
The warehouse-inspired front door on the southern side of the home is crafted from black steel and features a solid steel screen that slides in front of it, creating a completely blank facade.
The neighboring property has a beautiful, established garden. The gridded windows of the Park Terrace house—which take inspiration from the industrial warehouse archetype—are positioned to capture snippets of this garden, in effect borrowing the landscape. A small terrace has been cut out of the gable form to create a division between the master bedroom and the living area.
The southern facade of the home—the entrance—is a completely blank facade, which gives the home a private aspect, says the architect. The brick facade curves into the interior of the home.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.