967 Exterior Metal Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

The upper volume reaches for the infinite view.
The house wraps itself around the historic tree while allowing the natural landscape to do the same around itself.
From the edge of the property the graceful entry and landscape gently slope around to a lower yard.
The entry portal shows itself to the public.
Neighborhood looks towards the site and house anchoring the landscape.
The dark and gabled addition offers sharp contrast against the low-lying white-painted bungalow. Elements such as the steel pillars were repeated in both structures for continuity.
An exterior view of the property.
The modern addition in the snow at dusk.
A self sustainable, eco friendly, Australian made tiny home.
The exterior. You can see our wood stove flue and solar panels on the roof. When we bought our bus it was faded black, chipping and forgotten; I'll admit even a bit scary looking. We spent weeks prepping the body and painted the bus ourselves. It was one of the most challenging, yet rewarding steps of building this tiny home.
The entryway, refreshed but mainly original. You can see the black co-pilot seat we installed to the left, bolted to the front cage.
Diamond Head Mountain House
"With both sliding doors open, the two decks connect seamlessly through the building, dramatically changing the sense of scale, space, and connection to the site."
Exterior Storage Access
Writer Marc Kristal described the house as "a lapidary example of Miesian simplicity: a 25-by-95-foot rectangle, composed of a black exposed-steel frame, front and northern elevations clad largely in white glazed brick, and southern and western exposures enclosed by floor-to-ceiling glass sliders."
Currently, Build Tiny's models are all designed to be built on a trailer. However, the company can also construct the units on fixed footings.
LOHA’s design is a result of new code requirements and creatively working within limitations so that the project would successfully maximize the site potential.
A large blade screen provides privacy to the rear terrace from an adjacent neighbour
The refashioned rear of the original 1960’s brick dwelling, northern courtyard secondary entry, and intermediary circulation link beyond sharply folding  to meet the two-storey volume
Wall, roof and floor planes extend the envelope at the rear to form a covered terrace, improve privacy from adjacent neighbours and strengthen connection to its external environment
Northern interior to exterior connections onto a covered terrace with its cantilevered edge and sculpted step element doubling as seats for enjoyment of the garden
Standing-seam siding folds up from the street façade over the roofline to the roof deck, creating a seamless transition between wall and roof.
Greenroof Outside of Office
View from Southwest
West Elevation Detail
View from Boat Dock
The cabin is composed of six prefabricated modules placed side by side atop a six-meter long iron frame.
Colour accents in automotive paint provide accents and identity to each structure.
The south facade showcases the third level addition and new wood, metal and concrete cladding materials.
The Lume Traveler’s kitchen is accessed from a rear hatch similar to a teardrop trailer. There is also a 40-liter fridge below the counter that slides out as needed, with plenty of storage for all your cooking supplies.
On the first floor of Casa R is a woodshed and a "chiflonera." This area between the interiors and exteriors is commonly found in Chilean/Patagonian homes, as it helps to regulate the region’s extreme temperature changes.
The 500-square-foot cabin and adjacent shed are 100 percent off-grid, with water, sewer, and electrical systems in place to support these buildings and any future development.
Lagos has raised the cabin above the ground on supporting steel to avoid damaging any of the existing trees on site.
The home is spread across two floors.
Track lighting illuminates the gallery space at night.
Round concrete blocks leading to a sliding door entrance contrast against the volume's unique angular shape.
Full-height glazing mainly wraps around the west and south sides of the structure to frame views of Camelback Mountain.
The new addition sits adjacent to a landscaped courtyard and an existing fire pit. Camelback Mountain can be seen in the distance.
Elevated above a desert wash, the studio is supported by six 36-inch diameter concrete caissons.
Twelve-foot-tall weathering steel panels clad the new addition. Standard modules were used to speed up the fabrication process.
Looking north, the a clear contrast can be seen between the new steel-and-glass art studio and the existing stucco residence.
In the entrance, a team with the general contracting firm Martha uncovered an abstract mural that Engels painted himself and then plastered over. He also made the geometric door handle. Simon speculates that Engels sourced the marble, found all over the house, from Expo ’58, after the pavilions had been dismantled.
Villa Engels, the home of the esteemed Belgian modernist Lucien Engels (1928–2016), was falling apart when its second owners bought it in 2013. Yet due to its heritage status, any changes they planned would have to be approved by the provincial preservation office. Engels completed the elongated, cantilevered residence in 1958, the same year he finalized the master plan for Expo ’58, the Brussels World’s Fair that famously featured the Atomium.
LED ambient downlights allow the home to glow at night.
An outdoor pool offers refreshing dips with views of hills blanketed with oaks, pines, and manzanita.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.