252 Exterior Metal Siding Material House Gable Roofline Design Photos And Ideas

The custom sliding window screens, which shield from solar gain, were designed by the couple and are a modernized reference to the operable shutters that Denise remembers from her childhood in Austria. They first used the idea on one of their apartment buildings.
On the front facade, ground-faced concrete blocks contrast with cumaru wood tongue-and-groove siding.
A rear view of the home shows how the old structure is wrapped in corrugated Cor-Ten steel, marking it as an "artifact of the site," as John describes. The new residence gently slopes away from the neighboring house rather than towering over it.
The site in Darling Point is on a winding street leading up a hill, and the new architecture is designed to express the pitched-roof language of the original terrace house. “It’s incredibly steep at the back, which means the house looks rather modest from the street front—just a pitched-roof garage and a gate,” says architect Bronwyn Litera. “At the rear facing Rushcutters Bay, however, it drops away over a height of five stories. The house is also in a heritage conservation zone, which meant that the existing roof line and chimneys needed to be retained. We worked closely with TC Build to form a ‘plan of attack,’ which involved propping the two long walls and the roof, and completely gutting the interiors.”
The home’s exterior is clad in panels made from expanded corkboard—a sustainable, cost-effective material that provides insulation.
A corrugated metal roof and cork-panel siding were durable, cost-effective material choices, but their textures also recall those of the area’s historic homes and agricultural buildings.
In this semirural suburban setting, the home’s floor-to-ceiling windows often attract wildlife visitors.
Casa Parasito effortlessly provides accommodations for two people in a cleverly unique location: the rooftop of a city building in San Juan, Ecuador. El Sindicato Arquitectura wanted to not only provide a home, but also contribute positively to the densification challenge that the city’s inhabitants face. The design concept hinges on an A-frame facade. Within, an interior layout is marked by a rectangular core—also the main social/living space—from which all other utilitarian spaces, such as the kitchen, dining area, bathroom, bed, work area, and storage are accessed.
Glazed sliding doors connect the living spaces to an outdoor deck built with Silvertop ash. Setbacks allow for “deep pockets of garden,” according to the architects.
The architects also minimized the appearance of the street-facing garages by concealing the western townhouse’s carport behind a timber picket gate and seamlessly integrating the other fully enclosed garage into the facade. Here is a close-up of the deeply recessed eastern townhouse entrance with the concealed carport to the left.
“The brick detailing at the entries, together with rich timber and crisp white cladding, inverts the cul-de-sac palette but plays along,” note the architects.
The ground-floor volume is covered warm timber surfaces and stucco render with a Dulux Surfmist paint finish.
Following the example of the neighboring homes, the architects placed the upper floor slightly behind the ground-floor volume. Although the new roof is only 47 inches taller than its single-story predecessor, it allows for a second story.
Designed by Fowler and Ward, this affordable two-unit home provides a beautiful solution to the Melbourne’s housing shortage.
To open up the backyard, the architects removed the existing timber enclosure that once covered the pool.
This warehouse conversion by Ian Moore Architects also features an equine genetics laboratory and an enormous garage filled with classic cars.
Timmins + Whyte carves out a sun-soaked haven in a heritage-listed Melbourne home.
The Cor-Ten steel of the front facade wraps around the roof, the chimney, and a dormer, lending a sculptural aesthetic.
The kitchen and dining area are arranged on the home’s ground level.
The Cor-Ten steel, now a bright orange-brown tone, will patina over time, lending a dynamic quality to the artful home.
The three-story home features a front facade clad with Cor-Ten steel that both blends into—and departs from—the traditional brick facades around it.
Zecc Architecten and their clients Roland Manders and Hanne Caspersen transformed an early 1900s garage into a 1,000-square-foot home in Utrecht, Netherlands.
Rear View
In the evening, the home lights up like a lantern.
Matte white Colorbond cladding wraps the timber-framed extension. Blue stone pavers wind around the pool.
The side view of the home shows its full scale, and the separation between work and life signified through different materials.
All the wood used for the front porch siding, decking, and furniture came from trees harvested from the land and milled/cured on the property.
Both the main house and the cabins were designed to bring the outside in, celebrating a connection with the surrounding forest. The expansive deck on the main house almost doubles the usable square footage, blurring the barrier between the interior and exterior.
The clients—Dr. Merriss Waters, a veterinarian, and Dr. Andrew Fleming, a clinical child psychologist—had a lifelong dream to live in a pristine, pastoral setting in the Pacific Northwest. “They live an active lifestyle and enjoy exploring the islands,” says architect Taylor Bode. “Their hobbies include mountain biking, trail running, farming, and cooking for friends and family.”  In addition to an event space in an existing barn and cabin rentals, Saltwater Farm is home to productive gardens and a variety of animals.
Saltwater Farm is located just outside the small town of Friday Harbor, which has a population of less than 2,500. “San Juan Island has a beautiful valley populated with farms, and it’s supported by a tourism- and agriculture-driven economy,” says designer Taylor Bode. “It was seen by Andrew and Merriss as the perfect place to bring their farm vision to life.”
During the renovation, Chu extended the bathroom next to the master bedroom outwards to create a bath and shower room that blurs the boundaries between interior and exterior. He also added a skylight made from a repurposed car sunroof, which was purchased secondhand for $100 and could be operated by remote control to easily let the elements in. “There were many challenges in what we wanted to do,” says Chu. “Then, we searched for materials and ways of doing that—or we let the site inspire us.”
The sliding front door is made of glass panels, and its bright red color was inspired by the red doors (symbolic of fortune and prosperity) found in traditional villages in Taiwan. “We wanted the front door to be transparent so that light filters into the interior even when the door is closed,” says Chu. “It was very important to have a constant relationship between inside and outside.”
The trapezoid-shaped addition hosts a new master suite on the main level.
The team preserved the deck, but installed a new railing.
At night, the home’s interior is illuminated through the windows and skylights. As a result, the character of the built form is transformed from private and introverted to extroverted.
The dark brick facade peels away into the garage, creating an interior stairwell. The garage door, like the front door, is crafted from black steel.
The warehouse-inspired front door on the southern side of the home is crafted from black steel and features a solid steel screen that slides in front of it, creating a completely blank facade.
The neighboring property has a beautiful, established garden. The gridded windows of the Park Terrace house—which take inspiration from the industrial warehouse archetype—are positioned to capture snippets of this garden, in effect borrowing the landscape. A small terrace has been cut out of the gable form to create a division between the master bedroom and the living area.
The southern facade of the home—the entrance—is a completely blank facade, which gives the home a private aspect, says the architect. The brick facade curves into the interior of the home.
The previous home on the Park Terrace site was damaged in the earthquake and subsequently demolished. Architect Phil Redmond, director of PRau, used this project to explore an archetypal industrial form which was lost as a result of the earthquakes.
This uber-green dwelling not only walks the walk, it talks the talk.
The gable decoration is a Viking element traditionally used to protect homes from danger. The “moon” shape comes from the shape of Viking horns.
Built from simple materials and quietly fitting into the landscape, the family home is a reflection of its bucolic surroundings.
The home is functionally modular, suitable for one person or the whole family. When they travel to the property alone, the clients are able to access just the master suite, while keeping the rest of the home closed off.
The home’s more sheltered faces are clad with humidity-treated pine paneling in a bold, dark hue.
Micro-corrugated zinc sheets were used on the areas most exposed to rain and wind, treated so that the finish was rusty, but not uniformly so. "After many tests I did in my house, I managed to find a technique to oxidize the material and achieve the patina we were looking for," says Sánchez.
"The materiality and the look of the house had to have the identity of Chiloé," says Sánchez. Corrugated zinc panels clad the home’s exterior, zinc being the chosen material which "covers 90% of the houses in Southern Chile."
The home is built with minimal disturbance to the landscape, perched on piles which mitigate the slope of the site.
Designing to attract the least possible attention, Sánchez ensured that the home respected its environmental and cultural context.
A key directive in the home’s design was that "the materials were all from the island, and all very simple," says Sánchez.
In designing the home, "a very important factor was the study of the construction in the area, both in materials and orientation, especially due to the weather," explains architect Baltazar Sánchez. "The conversations with the locals were very important."
Many of the windows face the herb garden.
The light bronze aluminum finish of the protruding window frames were inspired by traditional farm windows that typically feature bright colors.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.