1,462 Exterior Metal Siding Material House Design Photos And Ideas - Page 4

The home has large areas of glazing on the east and west facades. Given the small footprint of the home and the open floor plan, the entire interior experiences direct light in the morning and evening.
There is now continuous, stepped landscaping from one home to the next as the buildings and street rise up the hillside.
The gable decoration is a Viking element traditionally used to protect homes from danger. The “moon” shape comes from the shape of Viking horns.
Built from simple materials and quietly fitting into the landscape, the family home is a reflection of its bucolic surroundings.
The home is functionally modular, suitable for one person or the whole family. When they travel to the property alone, the clients are able to access just the master suite, while keeping the rest of the home closed off.
In the home's private wing, patios interspersed between the bedrooms act as spatial and sound buffers.
The home’s more sheltered faces are clad with humidity-treated pine paneling in a bold, dark hue.
Micro-corrugated zinc sheets were used on the areas most exposed to rain and wind, treated so that the finish was rusty, but not uniformly so. "After many tests I did in my house, I managed to find a technique to oxidize the material and achieve the patina we were looking for," says Sánchez.
"The materiality and the look of the house had to have the identity of Chiloé," says Sánchez. Corrugated zinc panels clad the home’s exterior, zinc being the chosen material which "covers 90% of the houses in Southern Chile."
The home is built with minimal disturbance to the landscape, perched on piles which mitigate the slope of the site.
Designing to attract the least possible attention, Sánchez ensured that the home respected its environmental and cultural context.
A key directive in the home’s design was that "the materials were all from the island, and all very simple," says Sánchez.
In designing the home, "a very important factor was the study of the construction in the area, both in materials and orientation, especially due to the weather," explains architect Baltazar Sánchez. "The conversations with the locals were very important."
When envisioning the perfect home for their family, Kiley and Jim agreed that accessibility was paramount—access to the outdoors, and access for their daughters, Langley and Boelyn, who have special needs and rely on their wheelchairs to get around. After purchasing a narrow lot in Downers Grove, Illinois, the couple reached out to Chicago-based firm Kuklinski + Rappe Architects to design a residence that would serve their daughters, their son Huck, and their own various needs. Crafted to adapt to the family's lifestyle over the years, the home will provide lifelong health and happiness.
Gabions and loose stone create walkable pervious surfaces.
Designed for year-round use, the Rocky Brook weeHouse features covered and exposed spaces for enjoying the outdoors.
To minimize energy use, the residence relies on natural ventilation for cooling. Heat is provided by an inflow hydronic tubing system. Note the guesthouse seen behind the bridge.
The clients encouraged the development of hemlock trees, which grow from the creek to the building site. They create a beautiful backdrop for the second story of the main building and deck overtop the master bedroom.
The home is clad in corrugated Cor-ten steel siding selected for its durability and ability to blend the home into its natural surroundings over time.
Located two hours north of Boston, the Rocky Brook weeHouse is carved out of the grade of a steep creekside lot.
Architect Eric Logan took minimalism to the max when he rebuilt his family cabin on a Wyoming mountainside.
Roger and Mary Downey’s 3,200-square-foot rammed-earth home seems to float next to the forest along the Rio Grande in Corrales, New Mexico. While the home’s design and materials nod to the neighboring adobe farmhouses and agricultural sheds, architect Efthimios Maniatis of Studio eM Design calls them an amalgam of “modern contemporary regionalism,” governed by Roger’s strict mandate for minimalism.
Forty-seven years ago, Peter and Turkey Stremmel opened Stremmel Gallery, one of the first fine-art showplaces in Reno. They went on to exhibit work there by such luminaries as Wolf Kahn, Charles Arnoldi, and Phyllis Shafer. The same architect who designed the gallery, Mark Mack, designed their home, a cluster of colorful cubes in the mountains above the city.
Tapped by art collectors to design an inspirational residence in rural Montana, Jackson Hole–based Carney Logan Burke Architects crafted a modern house that frames the property’s extraordinary landscape views.
Walls of glass, horizontal roof planes, and a natural material palette enable this expansive home to feel like an extension of a dramatic boulder-strewn landscape in Idaho.
Designed by Portland-based Skylab Architecture, the 4,200-square-foot Owl Creek Residence in Snowmass, Colorado, has an unusual, triangulated floor plan that responds to the height and slope constraints of the site.
Amagansett Modular House by MB Architecture
A timber boardwalk through the veld grass leads to a 15-meter, reed-filtration lap pool.
"Wendy and Lukas were looking for a natural, sporty lifestyle and a sustainably designed home," says Daffonchio. "It is always rewarding to see the owners living the lifestyle they had dreamed, and seeing their joy in living the home and its incredible surroundings."
Monaghan Farm is a 1,300-acre eco-estate about an hour north of the center of Johannesburg. The architectural and environmental guidelines for the estate outline that only 3% of the land will ever be built on.
Sited on a typical 25-by-100-foot corner lot in Brooklyn, this 5,000-square-foot residence was built with 21 stacked shipping containers cut diagonally along the top and bottom to create a step-like structure with four tiered levels and a small pool between the two lower levels.
<span style="font-family: Theinhardt, -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, &quot;Segoe UI&quot;, Roboto, Oxygen-Sans, Ubuntu, Cantarell, &quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;, sans-serif;">The architect couple's h</span><span style="font-family: Theinhardt, -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, &quot;Segoe UI&quot;, Roboto, Oxygen-Sans, Ubuntu, Cantarell, &quot;Helvetica Neue&quot;, sans-serif;">ouse, which sits at the edge of a meadow, marks the first time the award-winning designers have integrated ground-up architecture and interior fittings so closely.</span>
Sculptural olive trees frame the house, which is woven with its natural setting.
An outdoor shower on the northern elevation lets the residents spend practical time in the landscape.
A colored ventilation system on the upper portion of the eastern elevation expels warm air and helps to cool the home's interior. The metal siding below the vents folds open and facilitates outdoor connection and more air circulation.
The home's simple silhouette and sloped metal roof references historical agrarian-style architecture that dots rural landscapes throughout the globe.
"The porch was designed to use most of the concrete slab surface," Sopeoglou says. "The metal panels fold out from the kitchen and allow for maximum openness. I removed the structural column from the corner so the space is free from obstruction, and the clients can enjoy the views when they gather during lunchtime."
"The architectural reference for using metal sheets is the existing sheepfolds and sheds which were scattered around these hills before any of the summer vacationers settled here," Sopeoglou says. "One can still hear during the day distant sounds of bells from the herds feeding on the land."
Many of the windows face the herb garden.
The light bronze aluminum finish of the protruding window frames were inspired by traditional farm windows that typically feature bright colors.
A rooftop terrace tops the tallest building.
"The idea is that everything within the circle is designed and man-made and all that is outside the circle is this ‘listed’ nature, the landscape," explain the architects of the circular pathway that surrounds the buildings. "The circle functions as an edge, that is also a place. A boundary between landscape and garden. It places the house and garden in the landscape. A place to have a deep breath of fresh air after a busy day. The clients told us that the circle is used almost daily to move around the house. It’s very interesting to see how people appropriate the design and how they give new meaning and attributes."
The barn-shaped pair of gabled buildings flank a taller volume for visual contrast. The grass mound conceals a passageway that connects the two buildings on the right.
The Dutch ‘hoeve’ informed Villa Vught’s material palette of dark bronze anodized aluminum cladding that wraps both the facade and the roof in a nod to the corrugated iron rooftops of nearby farm buildings.
Referencing the farmhouse typology ties the building into its agricultural setting, while helping the project’s various functions—a residence, cooking studio, and guest suite—read as a unified whole across 7,352 square feet.
"I like things not to have a beginning and an end," says Stan Symonds, an Australian architect obsessed with circular forms and curving walls. Many of his projects feature circular forms of one kind or another, including his Dome House in Seaforth. Just a year after building finishing that project, Symonds completed this striking house nearby for John and Margaret Schuchard that has also been known as the ‘Space House’ or ‘Spaceship.’ The building, resembling a lookout station or observation post, sits on a steep hill with panoramic views out across Middle Harbor. The house mushrooms upwards and thrusts outwards at one and the same time, like the rounded bow of a ship emerging from the rock.
As well as a sequence of innovative country houses, Peter Foggo and David Thomas complete a number of residences in Wimbledon. The most accomplished of these was this project, completed in 1963, sitting on a street of traditional and substantial period dwellings, mostly in brick. Foggo & Thomas’ house, in contrast, is both low slung and distinctly modern. Its structural framework is provided by a combination of concrete trusses that span the flat-roofed house, forming a series of spider leg ‘bridges,’ working in concert with a linear and lighter steel frame.
The Portage Bay Residence is a streamlined home that enjoys lake views and total privacy. The garage melds into the industrial, flat exterior, which resembles maritime sheds found throughout the area.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.