1,462 Exterior Metal Siding Material House Design Photos And Ideas - Page 3

“The clients are passionate about nature conservation,’ says architect Ant Vervoot. “They know how every plant, insect, and animal fits into the greater ecosystem—their curiosity about the Bushveld is insatiable and inspiring. It really is an amazing thing to be around them in the bush.”
“We asked Frankie for a home, and they built us a fantasy,” remarked the clients when House of the Tall Chimneys and House of the Big Arch were completed.
The guesthouse is located in a private reserve in the Waterberg, a mountainous region about three hours from Johannesburg.
A brick path leads through the forest to the entrance of House of the Tall Chimneys. “Bricks are a really cost effective way of creating space,” says architect Ant Vervoort. “Over and above that, when used correctly, bricks create complex patterns that I don’t think it’s possible to mimic using other materials.”
The entrance to House of the Big Arch is a nine-meter-tall passage, which creates a high-pressure system that pulls cool air into the kitchen.
The aluminum windows are powder coated in a charcoal color, which is intended to match the shadows created by the forest and help the building further blend in.
The front door is crafted from solid spotted gum hardwood, which echoes the joinery used in the interior.
Exterior Side View with Outdoor Pool and Patio
The side view of the home shows its full scale, and the separation between work and life signified through different materials.
All the wood used for the front porch siding, decking, and furniture came from trees harvested from the land and milled/cured on the property.
Both the main house and the cabins were designed to bring the outside in, celebrating a connection with the surrounding forest. The expansive deck on the main house almost doubles the usable square footage, blurring the barrier between the interior and exterior.
The clients—Dr. Merriss Waters, a veterinarian, and Dr. Andrew Fleming, a clinical child psychologist—had a lifelong dream to live in a pristine, pastoral setting in the Pacific Northwest. “They live an active lifestyle and enjoy exploring the islands,” says architect Taylor Bode. “Their hobbies include mountain biking, trail running, farming, and cooking for friends and family.”  In addition to an event space in an existing barn and cabin rentals, Saltwater Farm is home to productive gardens and a variety of animals.
Saltwater Farm is located just outside the small town of Friday Harbor, which has a population of less than 2,500. “San Juan Island has a beautiful valley populated with farms, and it’s supported by a tourism- and agriculture-driven economy,” says designer Taylor Bode. “It was seen by Andrew and Merriss as the perfect place to bring their farm vision to life.”
During the renovation, Chu extended the bathroom next to the master bedroom outwards to create a bath and shower room that blurs the boundaries between interior and exterior. He also added a skylight made from a repurposed car sunroof, which was purchased secondhand for $100 and could be operated by remote control to easily let the elements in. “There were many challenges in what we wanted to do,” says Chu. “Then, we searched for materials and ways of doing that—or we let the site inspire us.”
The sliding front door is made of glass panels, and its bright red color was inspired by the red doors (symbolic of fortune and prosperity) found in traditional villages in Taiwan. “We wanted the front door to be transparent so that light filters into the interior even when the door is closed,” says Chu. “It was very important to have a constant relationship between inside and outside.”
The glass-backed home illuminated at night.
A timber palette emphasizes indoor/outdoor living. The outdoor cedar deck visually extends the interior white oak floors. The ceilings and soffits are made of hemlock.
Designed for energy efficiency, the home features insulation above code and hydronic radiant heating. Note the Morso 6148 wood-burning stove in the entry hall that’s fueled by locally felled lumber.
Completed in 2018 on a 2.6-acre site in the San Juan Islands, the two-bedroom modular home was installed in a day.
This house’s success lies in it being true in a number of ways – to architectonic and material expression, to site and to the occupants’ ways of life.
The ground-floor living space looks inward to the courtyard and is protected on all other sides by the mass of the building and the blank brick facade.
A side patio leads from the front of the home to the courtyard. The same red bricks used for the facade have been used for the paving to create a seamless fabric that wraps the built form and the site.
The slim profile of the red bricks used in the facade creates a textured surface across the monolithic form, while red and brown tones of each brick create an organic, varied pattern of color.
The entire home is wrapped in a brick "skin" that extends onto the ground at the front and sides of the home. The entrance is found through a simple void in the facade beside a pond with floating vegetation that hints at the verdant interior.
The trapezoid-shaped addition hosts a new master suite on the main level.
The team preserved the deck, but installed a new railing.
At night, the home’s interior is illuminated through the windows and skylights. As a result, the character of the built form is transformed from private and introverted to extroverted.
The dark brick facade peels away into the garage, creating an interior stairwell. The garage door, like the front door, is crafted from black steel.
The warehouse-inspired front door on the southern side of the home is crafted from black steel and features a solid steel screen that slides in front of it, creating a completely blank facade.
The neighboring property has a beautiful, established garden. The gridded windows of the Park Terrace house—which take inspiration from the industrial warehouse archetype—are positioned to capture snippets of this garden, in effect borrowing the landscape. A small terrace has been cut out of the gable form to create a division between the master bedroom and the living area.
The southern facade of the home—the entrance—is a completely blank facade, which gives the home a private aspect, says the architect. The brick facade curves into the interior of the home.
The previous home on the Park Terrace site was damaged in the earthquake and subsequently demolished. Architect Phil Redmond, director of PRau, used this project to explore an archetypal industrial form which was lost as a result of the earthquakes.
Constructed with sustainably sourced lumber and large, double-pane windows, Studio Shed’s all-season Signature Series units are popularly used as backyard offices.
“The void in the veranda and deck creates a spectacular shaft of light that cuts across the shiny aluminum surface, reflecting rippled patterns into the house,” adds Mulla.
The young lancewoods in the sunken garden to the right of the deck are among Mulla’s favorite features of the home. “They will eventually grow through an opening through the roof and add to the light display.”
The metallic skin and white surfaces amplify the home’s radiant golden glow—even at night.
The new west-facing extension is wrapped in a mill-finished aluminum skin that changes color throughout the day and seasons. In the summer, the silver facade reflects a rose-colored glow, and in winter it shines a cool blue.
Vitex decking by Rosenfeld Kidson lines the L-shaped deck.
The deep roof overhang provides protection from the sun and bounces reflected yellow light from the floor.
Glazed doors slide open to seamlessly connect the living spaces with the outdoors.
A view of the parklike retreat from the backyard pool shows how the glass-enclosed entryway connects the living and sleeping areas.
"The use of materials, the careful details, the integrated sense of place, the weaving together of inside and out, and creating a special home that the clients love make this a special story for me," Epstein notes fondly.
As night falls, the home lights up like a lantern, enhancing the warm glow of the wood ceiling. Immense clerestory windows and glass sliders connect the home to the outdoors.
Built to commune with its scenic surroundings, this sustainable home embodies understated luxury.
The all-glass room provides views of the neighboring lake.
Metal details accent the home’s pared-down material palette.
A perforated metal screen allows the family to “see people on the street—but they can’t see the other direction into the house,” Lazor says.
A glimpse into the main bedroom at the end of the day. Windows on the south facade are oversized for solar gains, views, and a robust indoor/outdoor connection.
This uber-green dwelling not only walks the walk, it talks the talk.
The steel bridge—which echoes the design language of the steel brise soleil—extends from the second-floor study into the rear garden.
The deep brise soleil shades the interior as well and offers privacy from neighboring buildings without compromising the views.
Both the boys' bedroom and family room spill out into the ground floor garden, providing the children with an expanded play area outside of the house.
The two monolithic walls on the north and south sides are integrally colored, steel-troweled plaster. They anchor the home in its site as well as provide privacy from neighboring homes.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.