610 Exterior Glass Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas - Page 4

Aranzazu House - Besonías Almeida arquitectos
Aranzazu House - Besonías Almeida arquitectos
Aranzazu House - Besonías Almeida arquitectos
This airy addition on the back of a historic house in Boise is a model of sensitive renovation, seamlessly melding new and old. Photo by Lincoln Barbour.
Mori’s addition is constructed of steel, concrete, glass, and bluestone veneer. She decided to preserve the ceiling height of the main house (11’6”) and lined the roof with Voltaic solar panels.
The glass-enclosed master bedroom floats above the corrugated, oxidized steel exterior.
Cabin Knapphullet is small cabin inspired by its location nestled between large rocks and low vegetation of the Sandefjord coast in Norway. It is only 323 square feet, but contains an open living space with a bathroom and a mezzanine bed that sleeps two people. Although the building occupies a small footprint, the space expands vertically over four levels including a roof terrace.
A MODERN GLASS ADDITION IN BELGIUM

For this tiny house in the Belgian forest, a little extra square footage comes in the form of a glassed-in addition with a stellar view.
“Floating Farmhouse” in Eldred New York is a modern five-room holiday rental home with a touch of old world charm.
Outdoor walkway to the master bedroom
Glass Farmhouse | Olson Kundig
The home is made up of four gabled forms: the main house—with an attached master bedroom suite in its own distinct volume (on the left)—an artist studio, and an attached three-car garage.
The Pierre | Olson Kundig
Suzanne and Brooks Kelley at the back of their 1,100-square-foot guest cottage.
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With large glass panes covering the cabin's walls and gabled roof, the changing light outdoors encourages guests to sync their sleep schedules with the sun.
Here's the cover image in all its glory. Van der Rohe's Farnsworth House is the essential glass house (sorry Philip J) and looks pretty spectacular in the snow. One wonders if those windows are double-paned though. Photo by Jason Schmidt.
Large, dramatic openings bring transparency and contrast to the 10-inch-thick concrete facade, framing perspectival views of the landscape.
The clients were active participants in the conversation about how to mitigate challenges like street traffic noise (the house is set right on a major thoroughfare) and how to relieve some of the visual pressure of the openness of the front facade. The garage is located below the envelope of the height and coverage-restricted house which results in the floor and driveway level with the street, a critical detail in snow country.
In contrast to the intensity of the front facade is a wood-skin section of the house on the rear facade, containing sleeping areas that cantilever over the outdoor bar and dining area.
The house is anchored to its sloping site through a series of steps that lead from street-level to front entrance, and through the identification of the garage as a central element of the architecture.
For the exterior, Latimer used shou sugi ban charred cedar in addition to the corrugated metal. He says, "The design inspirations are both Japanese and Scandinavian. We wanted it to have a warm and cozy sense of hygge. Funke called it 'sensual design' because it appeals to all the senses."
The tiny home was built on a trailer for easy mobility.
The corrugated exterior echoes an old, corrugated shed on author Cornelia Funke's Malibu property.
The concrete platforms are set on large black columns, and cantilever over the driveway. Underneath the house is a workshop and parking area.
Alpine shelter on Mount Skuta.
Bold, red-colored shipping containers were used to create a (12 meter long) visitor area extension for the National Theatres Company of Korea. Designed as a social zone for theatregoers, the space was equipped with internal sliding partition walls that can be opened or closed to allow for flexible use of the interior spaces.
The rear of the house looks onto a lush backyard. The rough, industrial prefabricated concrete panels by the German manufacturer Syspro are the building blocks of the home.
Designed Californian architects Swatt Miers, these three tea houses on a private property were conceived as spaces outside the main home that would be free from the distractions of Internet, telecommunications and television. The largest of the three pavilions is used as a workspace, the second as a bedroom, and the third as a meditation pavilion.
It takes three to five days to install a Vipp Shelter onsite.
The main living area is cantilevered into the tree canopy, while bedrooms, bathrooms, service, and storage are located behind a long wall of cabinetry against the hillside.
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Cupertino, California
Dwell Magazine : September / October 2017
Lush landscaping softens the steep driveway that leads to the garage at the base of the house.
The soaring two-story structure at dusk.
In Washington’s Methow Valley, a modern cabin with an outdoor living room allows views of the surrounding woodland and meadow to perforate its volume.  
By day, the Chechaquo Lot 6 cabin gives the impression of floating in a forest clearing; by night, its windows glow against the wooded darkness. From all vantage points, the landscape permeates this 1,000-square-foot cabin, designed for two outdoor enthusiasts and tucked at the toe of a dramatic slope in Winthrop, Washington.
Sobek's extensive use of glass cladding for his projects effectively blends interior and exterior space, while providing plenty of natural light.
“Peter and I’ve got shockingly similar and far-reaching design inspirations. Our conversations would move easily from brutalism to driftwood 

to kachinas and then flow right back to something applicable to architecture. I can’t tell you how many times I will do that with a less-design-literate client and just get a blank stare!” —Architect Craig Steely
When Abbie and Bill Burton hired Marmol Radziner to design their prefab weekend home, their two requests were “simple-simple, replaceable materials,” says Abbie—such as concrete floors (poured offsite in Marmol Radziner's factory) and metal panel siding—and “the ability to be indoors or outdoors with ease.” Deep overhangs provide shade and protection from rain, so the Burtons can leave their doors open year-round and hang out on their 70-foot-long deck even in inclement weather. They visit the house once a month, usually for a week at a time, with Vinnie and Stella, their rescue Bernese Mountain dogs. Their two adult children occasionally join them. The couple hopes to one day retire here.
Based in Sacramento, CA, TAYNR specializes in prefab homes built from shipping containers.
The Gregory Residence is a masterclass example in design. Furnished by renowned New Hope woodworker George Nakashima, this private and rustic home offers ingenious versatility over its 1,644 square feet of space on a 10-acre lot.
The house that Fleetwood Fernandez Architects designed for contractor Mehran Taslimi and his wife, Laila, embraces its surroundings. “They wanted doors that they could just throw open,” designer Hunter Fleetwood says of the retractable wall system from Vitrocsa.
Located on a steep site with limited suitable building ground, the firm decided to cantilever the home over the hillside, which has the effect of helping the structure blend in with the landscape.
Resident Richard Kim, who works as the head of design at electric car company Faraday Future, tested his know-how with the creation of his own Los Angeles home, a curvilinear structure clad in Cor-Ten steel and black-stained cedar.
The north wall of the IST home functions as a cut-away, offering a peek inside an efficient yet cozy dwelling. Architect Peter Jurkovič built the home for a woman who had sold her flat in the big city of Bratislava and wanted something that reminded her of the village life of her childhood.
Torontonians Dan and Diane Molenaar head north to Drag Lake when they need a weekend away from urban life—though they brought some of the city with them. The mirrored windows that circle the cottage were recycled from two office towers in Toronto.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.