159 Exterior Concrete Siding Material Metal Siding Material Flat Roofline Design Photos And Ideas

“Courtyards are a fantastic way of controlling the sun here,” says architect Cavin Costello. “We live outdoors primarily in the late fall/winter, when the sun angle is very low, and tall walls are often more effective than roofs in providing shade for the outdoor spaces.”
The corrugated steel siding and roof reflect the radiant heat from the desert sun.
The three volumes of the home are defined by different materials, so they are both visually and functionally separate. The glazed “connectors” between the volumes are grounded by a large steel beam that runs across the top.
The entrance to home is defined by two Foo dogs, which are feng shui symbols of protection—and these dogs also give the home its name. The board-formed concrete of the main living wing has been left as is, creating a play of constantly changing shadows. Over time, weather will naturally soften these joints, and the look of the home will subtly evolve.
At night, it is easy to see how the volume at the north end of the site is stacked with the library and a private deck above, and the en suite guest bedroom below. This is separated from the rest of the living space by the open garage, offering increased privacy.
The modularity of the home’s construction is referenced in the grid-like windows. These large areas of glazing allow the home to be filled with natural light.
A concrete block tower in the garden beside the home contains a water tank and solar heating boiler with a shower below.
The metal roof and external walls are constructed from double-layered metallic roofing tiles, which were chosen for their durability against the elements.
The home requires very little maintenance and features a lightweight construction. The modularity of the design also helped to avoid excessive material waste during construction.
The clients are a husband and wife with grown children who no longer live at home. The husband is a psychoanalyst, and the wife is a history teacher at a middle school in São Paulo. During construction of the home, very little earthwork was needed, as the residence nestles into the sloped site to preserve the flat part of the site for a garden of native trees and shrubs.
Clark & Chapin Architects, Buffaloe House, Living Room Fireplace Exterior
The ground floor projects out from the slope and sits over the top of the concrete foundations, in which a wine cellar—accessed through a hatch in the hallway floor—is located.
The home is made of 42 unique cross-laminated timber panels. The smallest panel is 450 millimeters x 1500 millimeters, and the largest panel is the entire southern wall—14.4 meters x 2.3 meters. The cantilevered ground floor at the rear of the home was made possible by the strength of these panels.
There is a play between really earthy, natural materials—which are seen in some of the cladding, tiles, and concrete work—and a very sleek, black metal aesthetic. “I have a lot of experience in commercial architecture, so I’m not scared of using more commercial, industrial materials on a residential building,” says Craig.
The front door is crafted from solid spotted gum hardwood, which echoes the joinery used in the interior.
A side patio leads from the front of the home to the courtyard. The same red bricks used for the facade have been used for the paving to create a seamless fabric that wraps the built form and the site.
The slim profile of the red bricks used in the facade creates a textured surface across the monolithic form, while red and brown tones of each brick create an organic, varied pattern of color.
A view of the parklike retreat from the backyard pool shows how the glass-enclosed entryway connects the living and sleeping areas.
"The use of materials, the careful details, the integrated sense of place, the weaving together of inside and out, and creating a special home that the clients love make this a special story for me," Epstein notes fondly.
As night falls, the home lights up like a lantern, enhancing the warm glow of the wood ceiling. Immense clerestory windows and glass sliders connect the home to the outdoors.
The steel bridge—which echoes the design language of the steel brise soleil—extends from the second-floor study into the rear garden.
The deep brise soleil shades the interior as well and offers privacy from neighboring buildings without compromising the views.
Both the boys' bedroom and family room spill out into the ground floor garden, providing the children with an expanded play area outside of the house.
The two monolithic walls on the north and south sides are integrally colored, steel-troweled plaster. They anchor the home in its site as well as provide privacy from neighboring homes.
The home has large areas of glazing on the east and west facades. Given the small footprint of the home and the open floor plan, the entire interior experiences direct light in the morning and evening.
There is now continuous, stepped landscaping from one home to the next as the buildings and street rise up the hillside.
Walls of glass, horizontal roof planes, and a natural material palette enable this expansive home to feel like an extension of a dramatic boulder-strewn landscape in Idaho.
A timber boardwalk through the veld grass leads to a 15-meter, reed-filtration lap pool.
"Wendy and Lukas were looking for a natural, sporty lifestyle and a sustainably designed home," says Daffonchio. "It is always rewarding to see the owners living the lifestyle they had dreamed, and seeing their joy in living the home and its incredible surroundings."
Monaghan Farm is a 1,300-acre eco-estate about an hour north of the center of Johannesburg. The architectural and environmental guidelines for the estate outline that only 3% of the land will ever be built on.
As well as a sequence of innovative country houses, Peter Foggo and David Thomas complete a number of residences in Wimbledon. The most accomplished of these was this project, completed in 1963, sitting on a street of traditional and substantial period dwellings, mostly in brick. Foggo & Thomas’ house, in contrast, is both low slung and distinctly modern. Its structural framework is provided by a combination of concrete trusses that span the flat-roofed house, forming a series of spider leg ‘bridges,’ working in concert with a linear and lighter steel frame.
Windsor Residence by Dick Clark + Associates
007 House by Dick Clark + Associates
When Wexler and Harrison’s steel homes first hit the market in 1962, they were competitively priced between $13,000 and $17,000. Shown above is Steel House #2.
In Kansas City, Missouri, a family sought to construct a new home using prefabricated structural insulated panels (SIPS) instead of traditional frame construction. The entire kit house is composed of 4' x 8' sections, and the shell was constructed in about a week. The project’s relatively low cost, quick build time, and highly insulated envelope were positives, but the panels also have their limitations. “Most SIP projects look pretty stupid,” Jamie says. “They haven’t been manipulated by someone who’s thinking creatively.” In this case, Jamie augmented the simple panel system with a dynamic cantilever.
Designed as a vacation home for a young family, this tropical modern dwelling uses restrained forms and fundamental materials to stunning effect. The residence stands out for its simplicity in the use of exposed board-formed concrete, metal, and aluminum frames. The simple, long, and narrow volume is accentuated by large eaves that provide shading from the sun's warm rays.
From the street, the house rises two stories, dropping down on the opposite side to follow the slope. Clive envisioned the top floor as a “crow’s nest.”
The terrace, furnished with pieces by Noé Duchaufour-Lawrance for Ligne Roset, is the perfect spot for taking in views of the L.A. basin.
Taula House by M Gooden Design  |  Entry
Taula House by M Gooden Design  |  Exterior // Approach
Wexler and Harrison's original plan was to create affordable vacation homes for a growing middle class. When this home first went on the market with the others in 1962, it was competitively priced between $13,000 and $17,000. Today, the kitchen has been restored following guidelines from its original configuration, and the landscaping was updated in 2001 with Wexler's oversight.
A service yard is discreetly concealed behind a concrete screen. What appears as a series of concrete blocks opens up and becomes completely transparent on the hillside. It's all about embracing the views, the setting, and the climate.
At night, the concrete screen and glass walls reveal the living spaces beyond further emphasizing the transparency of the home.
The architects took advantage of the uneven site and nestled the home into the landscape, providing opportunity for a series of stacked volumes with different uses.
Landscape designer Vania Felchar selected tropical plant species that aligned with the contemporary architecture of the home. The climate inspired the choice of broadleaf species with many different shapes, resulting in an organic texture of greenery against a simple, refined formwork.
The basement of the home is partially embedded in the terrain, where the top of a natural hill creates the ground floor plane. This first floor is accessed by concrete steps.
The home's sloping roofline sweeps upward from an enclosed courtyard. The character of the house changes as light hits the mix of materials—from rough stone to sleek black aluminum—throughout the day, giving it a sense of constant motion.
The two-story addition hosts the master suite and a living area downstairs, and two bedrooms upstairs. It’s constructed of steel, concrete, and glass, to convey a “lightweight” quality that communes with the original mid-century architecture.
“Most homeowners would tear the whole thing down and start fresh,” says Brillhart. “But it made for a much more interesting project, preserving a little bit of Russell’s legacy and then adding two new wings on each side of the building.” An Ipe fence now lines the front of the property, and the two-story wing can be just glimpsed through the trees on the left.
For Gabriel Ramirez and his partner Sarah Mason Williams, following the Sea Ranch rules—local covenants guide new designs—didn’t mean slipping into Sea Ranch clichés. The architects love Cor-Ten steel, with its ruddy and almost organic surface, and they made it the main exterior material, along with board-formed concrete and ipe wood. The Cor-Ten, which quickly turned an autumnal rust in the sea air, and the concrete, with its grain and crannies, mean the house isn’t a pristine box, Ramirez says. His Neutra house “was very crisp and clean,” he says. “This house is more distressed, more wabi-sabi.”
Moxy Chelsea’s Cor-Ten steel columns and loft-style windows references the neighborhood’s industrial vibe, while the street-level Putnam & Putnam Flower Shop and Feroce Caffè and Ristorante draw visitors into a lush, playful interior.
Argentinian architect Luciano Kruk has designed Casa Golf, a striking 2,949-square-foot dwelling that's comprised of three stacked concrete and glass volumes. Soaring high on a 10,764-square-foot plot of land, the contemporary residence is surrounded by breathtaking views and an unparalleled natural environment.
Designed by Arthur Witthoefft of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill in 1961, this five-bedroom, five-bathroom midcentury house is set in the woods of Armonk, New York. The 5,000-square-foot home features full-height walls of glass, a wraparound floating terrace, and a quiet deck that overlooks the site's sylvan surroundings.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.