126 Exterior Concrete Siding Material Glass Siding Material Wood Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

The exterior of the home features warm blackbutt timber cladding and crisp black metalwork. Each level of the home opens out to a deck or balcony, and the curved white balustrade outside the main bedroom is a contemporary take on the original architecture.
The front fence is made from sandblasted stainless-steel rods coated in a protective penetrating sealer. The fence is cantilevered out from a concrete beam below the garden, and the gate retracts into an underground pit. “It’s the first of its type in Australia,” says architect Tony Vella. “It was a work of precision to have these thin rods slide down into the ground through 30mm holes.”
The home incorporates a number of sustainable features. Glass walls are protected by concrete eave overhangs and automated external sun blinds. In addition, the heavily insulated walls, floors, and ceiling (with roof garden layers) add to the efficient energy performance of the home.
The home is located across from one of Melbourne’s bay beaches, and it needed to easily accommodate the family’s regular beach visits. “From morning swims to summer days on the beach, the home is intrinsically connected to the sun, water, and sand,” says architect Tony Vella.
The windows and doors feature an extruded aluminum-clad exterior that is finished with a durable 70% PVDF fluoropolymer coating in a Rustic color. The look is contrasted by light-colored stone covering the poolside patio.
“My parents tell me they love the home every time they wake up,” says architect Ryan Bollom.
The home sits over a single level on the site and has a long, linear form that extends landscape views to the horizon. It is aligned to frame both the sunrise and the sunset.
“We always comb through work we really like for general inspiration when starting a project, but usually there isn’t one project we draw from,” says architect Ryan Bollom. “I’d consider The Barak House, designed by R&Sie in 2003, a more direct precedent for this home. Formally and conceptually it’s very different, but its core idea is a flexible wrapper over a more rigid home construction.”
The design concept is based around an interior space protected by an outer wrapper. The facade is a cement stucco, and the exterior roof structure is supported by durable cedar timbers with a basic Galvalume metal roof over a TPO flat roof. “We tried to use standard materials and finishes to minimize costs,” reveals architect Ryan Bollom.
The ground floor projects out from the slope and sits over the top of the concrete foundations, in which a wine cellar—accessed through a hatch in the hallway floor—is located.
The home is made of 42 unique cross-laminated timber panels. The smallest panel is 450 millimeters x 1500 millimeters, and the largest panel is the entire southern wall—14.4 meters x 2.3 meters. The cantilevered ground floor at the rear of the home was made possible by the strength of these panels.
There is a play between really earthy, natural materials—which are seen in some of the cladding, tiles, and concrete work—and a very sleek, black metal aesthetic. “I have a lot of experience in commercial architecture, so I’m not scared of using more commercial, industrial materials on a residential building,” says Craig.
The two wings are connected by the courtyard, and a dining and living space that opens to the street. Privacy is provided by a large, three-meter-wide sliding panel. "In the mornings, we open the panel up to allow our living space to engage directly with the street—think the Dutch Calvinist tradition of opening one’s home to the public gaze," says Joe. "We have met many neighbors as a result, and it is a powerful device connecting public and private realms and enabling community. In the evening before bed, we shut it down."
The house has two distinct wings—the 1885 original "front" and the contemporary "rear." The front part of the home has been restored to the original 1885 floor plan, while the rear of the home was demolished and replaced with a new build that contains the garage, bathroom, and storage on the ground floor, and the boys’ bedrooms on the upper floor.
Walls of glass, horizontal roof planes, and a natural material palette enable this expansive home to feel like an extension of a dramatic boulder-strewn landscape in Idaho.
The concrete walls are perforated by large and small windows that frame views of the trees and local forest, as the site doesn't offer expansive views of the surrounding landscape.
The concrete pool structure has been conceived as a separate element to the home and is sunk into the sloped ground.
The entire home opens up toward the north, and the entrance block is set back from the rest of the house.
An outdoor pool is situated among the trees, allowing swimmers to be completely immersed in nature. Like the home, its footprint was determined by the existing trees on the site, and its otherwise geometric form is playfully interrupted by a diversion around a tree trunk.
The home is divided into four different blocks, arranged to avoid impacting on the trees on site.
007 House by Dick Clark + Associates
The barn makes extraordinarily efficient use of timber milled from on-site trees.
The asymmetrical roof has a steep side and a low pitched side.
The architects used smaller bits of oak as wooden shingles for the roof.
Annemariken and Geert sourced old oak trees from their estate to build a barn that provides space for storage, working, and a car port.
Designed to comfortably accommodate three to five employees, the 1,000-square-foot home office by Matt Fajkus Architecture complements an existing midcentury abode. The addition includes two individual office spaces, a conference room, a studio, a bathroom, and storage space. An operable wall divides the main space as needed. The wood-and-stucco addition features a pitched metal roof that jives with the existing home's midcentury style.
The firm took inspiration from early barns in the area. “They’re very lightly built here because we don’t have snow,” says Haesloop. “So then the eaves are very tight. There are no overhangs. So, we were interested in using the Equitone to fold down to the land.”
This view shows the two forms backed by the Cypress trees. The main social areas are to the right, and the bedroom cube is to the left.
Windows wrap the length of the wall in the main section of the house and overlook the green space. “It’s a very unusual setting for the Sea Ranch—and Kieron, who’s from England, absolutely loves it because you get these beautiful big green meadows,” says architect Eric Haesloop.
“We wanted to create a house that did justice to the incredible landscape of the Sea Ranch, and also to its immediate surroundings—a combination of bright open space looking toward the ocean, but also an area that was sheltered and shaded by a gorgeous stand of Cypress trees,” say the couple. “We also wanted to preserve and honor the tradition of Sea Ranch architecture—Kieron is a huge history buff, and he had started reading about the origins of the Sea Ranch build paradigm, as well as the utopian ideals upon which it was founded in the 1960s.”
Street view
Pinon Ranch appears to emerge from the dense oak grove.
The “knuckle” connects the public and private spaces with the meadow on one side and the oak grove on the other. The space between the volumes is as carefully considered as the architecture itself.
Cantilevered out over the hillside the residence, which also serves as the couple's primary residence, is threaded between the trees, anchored by its concrete foundation which stops just short of the tree’s roots.
The gabled structure peers out from the dense oak grove to the meadow below.
Surrounded by 1.2 acres of flat land, the contemporary residence is designed to frame a unique, long view of Los Angeles—as well as the mountains beyond.
“Most homeowners would tear the whole thing down and start fresh,” says Brillhart. “But it made for a much more interesting project, preserving a little bit of Russell’s legacy and then adding two new wings on each side of the building.” An Ipe fence now lines the front of the property, and the two-story wing can be just glimpsed through the trees on the left.
The expansive estate sprawls over several terraced levels.
Slatted Tzalama wood screens provide privacy and light control as well as a pop of contrast against the concrete structure.
A traditional gapahuk shelter and an outhouse are some of the amenities offered at Fuglemyrhytta.
The home taps into solar energy sources and cross ventilation to reduce energy demands.
A densely planted garden shields the living room and dining area from view of the street.
Located in a Querétaro housing development, Casa Campanario is surrounded by new construction.
Casa Campanario’s simple and clean geometry is matched with a pared-back material palette of concrete, wood, and stone.
The clubhouse positively glows during golden hour.
A 100-mile drive from the Big Apple, the 15-acre property in Orient, New York, serves as a vacation retreat and refuge for a Brooklyn couple.
The DFAB House officially opened its doors at the end of February 2019. Construction began in 2017.
Exterior drone axonometric
Exterior
Exterior within Context
Exterior at Dusk
A view of the three-story DFAB House perched atop the NEST Building.
Consisting of three prefabricated units in West Seattle on a 5,000 square-foot lot, the Genesee Townhomes—by Method Homes and Chris Pardo Design—from 1,250-1,400 square feet, each with three bedrooms and two and a half bathrooms.
A dramatic cantilevered roof extends over the lower building volume, tying together the separate, yet connected, blocks of the home.
An interior courtyard is covered by trellised shading above, filtering light into the living spaces.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.