289 Exterior Concrete Siding Material Glass Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas - Page 2

The architects used smaller bits of oak as wooden shingles for the roof.
Annemariken and Geert sourced old oak trees from their estate to build a barn that provides space for storage, working, and a car port.
The minimalist facade is composed of floor-to-ceiling windows and light gray fiber cement panels secured with a proprietary blind mounting system.
Designed to comfortably accommodate three to five employees, the 1,000-square-foot home office by Matt Fajkus Architecture complements an existing midcentury abode. The addition includes two individual office spaces, a conference room, a studio, a bathroom, and storage space. An operable wall divides the main space as needed. The wood-and-stucco addition features a pitched metal roof that jives with the existing home's midcentury style.
The firm took inspiration from early barns in the area. “They’re very lightly built here because we don’t have snow,” says Haesloop. “So then the eaves are very tight. There are no overhangs. So, we were interested in using the Equitone to fold down to the land.”
This view shows the two forms backed by the Cypress trees. The main social areas are to the right, and the bedroom cube is to the left.
Windows wrap the length of the wall in the main section of the house and overlook the green space. “It’s a very unusual setting for the Sea Ranch—and Kieron, who’s from England, absolutely loves it because you get these beautiful big green meadows,” says architect Eric Haesloop.
“We wanted to create a house that did justice to the incredible landscape of the Sea Ranch, and also to its immediate surroundings—a combination of bright open space looking toward the ocean, but also an area that was sheltered and shaded by a gorgeous stand of Cypress trees,” say the couple. “We also wanted to preserve and honor the tradition of Sea Ranch architecture—Kieron is a huge history buff, and he had started reading about the origins of the Sea Ranch build paradigm, as well as the utopian ideals upon which it was founded in the 1960s.”
The terrace, furnished with pieces by Noé Duchaufour-Lawrance for Ligne Roset, is the perfect spot for taking in views of the L.A. basin.
Wexler and Harrison's original plan was to create affordable vacation homes for a growing middle class. When this home first went on the market with the others in 1962, it was competitively priced between $13,000 and $17,000. Today, the kitchen has been restored following guidelines from its original configuration, and the landscaping was updated in 2001 with Wexler's oversight.
Originally built in 1940, this 3,260-square-foot home has undergone a complete redesign, reimagining the property as a midcentury-inspired, contemporary estate. The renovation of the four-bedroom, five-bath residence also included the addition of an entirely new wing and landscaping including cacti and palm trees . Highlights of the home include an open indoor/outdoor floor plan, a vaulted tongue-and-groove ceiling in the great room, expansive glazing, and gorgeous desert landscaping across the 16,000-square-foot lot. The iconic home also comes with a bit of local history, as it was previously owned by Florian Boyd, the former Mayor of Palm Springs from 1953 to 1957.
Street view
The firm worked to provide as much outdoor access as possible, so the living spaces spill out onto a protected veranda, and a ladder climbs up to the green roof.
A service yard is discreetly concealed behind a concrete screen. What appears as a series of concrete blocks opens up and becomes completely transparent on the hillside. It's all about embracing the views, the setting, and the climate.
At night, the concrete screen and glass walls reveal the living spaces beyond further emphasizing the transparency of the home.
The architects took advantage of the uneven site and nestled the home into the landscape, providing opportunity for a series of stacked volumes with different uses.
Landscape designer Vania Felchar selected tropical plant species that aligned with the contemporary architecture of the home. The climate inspired the choice of broadleaf species with many different shapes, resulting in an organic texture of greenery against a simple, refined formwork.
Architect Richard Hammond and his wife, Daniela, a designer, saw their move to San José as a temporary adventure. But when they found an abandoned, partially built house on a beautiful sloping site, they decided to turn it into their dream home, putting down more permanent roots in the process.
A series of open and closed volumes, the house incorporates a range of materials, including local mahogany, standing-seam metal, shingled glass, and concrete. A green roof tops one end.
The five-acre hilltop locale is surrounded by trees and shrubberies with the original landscaping costs estimated to be approximately $3m, according to the listing agent.
A walkway leads into the gray-plastered entrance hall.
The back of Round Edge House opens up to views of the ocean.
There is a separate heating system for the expansive driveway to keep it free of snow and ice.
The International-style home features custom metal and woodwork, unique skylights, and glass canopies. The rectangular tower houses the master bedroom, a private penthouse study, and a rooftop observatory.
Pinon Ranch appears to emerge from the dense oak grove.
The “knuckle” connects the public and private spaces with the meadow on one side and the oak grove on the other. The space between the volumes is as carefully considered as the architecture itself.
Cantilevered out over the hillside the residence, which also serves as the couple's primary residence, is threaded between the trees, anchored by its concrete foundation which stops just short of the tree’s roots.
The gabled structure peers out from the dense oak grove to the meadow below.
The home’s concrete walls stand out among the bright green rice paddies.
Buenos Aires–based architect and furniture designer Alejandro Sticotti combined clean lines and a handmade aesthetic at his beach house in Uruguay. The home is made up of two stacked boxes built from steel and board-formed concrete and wrapped in glass and tropical hardwood. Surrounded by a fence in the coastal town of La Pedrera, it is a sanctuary within a sanctuary.
An abandoned airport terminal at New York’s John F. Kennedy International Airport was reborn as the TWA Hotel, a stylish stay that harkens on the romance of flying when it was still a novelty. Paying homage to the original architecture of the 1962 building designed by architect Eero Saarinen, JFK's only on-airport hotel is complete with midcentury modern guest rooms, a 10,000-square-foot rooftop deck with pool, and immersive experiences.
Custom landscape lighting illuminates the home's architectural features at night.
This building was the architect and furniture designer's own private vacation home.
The Laboratory was part of a massive construction boom that only gained steam after Lithuania declared independence from the newly-founded USSR in 1918.
The dramatic geometry of the church’s spire and form instantly identify it as a Saarinen work.
Although the Beira Railway Station is still technically in use, the Keeping It Modern grant will enable the city to find expanded uses for the postwar structure.
Surrounded by 1.2 acres of flat land, the contemporary residence is designed to frame a unique, long view of Los Angeles—as well as the mountains beyond.
The two-story addition hosts the master suite and a living area downstairs, and two bedrooms upstairs. It’s constructed of steel, concrete, and glass, to convey a “lightweight” quality that communes with the original mid-century architecture.
“Most homeowners would tear the whole thing down and start fresh,” says Brillhart. “But it made for a much more interesting project, preserving a little bit of Russell’s legacy and then adding two new wings on each side of the building.” An Ipe fence now lines the front of the property, and the two-story wing can be just glimpsed through the trees on the left.
The expansive estate sprawls over several terraced levels.
Slatted Tzalama wood screens provide privacy and light control as well as a pop of contrast against the concrete structure.
A traditional gapahuk shelter and an outhouse are some of the amenities offered at Fuglemyrhytta.
The home taps into solar energy sources and cross ventilation to reduce energy demands.
A densely planted garden shields the living room and dining area from view of the street.
Located in a Querétaro housing development, Casa Campanario is surrounded by new construction.
Casa Campanario’s simple and clean geometry is matched with a pared-back material palette of concrete, wood, and stone.
The curve of the stairways is echoed in Beck House’s archways.
The clubhouse positively glows during golden hour.
Argentinian architect Luciano Kruk has designed Casa Golf, a striking 2,949-square-foot dwelling that's comprised of three stacked concrete and glass volumes. Soaring high on a 10,764-square-foot plot of land, the contemporary residence is surrounded by breathtaking views and an unparalleled natural environment.
Designed by Arthur Witthoefft of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill in 1961, this five-bedroom, five-bathroom midcentury house is set in the woods of Armonk, New York. The 5,000-square-foot home features full-height walls of glass, a wraparound floating terrace, and a quiet deck that overlooks the site's sylvan surroundings.
For Bruce Shafer and Carol Horst's vacation home in the Tehachapi Mountains, architect Tom Kundig of Olson Kundig chose materials suited to the harsh climate. "The area is super cold in winter and super hot in summer," says Kundig, who designed a deep overhang to shade the core of the house from solar gain. "In the high desert, it's not just about being in the sun, it's about getting out of the sun."
The second-floor terrace forms a partial covering for the deck below it.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.