174 Exterior Concrete Siding Material Flat Roofline Glass Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

These steps lead to the rooftop garden. They run alongside the master bathroom, which features a glazed corner detail inspired by Carlo Scarpa's Canova Museum.
A timber boardwalk through the veld grass leads to a 15-meter, reed-filtration lap pool.
The planted grass roofs are a recreation of the landscape that existed before the home was built. They are dynamic landscapes that change with the seasons.
"Wendy and Lukas were looking for a natural, sporty lifestyle and a sustainably designed home," says Daffonchio. "It is always rewarding to see the owners living the lifestyle they had dreamed, and seeing their joy in living the home and its incredible surroundings."
Off-shutter concrete is created by removing the shuttering—normally wooden planks used as a temporary structure to contain setting concrete. "Casting the perfect texture of old wooden planks on the concrete, while getting all the services placed correctly inside the shuttering, was an Herculean task," says Daffonchio.
The material palette is almost exclusively "off-shutter" concrete, both inside and outside. The main metal elements are crafted from raw steel.
Monaghan Farm is a 1,300-acre eco-estate about an hour north of the center of Johannesburg. The architectural and environmental guidelines for the estate outline that only 3% of the land will ever be built on.
The modernist architect André Wogenscky worked with Le Corbusier for many years before launching his own architectural studio in 1956. The Villa Chupin represents one of his most rounded residential projects, lifted by the fluid, open, and playful nature of its main living space. The house sits within a garden of tall pine trees that tower over the two-level building. Five bedrooms are locate at the upper level, but the linear plan is eroded at the ground level, where the space becomes dynamic. Here, an open-plan living room is protected by an angled wall of glass to the front and curving walls that encircle the rest of the space.
As well as a sequence of innovative country houses, Peter Foggo and David Thomas complete a number of residences in Wimbledon. The most accomplished of these was this project, completed in 1963, sitting on a street of traditional and substantial period dwellings, mostly in brick. Foggo & Thomas’ house, in contrast, is both low slung and distinctly modern. Its structural framework is provided by a combination of concrete trusses that span the flat-roofed house, forming a series of spider leg ‘bridges,’ working in concert with a linear and lighter steel frame.
The concrete walls are perforated by large and small windows that frame views of the trees and local forest, as the site doesn't offer expansive views of the surrounding landscape.
The concrete pool structure has been conceived as a separate element to the home and is sunk into the sloped ground.
The entire home opens up toward the north, and the entrance block is set back from the rest of the house.
An outdoor pool is situated among the trees, allowing swimmers to be completely immersed in nature. Like the home, its footprint was determined by the existing trees on the site, and its otherwise geometric form is playfully interrupted by a diversion around a tree trunk.
The home is divided into four different blocks, arranged to avoid impacting on the trees on site.
When Wexler and Harrison’s steel homes first hit the market in 1962, they were competitively priced between $13,000 and $17,000. Shown above is Steel House #2.
Cedar, glass, and concrete combine in this minimalist pool house that draws inspiration from Mies van der Rohe’s 1929 Barcelona Pavilion. The pool house, built into a mountainside west of Montreal and designed by Halifax–based MacKay-Lyons Sweetapple Architects, employs board-formed concrete for the home's expressive exterior.
Los Angeles–based writer Leslie Longworth knew she’d found the perfect retreat when she spotted a five-acre lot in Pioneertown. Immersed in the rugged beauty of Joshua Tree with a dirt road for access, it was an ideal creative space. Seeking a low-impact build, she hired prefab company Cover to draft, construct, and install a custom home. The prefab came complete with fixtures, finishes, Wolf Sub-Zero appliances, and a state-of-the-art radiant heating and cooling system. In order to design around endangered Joshua trees, boulders, and the view, Cover used a combination of 3D mapping via drone imagery and handheld photos.
The minimalist facade is composed of floor-to-ceiling windows and light gray fiber cement panels secured with a proprietary blind mounting system.
The firm took inspiration from early barns in the area. “They’re very lightly built here because we don’t have snow,” says Haesloop. “So then the eaves are very tight. There are no overhangs. So, we were interested in using the Equitone to fold down to the land.”
This view shows the two forms backed by the Cypress trees. The main social areas are to the right, and the bedroom cube is to the left.
Windows wrap the length of the wall in the main section of the house and overlook the green space. “It’s a very unusual setting for the Sea Ranch—and Kieron, who’s from England, absolutely loves it because you get these beautiful big green meadows,” says architect Eric Haesloop.
“We wanted to create a house that did justice to the incredible landscape of the Sea Ranch, and also to its immediate surroundings—a combination of bright open space looking toward the ocean, but also an area that was sheltered and shaded by a gorgeous stand of Cypress trees,” say the couple. “We also wanted to preserve and honor the tradition of Sea Ranch architecture—Kieron is a huge history buff, and he had started reading about the origins of the Sea Ranch build paradigm, as well as the utopian ideals upon which it was founded in the 1960s.”
The terrace, furnished with pieces by Noé Duchaufour-Lawrance for Ligne Roset, is the perfect spot for taking in views of the L.A. basin.
Wexler and Harrison's original plan was to create affordable vacation homes for a growing middle class. When this home first went on the market with the others in 1962, it was competitively priced between $13,000 and $17,000. Today, the kitchen has been restored following guidelines from its original configuration, and the landscaping was updated in 2001 with Wexler's oversight.
Street view
The firm worked to provide as much outdoor access as possible, so the living spaces spill out onto a protected veranda, and a ladder climbs up to the green roof.
A service yard is discreetly concealed behind a concrete screen. What appears as a series of concrete blocks opens up and becomes completely transparent on the hillside. It's all about embracing the views, the setting, and the climate.
At night, the concrete screen and glass walls reveal the living spaces beyond further emphasizing the transparency of the home.
The architects took advantage of the uneven site and nestled the home into the landscape, providing opportunity for a series of stacked volumes with different uses.
Landscape designer Vania Felchar selected tropical plant species that aligned with the contemporary architecture of the home. The climate inspired the choice of broadleaf species with many different shapes, resulting in an organic texture of greenery against a simple, refined formwork.
Architect Richard Hammond and his wife, Daniela, a designer, saw their move to San José as a temporary adventure. But when they found an abandoned, partially built house on a beautiful sloping site, they decided to turn it into their dream home, putting down more permanent roots in the process.
A series of open and closed volumes, the house incorporates a range of materials, including local mahogany, standing-seam metal, shingled glass, and concrete. A green roof tops one end.
The five-acre hilltop locale is surrounded by trees and shrubberies with the original landscaping costs estimated to be approximately $3m, according to the listing agent.
A walkway leads into the gray-plastered entrance hall.
The back of Round Edge House opens up to views of the ocean.
There is a separate heating system for the expansive driveway to keep it free of snow and ice.
The International-style home features custom metal and woodwork, unique skylights, and glass canopies. The rectangular tower houses the master bedroom, a private penthouse study, and a rooftop observatory.
The home’s concrete walls stand out among the bright green rice paddies.
Buenos Aires–based architect and furniture designer Alejandro Sticotti combined clean lines and a handmade aesthetic at his beach house in Uruguay. The home is made up of two stacked boxes built from steel and board-formed concrete and wrapped in glass and tropical hardwood. Surrounded by a fence in the coastal town of La Pedrera, it is a sanctuary within a sanctuary.
Custom landscape lighting illuminates the home's architectural features at night.
This building was the architect and furniture designer's own private vacation home.
The Laboratory was part of a massive construction boom that only gained steam after Lithuania declared independence from the newly-founded USSR in 1918.
Surrounded by 1.2 acres of flat land, the contemporary residence is designed to frame a unique, long view of Los Angeles—as well as the mountains beyond.
The two-story addition hosts the master suite and a living area downstairs, and two bedrooms upstairs. It’s constructed of steel, concrete, and glass, to convey a “lightweight” quality that communes with the original mid-century architecture.
“Most homeowners would tear the whole thing down and start fresh,” says Brillhart. “But it made for a much more interesting project, preserving a little bit of Russell’s legacy and then adding two new wings on each side of the building.” An Ipe fence now lines the front of the property, and the two-story wing can be just glimpsed through the trees on the left.
The expansive estate sprawls over several terraced levels.
Slatted Tzalama wood screens provide privacy and light control as well as a pop of contrast against the concrete structure.
The home taps into solar energy sources and cross ventilation to reduce energy demands.
A densely planted garden shields the living room and dining area from view of the street.
Located in a Querétaro housing development, Casa Campanario is surrounded by new construction.
Casa Campanario’s simple and clean geometry is matched with a pared-back material palette of concrete, wood, and stone.
The curve of the stairways is echoed in Beck House’s archways.
The clubhouse positively glows during golden hour.
Argentinian architect Luciano Kruk has designed Casa Golf, a striking 2,949-square-foot dwelling that's comprised of three stacked concrete and glass volumes. Soaring high on a 10,764-square-foot plot of land, the contemporary residence is surrounded by breathtaking views and an unparalleled natural environment.
Designed by Arthur Witthoefft of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill in 1961, this five-bedroom, five-bathroom midcentury house is set in the woods of Armonk, New York. The 5,000-square-foot home features full-height walls of glass, a wraparound floating terrace, and a quiet deck that overlooks the site's sylvan surroundings.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.