438 Exterior Concrete Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

The back deck provides the perfect spot for entertaining and enjoying the lush landscape.
The wood and stucco addition features a pitched metal roof that complements the existing home's midcentury style. The hidden side windows (by the planter) allow natural light to filter in.
A view of the Saint-Laurence River and the concrete exterior of Habitat 67.
The home is approached from the south with views of Hood Canal below.
A staff worker tends to the grass roof.
The sheet metal roof and wood cladding of the new structure complements the smooth, shiny birch tree barks on the site.
In winter, the extension looks as if it’s covered in snow.
The new addition consists of a white prism that rests atop a concrete pedestal.
The house contains four bedrooms, one of which is presently being converted into an office.
The decades-old mango tree informed the arrangement of the home.
The concrete cladding contrasts with warm orange teak.
The dark cladding helps recede the simple, boxy home into the lush forest.
The southern and eastern elevations are mostly left opaque to provide privacy from the nearby access road.
Large windows punctuate the north elevation to pull views of the the water and landscape indoors.
A glimpse at the breathtaking views available from the home.
Set on the lower section of the slope, the second volume has a more modern facade, featuring concrete, steel, and glass materials.
The upper volume—where the garage, kitchen, service areas, two bathrooms, and a patio are located—is a half-submerged body of stone set within the upper section of the slope.
The rich material palette of stone, timber, glass, and board-formed concrete blend the home into the surroundings.
A glazed staircase placed on the south side of the building next to the hillside leads to the bedrooms on the upper level.
The house was strategically placed between the lake and an adjacent granite rock-face to capture key landscape views.
The property in Gooderham is set at the end of the original lake access road, and enjoys 1,300 feet of uninterrupted lakeside shoreline.
Passersby seeing its parged gray plaster facade would have no clue that the second story of Bret and Dani Stone’s home is made mostly of shipping containers. A crane stacked the units on top of the concrete-and-steel superstructure in a single day in late 2016. Architects Clay Aurell and  Josh Blumer, veterans of the medium, sourced the recycled boxes from cor10 Studios.
The original roof was flat with a flush parapet. In the early 90s, the former owners had a low-pitched roof placed on top of the existing roof, as well as new corrugated siding to cover the parapets. During the renovation, the interim roof was removed, and a new minimum-slope roofing structure was erected on the existing beams—reinstating the roof section toward the original design. The parapet is now clad with copper paneling.
The project encompassed exterior renovations and retrofitting, as well as four small additions to the building, and the construction of a new roof and landscaping.
The original building is set around an L-shaped courtyard. The main entrance is next to the carport on the street side, with a second entry toward the back of the house.
The goal of the renovation was to respect the high quality work of Kristinsson's original design, and retain the intent of the home where the interior spaces flow seamlessly into the exterior.
Front view of the FlatPak House in Minneapolis, Minnesota. When the architect first told his wife about his idea, she said, “It’s about time you focus on a house for me!” He continues, “It’s like the old story about the cobbler whose kids have no shoes.”
The courtyard is just one of many open spaces that will be highly utilized—in the non-winter months anyway. Concrete worked well with developing the language of FlatPak. The second level is a wood panel that can be clad in corrugated metal or cedar—different layers that can be plugged in like covers on your cellphone.
An exterior staircases rises along a courtyard-facing wall on one of the volumes, and leads up to a roof terrace that faces a mountain to the east.
The volumes that contain the living room and a guest bedroom were designed with roof terraces, and green roofs cover four of the other volumes.
After months spent researching solutions to make her home’s fabric roof functional, Lisa Sette can finally relax.
Although the house is perched on a high ridge, it sits modestly within the spectacular scenery.
The central, rectangular, concrete structure features expansive glazing which showcases the stunning scenery from every angle.
The elegant retreat combines contemplative spaces with a sense of drama.
Exposed concrete walls provide thermal mass and protection from wildland fires.
Since the home is located in a Class D Seismic Zone, the architects have designed the home beyond code-required structural standards with concrete foundations, steel columns, and composite decking.
A break in the concrete facade reveals the front entrance, which is marked by a thin steel canopy and two chimneys.
To meld the building with the landscape, the architects expanded the aspen grove around the southern approach to the structure.
At once part of the city and protected from it, the house benefits from plenty of open space and light and creates its own courtyard enclosure.
Aranzazu House - Besonías Almeida arquitectos
Aranzazu House - Besonías Almeida arquitectos
Aranzazu House - Besonías Almeida arquitectos
Mori’s addition is constructed of steel, concrete, glass, and bluestone veneer. She decided to preserve the ceiling height of the main house (11’6”) and lined the roof with Voltaic solar panels.
A cross sectional view of the house.
An aerial view of the clean-lined, futuristic home.
A staircase and a ramp rise where the transverse structures meet the pool volume.
The walls and ceiling structure rest upon two longitudinal beams of the same length, which have been placed under the floor slab. The same four walls that support the ceiling extend past the floor slab to create the base level for the bedrooms on the south end of the house.
The concrete beams support four walls, while also extending beyond to create massive, 23-foot-long cantilevers at both ends of the structure. As a result, the profile of the home looks like the letter "H" in the horizontal position, levitating on a slope.
Three bedrooms and bathrooms are located on the first level. Each room can adapt to accommodate a varying number of occupants.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.