331 Exterior Concrete Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

The facade
The vi
A Corten steel sculpture designed by the plastic artist Nivaldo Tonon.
Daring volumetric distribution creates an intriguing, sculptural form.
The cavern-like space underneath the middle volume serves as a parking area.
The middle volume is the largest and most transparent of the three volumes.
Originally designed as a single story residence the home features clean lines and an indoor-outdoor connection.
Set behind a gate and up a private half-acre drive, the home enjoys expansive westward views to the ocean.
Cabins from around the world
An exterior view of the International-style home.
A 23-foot breeze block brise soleil flanks the entrance of the Parker Palm Springs.
The stainless steel column is set outboard of the envelope to allow for a corner opening wall system.
The taller mass holds the sleeping spaces, while the living and gathering spaces are located in the lower elements.
In order to take advantage of the sun, the outdoor patio, opening wall system, and lawn were located on the southern side of the residence.
A house in Suffolk County with concrete foundational walls, charred siding siding and VMZinc zinc roof.
The former cement factory's grounds were brought to life with Mediterranean plantings.
Lush plantings espalier the concrete walls of the Ricardo Bofill Taller de Arquitectura headquarters.
The exterior of Ricardo Bofill Taller de Arquitectura's headquarters.
The perforated concrete panels on the façade of Casa Delpin.
In one of the last industrial pockets of West Town, UrbanLab’s Martin Felsen and Sarah Dunn created a modern live-work space that speaks to the neighborhood’s history in form and function. The Dukane Precast concrete panels were acid-etched for a more finished look.
An undulating, S-shaped interior wall guides the programs within this Brutalist-inspired concrete abode. 
In the city of Hsinchu in northern Taiwan, Taipei-based firm Yuan Architects designed a four-level dwelling with a Brutalist-style, raw concrete shell. An S-shaped wall weaves through the interiors, carving up public and private spaces shared by three generations of a family.
Built with specially-formulated concrete made of volcanic ash, this micro-house in Tokyo maximizes space through vertical construction. 
When Tokyo-based architecture firm Atelier TEKUTO received a brief from their clients to build a distinctive, environmentally-conscious concrete home, they embarked on a two-and-a-half year journey of spacial and material exploration. Built in 2015, the result—the R Torso C project—recently won the Overall Excellence Award and first place in the low-rise buildings category at the 2017 American Concrete Institute Awards.
A house has a barn-like profile in Amagansett, New York.
Charred cypress siding by ReSwan Timber Co.
Living room at night
Chenery Facade
Chenery Facade
Architect Joaquin Castillo blends inexpensive materials, the odd splurge, and a refined modernist sensibility to create an affordable weekend house for brothers Alfredo and Guillermo Oropeza. The facade is a juxtaposition of rough-hewn local stone, smooth concrete, glass, and steel—the material palette used throughout the structure.
The Pierre | Olson Kundig
The Pierre | Olson Kundig
The concrete structure was designed to fit within the existing dark volcanic rock walls.
S&S House - Besonías Almeida arquitectos
Cor-Ten steel acts as the primary exterior material.  Subtle design features in the steel paneling of the guest wing create notable results; every other panel is slightly offset to create visual and unexpected interest.
The driveway entrance introduces the stately side of the home, displaying clean lines made of concrete and Cor-Ten steel.  Almost every material implemented in this home was done so to create a maintenance-free space that withstands the weather and betters with age.  The design required minimal alteration of the site, a notable accomplishment in land preservation.  To maintain the natural grade, the structure is elevated and cantilevered at the slope, held up by columns which needed only a small amount of foundation work.  The only major land disturbance occurs in the recessed garage, which has been supplemented with a green roof on top to preserve the meadow.
A curved concrete block wall conceals one of the three exterior terraces.  Low-slung roofs appear to hover above the landscape.
“The sun rises behind the house and heats up the concrete mass during the morning, and [comes] through the front of the house in the afternoon; if need be the radiant energy warms up the house when temperatures drop in the evening,” says Thorsteinsson. Thanks to the thoughtful process, the couple was able to leave out the air-conditioning, and the house’s under-floor radiant heating system has turned out to be almost superfluous.
"We created a bosque of ironwood (Olneya tesota), one of our most cherished indigenous tree species,” Debra explains.
A concrete box.
A shell of concrete in the desert
Storey calls this house the “Eel’s Nest,” after the narrow urban properties that go by that name in Japan. Its façade was originally going to be wood, but because of local building codes and the fact the building is built along the edge of the property line, the exterior had to be fireproof. Storey covered it with stucco instead. “I wanted it to look as rough as possible,” says the architect. “Since it’s such a small house, it needed to be tough-looking.”

The workshop at ground level measures less than 200 square feet, but is set up to accommodate any kind of woodworking or welding; when not in use, the architect parks his car inside.
The only residence in Oregon designed by Wright, the Gordon House was designed in 1957 for Evelyn and Conrad Gordon, and finished in 1963 (four years after Wright’s death). Originally located adjacent to the Willamette River near Wilsonville, the home is now located within the Oregon Garden, in Silverton, Oregon. An example of Wright's Usonian vision for America, when its 2001 owners planned to tear it down, the Frank Lloyd Wright Conservancy obtained a three-month reprieve to dismantle it and move it southeast of its original location. The house opened one year later and is the only publicly accessible Frank Lloyd Wright home in the Pacific Northwest.
Built in 1948 and named 'Toyhill' by Wright himself, this Usonian home is considered an artistic masterpiece and shows Wright's early interest in overlapping circular masonry, which would become an innovative and iconic treatment found in his later work—including the Guggenheim Museum.

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.

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