168 Exterior Concrete Siding Material Design Photos And Ideas

Zoom out for a look at the modern exterior. From your dream house, to cozy cabins, to loft-like apartments, to repurposed shipping containers, these stellar projects promise something for everyone. Explore a variety of building types with metal roofs, wood siding, gables, and everything in between.

New addition at rear of house framing the original house and interior areas
The original home was only one story, but the need for two children’s bedrooms demanded a second floor in order to retain a modest backyard. The architects' first challenge was to preserve the home’s character in the second-story addition.
Fir slats on the wall and ceiling run through to the outdoors, visually expanding the space.
To deal with a Malibu site’s sharp incline, architect Bruce Bolander set the steel, concrete, and glass house on caissons. A deep wraparound porch nearly doubles the home’s living space and offers the ideal perch for outdoor dining and taking in spectacular views of the surrounding canyon. The garage serves as resident Dave Keffer’s home office.
Dr. Kenneth Montague’s Toronto loft is both home and art gallery—and the ultimate party house, thanks to two kitchens, a rooftop deck, and no shortage of conversation pieces. In warm weather, Montague’s parties spill onto the roof deck. To encourage guests to explore, Peterson designed two built-in light fixtures, made from LEDs behind white acrylic panels, that cast a dramatic glow across the sauna’s custom-made wood door, designed by Peterson and crafted by carpenter Daniel Liebster.
Galvanized-aluminum flashing is used to hide lighting fixtures and to delineate the tops of the redwood-strip walls. “It’s a simple palette of materials,” says Bornstein.
Designed Californian architects Swatt Miers, these three tea houses on a private property were conceived as spaces outside the main home that would be free from the distractions of Internet, telecommunications and television. The largest of the three pavilions is used as a workspace, the second as a bedroom, and the third as a meditation pavilion.
Windchime at Entry
Photo by Tom Bies
Casa ai Pozzi makes a bold statement on the mountainous shores of Lake Maggiore. The windows that wrap around this concrete villa afford stunning views of the Swiss Alps, and the inverted pyramid that supports the structure subtly mirrors the surrounding mountain peaks.

Photo by: Hélène Binet
The rear of the house looks onto a lush backyard. The rough, industrial prefabricated concrete panels by the German manufacturer Syspro are the building blocks of the home.
“I simply was drawn to the notion of concrete. So much great modern architecture has made use of it,” Blauvelt says.
The house in the evening, with the main living space and basement illuminated. "It gets pretty windy here," Jamie says. "I have nightmares about the roof coming off like the lid of a can."
The plexiglass tube's reverse lighting scheme emulates a starry sky above the patio when the interior is lit up at night.
The plexiglass tubes animate and add texture to an otherwise spartan facade.
Fir slats on the wall and ceiling run through to the outdoors, visually expanding the space.
To deal with a Malibu site’s sharp incline, architect Bruce Bolander set the steel, concrete, and glass house on caissons. A deep wraparound porch nearly doubles the home’s living space and offers the ideal perch for outdoor dining and taking in spectacular views of the surrounding canyon. The garage serves as resident Dave Keffer’s home office. Photo by J Bennett Fitts.
Developer Chris Sally has been known to have conversations with passersby from his “cigar-smoking balcony.”
The plan is simple: Two rectangles are connected by a bridge that traverses a desert wash. The effect of the light shining into the glass-walled living room is what first attracted Sette and Shikany to the house.
“The [home] is a sanctuary, despite being a duplex on a standard lot in a regular urban grid,” Marble says. Irrigation was limited to vegetable beds that feature drought-tolerant landscaping.
Challenged by the dimensions of the narrow lot, the team worked through significant programmatic and logistical constraints during the design and construction process. The final concept for the layout was a modern take on the side hall plan. The living spaces are stretched back deep into the lot, and strategically raised above grade to allow sunlight to penetrate into multiple living spaces. The multifunctional courtyard serves as outdoor workspace, gardening area, children's play area, and covered parking during winter months.
The home’s front façade features an anodized aluminum and glass curtain wall by Kawneer that's framed by Vic West black corrugated metal panels. The board-formed concrete on the exterior enables passive solar absorption, allowing optimal heat retention on cold winter days. The metal and concrete exterior cladding offers cohesive dialogue with the neighboring industrial sheds and commercial buildings.
The Hupert-Kinmont house lies low in a century-old apple orchard, far from neighboring houses. The spaciousness of the rural surroundings is echoed inside.
A patterned steel frame serves as a front wall to the street, allowing for light and noise to penetrate the interior. The owners were adamant about the importance of integrating the culture and traditions of Saigon into their home, hoping their children would grow up with a knowledge of and appreciation for the city.
Cabin Knapphullet is small cabin inspired by its location nestled between large rocks and low vegetation of the Sandefjord coast in Norway. It is only 323 square feet, but contains an open living space with a bathroom and a mezzanine bed that sleeps two people. Although the building occupies a small footprint, the space expands vertically over four levels including a roof terrace.
The Donning Community Building, constructed in 2006.
Villa by the Ocean, 2004, features a long, low profile and a green roof.
Near the main house, James Turrell’s pyramidal Skyspace structure invites visitors into its dark recess for a chance to view the heavens through a perspective-altering cutout. Most of Murren’s museum-quality art collection is inside the house, including a Robert Rauschenberg piece, a set of Andy Warhol prints, and a hologram by Turrell.
Architect Byoung-soo Cho and his wife, Eunsil Kim, value the privacy, and style, 

that a concrete wall and recycled Indonesian teak facade provide.
Cho’s recently completed vacation retreat, the Concrete Box House, was inspired by the use of raw materials. Cho decided on grape vines as an unusual landscape element.

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